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Author Topic: Come December, keep in mind there is already a Star Wars thread - Movie Reviews  (Read 43317 times)
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UnrealLegend

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« Reply #680 on: 06-05-2020 12:31 »

So I finally managed to get around to watching X-Men: Dark Phoenix, and it's... not good. Terrible dialogue, a sloppy plot full of loose ends, a complete joke of a villain and with the exception of Michael Fassbender, the acting was trash.

Quote from: Mystique
Kurt, teleport into that spaceship and do literally everything while I sit on my ass complaining!

Quote from: Also Mystique
Why do the women do all the work Charles!!!!

Some of action was neat, so at best it's worth a YouTube search. But it doesn't have a lot going for it. The tension between the mutants and government is just handwaved and forgotten. Magneto's many attempts of genocide are forgotten. Quicksilver is forgotten (by me, because he just... vanishes from the movie and is never mentioned again). The villain is completely devoid of any kind of character and instead serves as nothing more than a mean little voice in Jean's ear.

Anyway, I guess this movie gets a  :sleep:/10
David A

Space Pope
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« Reply #681 on: 06-08-2020 19:38 »

Magneto's many attempts of genocide are forgotten.

To be fair, that happened a lot in the comics too.

"Hey, isn't this the same guy that tried to kill all of us, on multiple occasions?"  "Well, yes, but this week he says he's sorry about that and now he's on our side."  "Oh, okay."
UnrealLegend

Space Pope
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« Reply #682 on: 06-09-2020 13:10 »

Yep. And that's exactly why movies based on comic books shouldn't be too afraid to abandon the shittier, more nonsensical characterisations like that.
David A

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« Reply #683 on: 06-09-2020 18:51 »

Yeah, I've never been a fan of stories where the heroes and villains team up, unless it's a temporary alliance where circumstances have forced them to work together, or some such.

Reformed villains becoming heroes can be done well, but in my experience, most writers do a very poor job of it.  Characters who change sides frequently like Magneto does are the worst.
UnrealLegend

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« Reply #684 on: 06-22-2020 12:41 »

I watched Horse Girl on a whim the other day. It's a pretty unsettling and sad movie, but I kinda liked it. I'm surprised its Rotten Tomatoes score is so low.

Also, I wasn't expecting to see Alison Brie quite so... naked.

Annie is pretty young, we try not to sexualise her.
transgender nerd under canada

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« Reply #685 on: 06-27-2020 09:08 »

For a second I thought you meant that movie where Samuel L. Jackson runs a magic unicorn shop. Seems like they have the same kind of energy, having read the synopsis.

I might watch it.
David A

Space Pope
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« Reply #686 on: 06-27-2020 13:56 »

That one had Brie Larson, not Alison Brie.  They were both on Community though, so I can see how you'd get them mixed up.
UnrealLegend

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« Reply #687 on: 06-27-2020 14:27 »

If they merged together into one mega-Brie, would she be called Brie Brie or Alison Brie Larson?
David A

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« Reply #688 on: 06-27-2020 15:26 »

Alison Brie Larson, I would think, although she might be Brie Brie to her friends.
transgender nerd under canada

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« Reply #689 on: 07-01-2020 05:56 »

What I'm getting from this is that too many actresses are named after cheese.
UnrealLegend

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« Reply #690 on: 07-01-2020 11:43 »

That's a funny way to say "not enough".
transgender nerd under canada

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« Reply #691 on: 07-05-2020 00:16 »

The Man Who Killed Hitler And Then The Bigfoot seems like just another Hobo With A Shotgun type production.

It's actually a very artistic, poignantly sad, hilariously poorly made, amazingly detailed rollercoaster.
David A

Space Pope
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« Reply #692 on: 08-31-2020 08:00 »

The New Mutants

Okay, so this movie got a lot of stuff wrong.  That's to be expected; comic book movies almost always do.  It doesn't really matter.  I'm just here for Illyana.

In the movie, Sam has lots of injuries because he's "not so great at landing."  Okay, but in the comics he's invulnerable while he's blasting.  Maybe it's supposed to be because he hasn't learned to control his powers yet?  I don't know.  It doesn't really matter.  I'm just here for Illyana.

In the comics, Rahne is Presbyterian, not Catholic.  Maybe the people who made this movie don't know the difference?  It doesn't really matter.  I'm just here for Illyana.

For some reason, two of the characters are lesbians in this movie.  The people who made this movie do know that there are Marvel characters who are actually gay in the comics, right?  They could make movies featuring those characters instead of making other characters gay.  It doesn't really matter.  I'm just here for Illyana.

Illyana's backstory is a bit different in this movie.  That's understandable.  They could make an entire movie just about Illyana's origin, and they'd still have to leave out a lot of stuff.  Her powers aren't really explained either.  In the comics, her mutant power is teleportation, but she also has magical powers, including the use of her Soulsword.  In the movie, she can teleport and summon her Soulsword, but no attempt is made to explain why she has two separate and seemingly unrelated powers.

Illyana gets the best line in the movie.  (You'll know it when you hear it.)  Actually, she gets all of the best lines, and steals every scene that she's in.  This is supposed to be Dani's story, but Illyana is the real star here.  Okay, I'll admit that I might be a bit biased.  Watching Illyana (and Lockheed!) taking on the Demon Bear during the film's climax was worth the price of admission alone.

I give it two and a half stars.  It gets an extra star just for including "Bastards of Young" on the soundtrack.

Tachyon

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« Reply #693 on: 12-28-2020 04:08 »

Casablanca

Yes, as difficult as it may be to believe, last night I watched Casablanca for the first time. Given that it was shown on Turner Classic Movies I feared that it would be colourized but luckily it was shown in the original B&W. And I didn't realize the fact until this moment, but I can't recall seeing or hearing any defects in the film at all...sleeks, flaked-off emulation, faded areas, etc. It was super clean. And the sound was good.

The surprise to me is that it was so fast-paced...every moment filled. I felt the magic. Perhaps I should watch The Maltese Falcon and the entirety of The African Queen (I've seen parts of it before).

Tachyon

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« Reply #694 on: 02-14-2021 04:33 »
« Last Edit on: 02-14-2021 04:40 »

Watched a couple of documentaries yesterday, starting with Armstrong, partially narrated by Harrison Ford as the voice of the late Neil Armstrong and featuring moments from interviews with many people involved in the early days of the American space program. I was surprised to learn that not only did Armstrong know Ed White, one of the three who were incinerated alive in the Apollo 1 fire, but that Ed was one of his best friends, and that they bought a piece of property together and built houses on it and were neighbors. Surprisingly to me, the program didn't really touch on the details of the little speech that Armstrong gave when he stepped off the LEM ladder and onto the moon. The "One small step for a man. One giant leap for mankind" thing, where a combination of slurring and radio static masked the "a" from "a man".

And also Mission Control: The Unsung Heroes of Apollo, with maybe 10-15 of the NASA flight directors, the principal two being Chris Kraft and Gene Kranz. I'd read both their autobiographies and having read them it was pretty special to see those guys and hear their stories in their own voices. Imperfect. Driven. And ultimately successful. And of course many of the other directors and a number of astronauts from that era. Fwiw, this was the only program I've seen that detailed the background story of the infamous "1202" alarm that very nearly resulted in aborting the Apollo 11 landing, just a few minutes before they touched down on the lunar surface. Spoiler: mostly by chance, they'd encountered a 1202 alarm during a simulation run a couple of weeks prior, and actually had it listed on their handwritten cheat-sheet of alarm codes.

I'd known about the 1202 alarm backstory from reading Lost Moon: The Perilous Voyage of Apollo 13 by Jim Lovell, the guy played by Tom Hanks in the movie Apollo 13. Also a great read.

If you have an interest in early spaceflight, both of these documentaries are worth a watch.

David A

Space Pope
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« Reply #695 on: 02-14-2021 22:10 »

The "One small step for a man. One giant leap for mankind" thing, where a combination of slurring and radio static masked the "a" from "a man".

He flubbed the line and forgot to say it.  I know that the official story (at least at the time) was that the "a" couldn't be heard due to radio static or somesuch, but there's no pause between "for" and "man."  He never said it.

I learned about the 1202 alarm from some program that I watched on the Science Channel a while ago, but I don't remember the title of the program.
UnrealLegend

Space Pope
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« Reply #696 on: 03-06-2021 12:10 »

I decided to watch Parasite on a whim this evening. I loved it far more than I expected. Despite all the awards it won, I shamefully have to admit that I found it a little hard to get excited over a foreign movie on account of me being an uncultured idiot.

It was incredibly suspenseful and I almost forgot it was in Korean because I was so engrossed in what was on-screen.

100% recommend this movie.
Gorky

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« Reply #697 on: 03-22-2021 02:40 »

Strangers on a Train

Had to watch this movie for a class I'm taking, and I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say that this Alfred Hitchcock guy is a pretty good filmmaker! I was familiar with the basic premise of the film--the ol' murder switcheroo--going in, but things certainly didn't pan out how I expected (including the relatively happy ending; I suppose I was anticipating something bleaker).

But regardless, the plot was genuinely suspenseful (unsurprisingly, considering the whole "Master of Suspense" thing), and there were several moments that made me laugh out loud (some of the minor characters, largely the women, are delightfully oddball and charming). I do feel like Haines's tennis match intercut with the Antony-going-to-plant-the-lighter part was a smidge too long, but props to Hitch for turning a dude fishing a lighter out of a sewer grate into edge-of-your-seat entertainment.

Oh, also, I'm never getting on a fucking carousel again in my life. :hmpf:

4.5/5
UnrealLegend

Space Pope
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« Reply #698 on: 04-03-2021 13:32 »

I saw the Snyder cut of Justice League.

Honestly, it was pretty terrible. Most definitely better than the original cut, but that's barely an achievement. It was just way too fucking long and full of pointless scenes that just padded the length. I admit that I haven't seen the Whedon version since it came out, so my memory is a little fuzzy, but I think an extra 30-40 minutes would have been more than enough to fix it.

I have to say though, Cyborg was a good character, and I recall hating him in the original. So, at least there's that.
David A

Space Pope
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« Reply #699 on: 04-03-2021 17:28 »

I never understood what one of the Teen Titans was doing in a Justice League movie anyway.  :confused:
winna

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« Reply #700 on: 04-04-2021 07:18 »

Strangers on a Train

Had to watch this movie for a class I'm taking, and I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say that this Alfred Hitchcock guy is a pretty good filmmaker! I was familiar with the basic premise of the film--the ol' murder switcheroo--going in, but things certainly didn't pan out how I expected (including the relatively happy ending; I suppose I was anticipating something bleaker).

But regardless, the plot was genuinely suspenseful (unsurprisingly, considering the whole "Master of Suspense" thing), and there were several moments that made me laugh out loud (some of the minor characters, largely the women, are delightfully oddball and charming). I do feel like Haines's tennis match intercut with the Antony-going-to-plant-the-lighter part was a smidge too long, but props to Hitch for turning a dude fishing a lighter out of a sewer grate into edge-of-your-seat entertainment.

Oh, also, I'm never getting on a fucking carousel again in my life. :hmpf:

4.5/5

He must have had a tremendously grand time making that one.  It even features trains in it!

Clearly it blends cinematic elements that demonstrate his early affection in life for the early German cinematic surrealist movement.  I do enjoy his penchant for cleverly weaving shadows and light which are a keynote for most of his career before color became a staple in movie history.  His appetite for using new technologies and seeing others experiment with unique camera techniques; e.g. the intriguing effect, even to this day, of the dolly camera pan zoom employed extensively in Vertigo.
Tachyon

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« Reply #701 on: 04-04-2021 09:58 »

"Dolly zoom" isn't a term I'm familiar with, so I just took a short side trip. And one of the examples deconstructed was a scene in Jaws which I remember well but I'd never paid any attention to the camera work. Thanks for the tip :)



Gorky

Space Pope
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« Reply #702 on: 04-12-2021 02:45 »

So, I just watched Vertigo for the aforementioned class, and this is likely an unpopular opinion but holy hell was it a piece of shit. Forget the fact that Jimmy Stewart and Kim Novak have zero chemistry, which is a huge problem in itself (I also recently watched Rear Window--which overall I would rate a 3.5/5, OK, not great--where Hitchcock expected me to believe that Grace fucking Kelly was desperately in love with this goober: I wasn't buyin' it then, and I ain't buyin' it now). But the story is also horribly paced and rather lacking in the typical Hitchcockian suspense, plus nothing any of the characters do (including Midge, who had the potential to be great but got done dirty because apparently she, too, could not resist Jimbo's...sex appeal?) makes any sense. (I have this critique about several of the Hitchcock movies I've seen over the past few weeks; Marnie is another movie where no one is behaving in a way resembling the way any actual human being has ever acted, but while the uncanniness worked there--I quite enjoyed Marnie, solid 4/5--it fell flat for me here). Yes, there are some cool/interesting directorial techniques on display, and the soundtrack is (unsurprisingly) pretty awesome, but what an unpleasant viewing experience and what a stupid, misogynistic bunch of hooey.

1.5/5
winna

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« Reply #703 on: 04-12-2021 04:56 »
« Last Edit on: 04-12-2021 05:09 »

We could always watch Cat on a Hot Tin Roof or Equus. The young actor in the latter seems to have good chemistry with the horse, and for the former, at least it isn't a Charles Bukowski novel, right?

Edit: Hitchcock went into the film-making industry as a director pretty early on in the development of that industry--he was also an early adopter and enthusiast of virtually every prominent and significant new technology that developed alongside and within that medium.  I bring up these points because silent movies have a tendency to be very different in themes and how they blossum and are presented as opposed to say, a movie blockbuster that came out within the last two decades.  He started his directing career doing silent films.  He was also a fan of theater productions, I think, and every time I see a play, to me it's like I'm watching Gilmore Girls and the characters only serve as a temporary vehicle to deliver the dialogue the scriptwriter found personally amusing, whether it had an appropriate atmosphere to be presented in or not.

Unsure if those points make sense or if they're even valid counter observations to the critiques you presented.  If I enjoy(ed) Hitchcock though, it would be more about his crafting the cinematography, as it seems he was very enthusiastic to tell stories utilizing environments, lighting, and camera angles rather than characters and the actors/actresses he had dutifully serve in that generally necessary role.  :shrug:
Gorky

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« Reply #704 on: 04-12-2021 13:45 »

First, if I'm watching Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, it is primarily to gawk at Paul Newman in his prime:



Second, and more importantly, I appreciate your take on Hitchcock as a filmmaker! I agree that the problem here might just be that I'm asking Hitchcock to give me something he's not remotely interested in delivering, and I would enjoy these movies more if I recalibrated my expectations a little. That said, because so many of his films seem to be psychological thrillers as much as anything else--Marnie is an excellent, and largely effective, example--I don't know that it's entirely out-of-bounds to expect a bit more depth from the characters (but I do appreciate your point about the characters being vehicles to deliver what is, at many times, quite sparkling and witty dialogue; in fact, my favorite part in Vertigo was probably the first scene between John and Midge, which is loaded with grade-A, quasi-flirtatious banter).
Tachyon

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« Reply #705 on: 04-12-2021 16:31 »

I haven't the slightest idea why I ever watched Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. Dramas do nothing for me, and as an introvert who grew up in a less-than-utopian household, scenes with intense, confrontational dialog often have me reflexively reaching for the mute or fast-forward button.

But I did watch most of it, late one night when cruising for something of interest. And that photo startled me, as my recollection was that the film was monochrome, not color. Either my memory of it has faded over time to the point of desaturation, or I had watched it on a black & white television set.

winna

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« Reply #706 on: 04-12-2021 21:24 »

This discussion has been quite profitable, as we haven't had to converse about either Equus or Bukowski at any disappreciable depth.  Awesome. :D
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