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Author Topic: Documentaries  (Read 3969 times)
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Melllvar

DOOP Secretary
*
« on: 10-08-2003 21:26 »
« Last Edit on: 10-08-2003 21:26 »

Watching a documentary on TV last night, I wanted to post about it, so I searched and realised that there is no generic documentary thread.

Therefore here's one.

Last night's doc was A Very British UFO Hoax, which was about a group of British Movie Model Makers, paid by Channel Four to pull off a UFO Hoax, by designing, building and flying a remote controlled Flying Saucer over the village of Avesbury in Wiltshire.

More on this

The documentary was brilliantly narrated by Nick Frost (Mike from Spaced).

Here are a few more of my favourites:

Equinoxe: Electric Skies - Brilliant documentary about thunder and lightning storms, very compelling, with some frankly amazing footage, shot in "Lightning Alley" in America, and following a lightning photographer as he chases a storm.  There are some freaky interviews with survivors of lightning strikes too.

Behind The Music: Depeche Mode - DM's BTM Doc covered Dave Gahan's heroin years very well, with some great interviews ("It doesn't matter if you're sitting at No1 in the charts when you've got a f*cking needle in your arm, it doesn't f*cking matter!")

The Music Biz - A 1995 documentary I've got on tape, was in six parts and covered all aspects of the Music Business.

Classic Albums
1) Pink Floyd - Dark Side Of The Moon: recently released on DVD, this has great interviews with all members of Pink Floyd, as well as the other major players from the album.  Some great outtakes and rare footage.

2) The Who - Who's Next: Fantastically candid interviews with Pete Townshend, and the other surviving members of The Who, about what was (and is still) their best album.  Pete's emotional breakdown from not being able to complete his original concept ("Lifehouse" ), is all covered, and also features some great insight into each members contribution to one of the best albums of all time.

Live Aid: The 10th Anniversary
6 hours plus special which aired in the UK in 1995, and was the first time any footage from the event in 1985 was used.  All the best performances from the bands were aired again, and it was interdispersed with comments from all the protagonists.  Bob Geldof coming out with the most quotable lines: "I'm the only person to get a knighthood for saying 'fuck' on television".

You're like the fun vampire, but instead of sucking blood, you just suck...

STILL The Cuddly Face Of Heavy Metal
OC_James

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #1 on: 10-08-2003 21:28 »

Bowling for Columbine
This is a documentary about how fucking insane our fine country is becoming. Contrary to popular belief, this isn't a movie about hating guns, it's actually pretty objective.
Speli

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #2 on: 10-08-2003 21:54 »

How could you forget Bowling for Columbine? It makes you realize a whole lot of things; makes you laugh and be pissed off at the same time. Truly amazing documentary.

"What if I had a spear?"
Melllvar

DOOP Secretary
*
« Reply #3 on: 10-08-2003 22:00 »
« Last Edit on: 10-08-2003 22:00 »

I hadn't forgotten BFC.  I think it's an awesome documentary, however we have a thread dedicated to it.

So I wanted to steer away from it, and have one for TV Documentaries.

@Speli: As I was about to explain in chat, regarding BFC, it made me angry because I get unnecessarily emotionally involved in some TV Shows (one of the many reasons I don't do soaps) - specifically, the scene in which Dick Clark gives Mike the brush-off when he tries to explain about the mother of the kid who shot the six-year-old girl, who was working in his restaurant.

I think that was outrageous.
homerjaysimpson

Space Pope
****
« Reply #4 on: 10-08-2003 22:49 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by OC_James:
Bowling for Columbine
This is a documentary about how fucking insane our fine country is becoming. Contrary to popular belief, this isn't a movie about hating guns, it's actually pretty objective.

That documentary was truely funny. laff


"Sweet Guinea Pig of Winnipeg!"
BumbleBeeTheta

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #5 on: 10-08-2003 23:09 »

I've never seen Bowling for Columbine, but I'd like to.  However, I don't know if I would take all the statements made in the film as fact after reading this: http://www.hardylaw.net/Truth_About_Bowling.html

Who is Agent Codename: Dragonfly?
Melllvar

DOOP Secretary
*
« Reply #6 on: 10-09-2003 01:34 »
« Last Edit on: 10-09-2003 01:34 »

I'd take that with a grain of salt.  Same with all the other anti-bowling websites.

For the movie, as a documentary, and as a piece of entertainment, it's incredible. 

The things posted on that website are minor details, which pale into insignificance next to Michael Moore's interviews, especially with Charlton Heston and Marilyn Manson.

The contentious things in the film don't stand out, it's the things which definately are true which do.

EDIT: I'm not going to be drawn anymore on a discussion on this, as I've already posted that there's a thread dedicated to it.
DotheBartman

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #7 on: 10-09-2003 01:43 »

There's another site out there (I don't have the link, but I can get it if someone wants me to) that debunks, I think, every last one of Hardy Law's claims.  Some of Hardy's claims have some truth to them, but are ultimately pretty slanderous and missing the overall point.

Take it with a grain of salt, just as you would take Moore's film with a grain of salt.  Bowling for Columbine, though I love it loads, is not neccasarily an unbiased film.  He is not anti-gun at all and remains pretty objective on that issue, but certainly he some axes to grind with Bush and with the companies that ruined his hometown financially.  Take his theories and ideas as one viewpoint of many, though personally I found his to be most engaging and believable.

Oh, and do make sure you see the film, as it is very thought provoking and interesting.  Then you can read Hardy (and perhaps his debunker) and make your own conclusions.  That's part of what the film is meant to have its audience do anyway.
Spice Weasel

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #8 on: 10-09-2003 02:16 »
« Last Edit on: 10-09-2003 02:16 »

Say what you want about both sides.  Fact remains kid 1 wouldn't have capped kid 2 if there weren't any guns lying around.  Disarm and live.
DotheBartman

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #9 on: 10-09-2003 02:29 »

Have you even seen the film?

It doesn't try to make decisions about whether guns should be legal, but rather explores the roots of violence.  The gun thing is more or less a springboard.
Spice Weasel

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #10 on: 10-09-2003 02:31 »

I have seen the film.  Disarm and live.
bankrupt

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #11 on: 10-09-2003 13:05 »

Alright, that's enough Bowling for Columbine.  Melllvar pointed to a thread already dedicated to it.  If people want to argue about their ideas on gun control, they should start another thread like the old one Dr.T had.

@Melllvar:  That UFO documentary sounds cool.  Since I'll probably never get to see it, how did it come off?  Were they able to fool a lot of people?  The link you gave didn't have much info in it about peoples reactions.

On the History Channel:
 Teddy Roosevelt: An American Lion
A documentary about Teddy Roosevelt who I find to be one of the most interesting U.S. Presidents.  He's interesting to me because he had a strange blend of ideas that you don't find often in politicians today.  On one hand he favored putting into practice (for better or worse) the phrase "Speak softly and carry a big stick".  This area of influence has definitely trickled down to the current administration (where it's more "Tell everyone to fuck off and carry a big stick"  tongue).  On the other hand he helped dismantle large business trusts, helped start our national park system, and helped along organized labour.  I'd recommend checking it out if you are interested in this sort of thing and have access to it.
SHLEY

Delivery Boy
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« Reply #12 on: 10-09-2003 13:30 »

Disarm and live- didn't Hitler and Stalin preech the same idealogy ?
boingo2000

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #13 on: 10-09-2003 13:58 »

Best documentary i've ever seen is Terry Zwigoff's Crumb.  It's about underground artist R. Crumb.  It showes how his life has affected his work and kept him (comparitivly) sane, and what's amazing about it is Crumb is a pretty weird guy, but when the film puts him in context like it does, he seems almost normal.  If someone asked me to name a documentary that justifid the existance of documentaries, I'd give them Crumb.
Mouse On Venus

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #14 on: 10-09-2003 14:33 »

I actually made a documentary for my AS Level Media Studies project earlier this year called Build Them Up, Tear Them Down. It was about how the Portsmouth City Council keeps coming up with plans for new buildings and ends up screwing them up.

 Amazingly, not only did it get 120/120 but it also got shown in a post-16 students film festival called Show Us Your Bits 2003 where an audience of around 200 laughed at a council member's inability to answer a question and made fun of an old woman's use of the word "non-coordination". True story.  smile

 Leela: "That story stunk!"

 But I digress. My personal fave documentary has to be the spoof Brasseye, and in this case, the paedophilia episode. The fact that it caused so much uproar, yet was a very good satire about the way the UK media hyperbolises paedophilia, makes it one of the most memorable I've ever seen.
Zed 85

Space Pope
****
« Reply #15 on: 10-09-2003 14:59 »

I watched the first half of the docu-film-mini-series about Hitler staring Robert Carlyle (Trainspotting, Full Monty, Cracker, Hamish Macbeth) as the man himself. And while the physical differences are quite noticable, well, RC looks quite like a squirty, bitter and phsycotic little Austrian Corporal, but lacks the deep set eyes and ruler straight brow that the older Hitler had, absolutely everything else about it is absolutely incredible. As far as the role goes, Robert Carlyle is utterly, utterly convincing. Part two of two is on Saturday on Channel 4 BTW.

Along the same theme, many years ago I watched a BBC series called Weapons of War. The only two episodes I can remember were the Archers of Agincourt and the Carriers of Midway. The series was naratted by Sean "Boromir" Bean who was probably most famous at that point for his title role of Richard Sharpe, in a very famous series set during the Napoleonic War. The Carriers of Midway I remember the most because besides Sean's very sharp, very deep narative - I mean, a lot of the time, his accent sounds like an audiable mutter, good stuff too! - they put film footage of the battle to the music of Holst's "Mars". It was very powerful and moving imagery - sadly I haven't seen that series since, not even on the Digital stuff, which is full of terrestrial re-runs.
Melllvar

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #16 on: 10-09-2003 15:11 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by bankrupt:
@Melllvar:  That UFO documentary sounds cool.  Since I'll probably never get to see it, how did it come off?  Were they able to fool a lot of people?  The link you gave didn't have much info in it about peoples reactions.

Yeah, it was cool.  The reactions of the locals were one of awe, shock and amazement.  They showed reactions and footage from TV News coverage all around the world, who all got caught up in it.

They did achieve what they set out to do, but there were loads of problems, and they actualy flight was not without it's hitches.  They ended up having to ditch the craft in a field, and sprint to get the thing taken away before anyone saw them.

 
Quote
Originally posted by Mouse On Venus:
My personal fave documentary has to be the spoof Brasseye, and in this case, the paedophilia episode. The fact that it caused so much uproar, yet was a very good satire about the way the UK media hyperbolises paedophilia, makes it one of the most memorable I've ever seen.

I'm a big Chris Morris fan, and love his stuff.  Especially Brass Eye.  Which is why I started a thread dedicated to his shows.

You're like the fun vampire, but instead of sucking blood, you just suck...

STILL The Cuddly Face Of Heavy Metal
aslate

Space Pope
****
« Reply #17 on: 10-09-2003 19:11 »
« Last Edit on: 10-09-2003 19:11 »

The Rise of Adolf Hitler that was on C4 last Saturday/this Saturday.

Great representation and quite interesting. Should make very useful revision material for GCSE as that is the exact topic we're doing.
dadbot

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #18 on: 10-09-2003 19:32 »

Channel 4 showed a documentary called The Great Reality TV Swindle a few months ago.  It was about a guy who conned a group of people into giving up their jobs and taking part in a reality tv show to make a million pounds.  The show never existed and the whole thing was actually quite depressing.  The conman had done a runner and months later many of the people involved hadn't got their lives back on track.
Sweetmelly

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #19 on: 11-14-2003 21:25 »

When I am thought on Documentaries from British TV here are my favorites:

The Live of Birds
Walking with Dinosaurs
Walking with Prehistoric Beasts
LAN.gnome

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #20 on: 11-14-2003 21:53 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by bankrupt:
On the History Channel:
 Teddy Roosevelt: An American Lion
A documentary about Teddy Roosevelt who I find to be one of the most interesting U.S. Presidents.  He's interesting to me because he had a strange blend of ideas that you don't find often in politicians today.  On one hand he favored putting into practice (for better or worse) the phrase "Speak softly and carry a big stick".  This area of influence has definitely trickled down to the current administration (where it's more "Tell everyone to fuck off and carry a big stick"   tongue).  On the other hand he helped dismantle large business trusts, helped start our national park system, and helped along organized labour.  I'd recommend checking it out if you are interested in this sort of thing and have access to it.

Is this also called just TR? Because I saw a documentary on Teddy by that title that was very interesting. That guy had public support like you wouldn't believe. Aside from some war-mongering in Latin America, I think his was one of the top 10 US presidencies. Cool guy too; very quotable.

In fact, I used a guote of his once in a speech for a class election at my high school (let's see if I've still got it memorized  wink):

"Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than top take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in that grey twilight that knows not victory nor defeat."
alexvilagosh

Goose Patrol
Space Pope
****
« Reply #21 on: 11-15-2003 04:08 »

The Other Final
Two Dutchmen, after getting over the fact that their country had not qualified for the 2002 FIFA World Cup, dreamt up this idea to have a game between the worlds lowest ranked nations, Monserrat (Ranking 202) and Bhutan (Ranking 201).

The documentary follows the lead up to the game, and the game itself. It shows how football is a worldwide form of communication, and how it can bring people from entirely different cultures together.

I was lucky enough to tape this documentary when it was on SBS about a month ago, and it is truly amazing. If you ever get the chance to see it, don't pass it up. It is a moving show, and the words put up at the end really touched me.

Now leave the cinema and play football with a stranger.
Melllvar

DOOP Secretary
*
« Reply #22 on: 11-15-2003 04:57 »
« Last Edit on: 11-15-2003 04:57 »

That sounds cool, I'll look out for it.

An Impossible Job

If you want a great football documentary, this is the best (alongside, Bought For A Pound, the one on Leyton Orient, and the one about Barry Fry - both these and An Impossible Job were used as inspiration/reference for the movie, Mike Bassett: England Manager).

This documentary was supposed to be the triumphant account of England's qualification for the 1994 World Cup Finals, instead it turned into an account of surely England's darkest period.  There are numerous moments which stand out, surely painting the picture of Graham Taylor (a hugely successful club manager with Aston Villa and Watford) floundering in the waters of International Management, and surrounded by nothing but pathetic Yes Men (viz: Phil Neal) and England's worst team since 1974 (Dennis Wise, Geoff Thomas - two selections which still begger belief).

As an England fan, living through this period was tortuous and frustrating, but looking back, the footage is compelling and one cannot help feeling sorry for Taylor.  However, it's the story's conclusion (the penultimate "do or die" match against Holland in Rotterdam when bad refereeing, missed chances and Dennis Bergkamp conspired against Taylor, even in the light of one of England's best performances) that it really comes through.  The following match was the final nail in the coffin.

Unfortunately it gave the footballing world Taylor's crappy catchphrase: "Do I Not Like That!".
Mr. Potter

Professor
*
« Reply #23 on: 11-15-2003 11:12 »

I like a lot of the History Channel documentaries.

There's also this documentary called Cinemania about movie addicts that really scares me sometimes but I found it very addictive.
boingo2000

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #24 on: 11-15-2003 12:09 »
« Last Edit on: 11-15-2003 12:09 »

There's a movie that came out a few months ago called American Spleandor, and while it's not quite a documentary, it's pretty close.  It's based on the underground comic book series by Harvey Pekar, which in turn were about his daily life and routine.  Paul Giamatti plays Harvey, but the real Harvey narrates the film and gives several interviews, as do other characters who are represented in the film (ie, his wife and co-workers).  It's a fascinatin, entertaining movie.

Also, there's a doc that came out a few weeks ago called The Revolution Will Not Be Televised that I haven't seen yet, but it sounds good.
Love_For_Leela

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #25 on: 11-15-2003 12:20 »

Lesotho bja phelôa nônyane is good. I ususally need a running comentary from my brother though.

~~~When this is all over, remind me to run screaming into the night~~~
(You're standing on my neck)
Melllvar

DOOP Secretary
*
« Reply #26 on: 07-19-2005 20:05 »

*Bump*

Paradise Lost: The Child Murders At Robin Hood Hills/Revelations: Paradise Lost 2

Released as a single two-disk DVD set, these two documentaries (by acclaimed directors Bruce Sinofsky and Joe Berlinger - Metallica: Some Kind Of Monster) tell the story of the West Memphis Three.  A group of three teenagers tried and convicted of the brutal murder of three 8-year-old boys in an apparent satanic ritual.

The first movie covers the trials and the effects that this case has on the locals, the victims families and the families of the accused.  However, throughout the course of this film is appears more and more evident that the three teenagers (Damien Echols, Jason Baldwin and Jesse Misskelley) could possibly be innocent and are the victims of a local witch-hunt.  Mainly because the evidence against them consisted of the fact that they wore black, read Stephen King books, and listened to Metallica.

The film unearths some genuine characters, namely Echols himself (especially in the first film), and, tellingly, one of the victims parents, John Mark Byers - a true-blue, bible-thumping nutcase if there ever was one.

It's compelling viewing.

The second film details the events brought about by the first film, namely the formation of the Free The West Memphis Three Support Group, which gained worldwide notoriety and support.  Also, the events surrounding various appeals, and legal experts casting their opinions over the case - including the revelation that some spectacular evidence seemingly exonorating the three was dismissed.

Like I said, compelling viewing, and makes for a truly dumbfounding view on bible-belt America.  Makes you wonder how this kind of this can happen, really.

9.5/10
 http://www.wm3.org/
airbagfailure

Space Pope
****
« Reply #27 on: 07-22-2005 06:03 »

Supersize me

as hyped as it was.. it was pretty interesting insight on how eating too much mcdonalds can really effect your health...
I'm also hanging out to see Tarnation.. about the guy living with his mother who got given electro shock treatment as a kid, and turned into a schitzophrenic... that looks good..

David Bowie, Sound and Vision
wicked documentry about david bowie's life... even has an intereview with trent in there for your pleasure.
Mr. Potter

Professor
*
« Reply #28 on: 07-22-2005 13:50 »
« Last Edit on: 07-22-2005 13:50 »

I saw The Fog of War last week. It's basically an interview with Robert S. MacNamara, the United States' Secretary of Defense from 1960 to 1967. It's very interesting to hear him talk about the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Cold War, Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, Vietnam, etc.

I'm not really sure if he's telling the truth or just distorted truths (probably the latter) but it still is a great examination of a very important character during the Cold War.
~FazeShift~

Moderator
DOOP Ubersecretary
**
« Reply #29 on: 07-22-2005 14:18 »

I like those Horizon or Equinox ones too, particularly Supervolcano and Mega Tsunami.

Because both go into detail of how the United States will be annihilated.  tongue
alexvilagosh

Goose Patrol
Space Pope
****
« Reply #30 on: 07-23-2005 19:24 »

I've been digging some documentary series recently, both from the BBC.

Frontline Football
Follows teams in war ravaged areas in their bids to qualify for the world cup in 2006. Interesting, and at times touching. I like touching documentaries. Especially touching documentaries about football.

African School
Guess what? It's touching. Touching touching touching. Touch it! Also it's quite good, even if its a bit slow at times.
evan

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #31 on: 07-26-2005 01:19 »

Melllvar, if you liked that documentary, I recommend Capturing the Friedmans. It's another doc about a small town New England family with a sinister secret underneath the pleasant exterior. The father was arrested for child pornography and pedophilia, but always  claimed his innocence. His eldest son was charged with helping his father commit these crimes and for covering up the aftermath.

The film uses mostly old home movies the family made before and after the accusations. While some of the family members support the father's innocence, the mother eventually believes that her husband is this horrible monster and deserves to be put in jail. And how the filmmakers put the documentary together, you're never quite sure that the Friedmans are completely guilty or innocent of the crimes they supposedly committed. It's quite unique and non-judgmental. The focus is instead on how a family can be torn apart from mistrust. I strongly recommend it.

IMDB page
Melllvar

DOOP Secretary
*
« Reply #32 on: 08-12-2005 01:56 »
« Last Edit on: 08-12-2005 01:56 »

I'd read an article about that documentary (which was linked to one about Paradise Lost).  I may just check it out.

Meanwhile:

Live Forever: The Rise & Fall Of Britpop

Now, I could watch music docs by the bucketload and this is another total and utter gem.

Whether you liked it or not, the Britpop era threw up a slew of cobblers bands, and a group of genuine characters.  All of which are featured in this film.

Starting with The Stone Roses gig at Spike Island in 1990 and ending with Oasis' third album "Be Here Now", this movie goes through the definitive british musical, cultural and political moments of the 1990's (New Labour, Oasis Vs Blur, New Lad Culture/Loaded, Cool Brittania, Damien Hirst).

The genuine characters are (love 'em of loath 'em): Damon Albarn (Blur), Noel Gallagher (who's genuinely hilarious), Liam Gallagher (who provides the films standout moment) and Jarvis Cocker (Pulp - for me, the star of the Britpop era, and the star of this film).

Looking back to this period I can see why people did get carried away with all of the euphoria of Britpop (Blue Vs Oasis on the 10 o'clock news, is the zenith).

The films standout moment is the irascible Liam Gallagher taking on the director when he tries to explain why Liam has an "androgenous quality":

"What does that mean?  That I'm a bird?"

Also, look out for Pulps performance of "Common People" at Glastonbury '98 (I'm in the audience for that gig).

9/10
Melllvar

DOOP Secretary
*
« Reply #33 on: 08-22-2005 13:52 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by evan:
Melllvar, if you liked that documentary, I recommend Capturing the Friedmans. It's another doc about a small town New England family with a sinister secret underneath the pleasant exterior. The father was arrested for child pornography and pedophilia, but always  claimed his innocence. His eldest son was charged with helping his father commit these crimes and for covering up the aftermath.

The film uses mostly old home movies the family made before and after the accusations. While some of the family members support the father's innocence, the mother eventually believes that her husband is this horrible monster and deserves to be put in jail. And how the filmmakers put the documentary together, you're never quite sure that the Friedmans are completely guilty or innocent of the crimes they supposedly committed. It's quite unique and non-judgmental. The focus is instead on how a family can be torn apart from mistrust. I strongly recommend it.

IMDB page

Based on your recommendation, I went and bought this documentary, and you're right, I was blown away by it.  Simply amazing home-movie footage of the family which captures not only the history of the family and the kids formative years, but the video-diaries of the time around the case is incredible.

Yet again, it's great to see a movie which isn't shoving it's viewpoint down your throat, and allows you to make your own judgement.

I'll recommend this along with Evan.

9/10
mint

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #34 on: 09-30-2005 18:39 »
« Last Edit on: 09-30-2005 18:39 »

Supersize Me

Watching this film might make you want to stay away from the fast food restaurants, but if not, it'll make you think more about what you are eating. Near the end of the film it tells us that McDonald has scaled back its super size menu shortly after the film's release, although corporate bigwigs claim it had nothing to do with this film. And in the near beginning of the film Morgan Spurlock interviewed a French woman; she said the smallest size in the U.S is the biggest in France. Well Mc Donald is not allowed to sell Burgers bigger than that in France; such law present is to help people control the amount of junk they eat. This piece of information is quite interesting. Then you need to have more self control in the U.S. regarding junk food eating. This film is a good educational tool for the masses especially for young people, considering how much Mc Donald affects children.

A-
CrapBag

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #35 on: 10-22-2005 12:57 »

i loved supersize me. and i admit that it did not make me want to stop eating fast food, but actually did the opposite, it made me very hungry. it is no doubt the best documentry i ever watched. and i have not watched a lot. but keep in mind, im only 15, so i prefer a good action movie
dr.bender nye

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #36 on: 10-22-2005 15:18 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by mint:
Supersize Me

Watching this film might make you want to stay away from the fast food restaurants, but if not, it'll make you think more about what you are eating. Near the end of the film it tells us that McDonald has scaled back its super size menu shortly after the film's release, although corporate bigwigs claim it had nothing to do with this film. And in the near beginning of the film Morgan Spurlock interviewed a French woman; she said the smallest size in the U.S is the biggest in France. Well Mc Donald is not allowed to sell Burgers bigger than that in France; such law present is to help people control the amount of junk they eat. This piece of information is quite interesting. Then you need to have more self control in the U.S. regarding junk food eating. This film is a good educational tool for the masses especially for young people, considering how much Mc Donald affects children.

A-

That Doc is good but i'd like to see 30 days when More4 is showing it.

pojy

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #37 on: 10-26-2005 10:01 »

bowling for columbine is a good documentary on how guns are misused in the u.s and incidents which have happens, also Supersize me kicks ass!
mint

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #38 on: 10-27-2005 15:43 »
« Last Edit on: 10-27-2005 15:43 »

Recently I heard on the news they will now put nutritional contents of informations on Mc Donald's products. I think it is a good thing they are doing as most of us think twice when we know how much calories we are consuming.
tyraniak

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #39 on: 10-31-2005 12:01 »

A good older Documentary is  "Harlan County USA" It's about a very violent mining strike in a small pennsylvania town
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