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: DXC interview on GGTTG  (Read 411 times)
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zappdingbat

Bending Unit
***
« : 05-14-2020 14:37 »

I'm not sure if this has already been posted yet. I searched the board and couldn't find it, so this might be new, and I thought it was worth sharing.

There was interview back in 2014 with David X Cohen, on the podcast Geek's Guide to the Galaxy. It doesn't contain many surprises, but it's worth a listen.

A text version of the interview is here:
https://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/nonfiction/interview-david-x-cohen/

The podcast version is here:
https://geeksguideshow.com/2014/09/19/ggg118-david-x-cohen/

(As an aside, I'd recommend the podcast for anyone who's interested in author interviews for sci-fi books; it also has regular tv/movie reviews.  It's usually hour-long interviews, and the host does a good job of preparation and of covering a wide range of topics.)
David A

Space Pope
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« #1 : 05-15-2020 03:35 »

Quote
Book-wise, thereís not much comedy science fiction that Iím aware of

Really, Cohen?  You're saying this on a podcast called Geek's Guide to the Galaxy, and you don't think that there might be a pretty obvious example that you may have possibly overlooked?
winna

Avatar Czar
DOOP Ubersecretary
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« #2 : 05-15-2020 08:02 »

Was GalaxyQuest a book?
David A

Space Pope
****
« #3 : 05-15-2020 19:20 »

There was a novelization of the screenplay, but I don't think that that's what you meant (and it's certainly not what I meant).
zappdingbat

Bending Unit
***
« #4 : 05-16-2020 03:25 »

Quote
Book-wise, thereís not much comedy science fiction that Iím aware of

Really, Cohen?  You're saying this on a podcast called Geek's Guide to the Galaxy, and you don't think that there might be a pretty obvious example that you may have possibly overlooked?

I get what you're saying (Hitchhiker's guide! obvs :))

As it happens, the host of the podcast has complained along similar lines. There is HHGTTG, but beyond that, there isn't very much.

Writing this out now, though, I wonder if the ratio of comedy:non-comedy is more-or-less the same in sci-fi as it is in general fiction.
David A

Space Pope
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« #5 : 05-16-2020 05:29 »

Robert Asprin, better known for his Myth Adventures series of comedy fantasy novels, wrote a series of comedy sci-fi novels, starting with Phule's Company.  I'm not sure if Poul Anderson's The High Crusade counts as comedy sci-fi, but it certainly has comedic moments, and the 1994 film adaptation is full-on comedy.  Some of Asimov's short stories definitely qualify as comedy sci-fi.

Stuff is out there, if you look for it, but I'd agree that it's not particularly common.
Tachyon

DOOP Secretary
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« #6 : 05-16-2020 08:18 »

I read a bit of Anderson back in the day, as a daydreaming young particle. And Kieth Laumer wrote a number of sci-fi short stories and novels revolving around an antihero operative whose casually extreme, unlikely exploits are described in nearly tongue-in-cheek detail. "Retief" is the protagonist's name, if I recall correctly.

Gorky

Space Pope
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« #7 : 05-16-2020 22:47 »

Quote
Book-wise, thereís not much comedy science fiction that Iím aware of

Really, Cohen?  You're saying this on a podcast called Geek's Guide to the Galaxy, and you don't think that there might be a pretty obvious example that you may have possibly overlooked?

With the caveat that I have neither listened to this interview nor read The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, my understanding is that Adams's books are more satire than straight-up comedy. But I could be wrong on that, and it's possibly a meaningless distinction anyway.

I also tend to think of Vonnegut as a comic novelist, and while not all of his books can neatly be described as sci-fi, that also strikes me as a glaring omission.
winna

Avatar Czar
DOOP Ubersecretary
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« #8 : 05-18-2020 08:25 »

I've always thought that the fire bombing of Dresden was a bit of a highlight of situational improvisation in human history.

Also Ender's Game was pretty comical to watch.  I'd have never guessed Orson Scott Card was a Mormon.
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