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Author Topic: Most revolutionary animated sitcom?  (Read 402 times)
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PEE Poll: Most revolutionary animated sitcom?
The Flintstones   -4 (20%)
King of the Hill   -0 (0%)
The Simpsons   -12 (60%)
The PJs   -0 (0%)
Family Guy   -0 (0%)
The Jetsons   -0 (0%)
Dilbert   -0 (0%)
Baby Blues (cartoon)   -0 (0%)
Futurama   -4 (20%)
Mission Hill   -0 (0%)
Total Voters: 20

Cyberman

Bending Unit
***
« on: 08-03-2004 10:36 »

I pick the Flintstones 'cause it was the first followed by the Simpsons and Futurama.

Pitt Clemens

Urban Legend
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« Reply #1 on: 08-03-2004 11:36 »

SOOOOOOOUTH PAAAAAAAARK! Mission hill? WTF?  South Park.
Dr_Dave

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #2 on: 08-03-2004 11:57 »

If you're talking revolutionary, then it's the Flintstones, no contest.  It was the first animated, prime-time sitcom  and no one expected it to succeed. 

I give the Simpsons honorable mention.
Shaucker

Professor
*
« Reply #3 on: 08-03-2004 14:23 »

Baby Blues is an adapted newspaper comic...and the comic's much better. Ditto Dilbert and Mission Hill.

Where's Ren & Stimpy? Shouldn't that be up there?
Otis P Jivefunk

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #4 on: 08-03-2004 14:25 »

Futurama...
Cyberman

Bending Unit
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« Reply #5 on: 08-03-2004 14:25 »

I was never a big Ren and Stimpy fan to tell the truth.
Alee

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #6 on: 08-03-2004 15:51 »

The Flintstones, absolutely.

Though Ren & Stimpy did breathe new life into the animation industry, it wasn't a sitcom. I wouldn't change my vote if it had been.

Kicked your ass.
newhook_1

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #7 on: 08-03-2004 17:54 »

I'll say, The Simpsons. The Flintstones were great and all, but besides being in a prime time slot, they weren't really all that different, content wise, from every other cartoon in the 60s era.

The Simpsons really pushed the limit of what was acceptable on a network television cartoon show. If it wasn't for the Simpsons, the content of primetime cartoons would never have gotten beyond the level of the Flintstones, and you wouldn't have a whole bunch of great cartoons in the mid to late 90s (Ren and Stimpy, Bevis and Butthead, Futurama). 

The Flintstones on the other hand, while it was a fantastic show, triggered Hanna Babeara's 1970s crap fest.
Dr. Morberg

Professor
*
« Reply #8 on: 08-03-2004 17:59 »

While I wouldn't vote for it, South Park should be on there, for pushing the limits of acceptability on TV. But My vote goes to the Simpsons, for these reasons. (They are my own thoughts! I don't care what you say)!

I'll say, The Simpsons. The Flintstones were great and all, but besides being in a prime time slot, they weren't really all that different, content wise, from every other cartoon in the 60s era.
The Simpsons really pushed the limit of what was acceptable on a network television cartoon show. If it wasn't for the Simpsons, the content of primetime cartoons would never have gotten beyond the level of the Flintstones, and you wouldn't have a whole bunch of great cartoons in the mid to late 90s (Ren and Stimpy, Bevis and Butthead, Futurama).

The Flintstones on the other hand, while it was a fantastic show, triggered Hanna Babeara's 1970s crap fest.
David A

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #9 on: 08-03-2004 18:08 »

Urusei Yatsura.
Coop

Professor
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« Reply #10 on: 08-03-2004 18:17 »
« Last Edit on: 08-03-2004 18:17 »

Oh yeah, we all know how revolutionary that one was. In fact, it changed the face of animated television so much, that it's no wonder everybody talks about it.

Doesn't sound like you're trying to be elite at all.


The official CARLITO of PEEL
SlaytanicMaggot
Professor
*
« Reply #11 on: 08-03-2004 19:48 »

Space Ghost Coast To Coast?
Aqua Teen Hunger Force?
Brak Show?

Please edit your sig to 120 pixel height max.
[This message has been edited by Administrator [-mArc-]
Blackadder11

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #12 on: 08-03-2004 20:12 »

Which came first, Homestar Runner or the Brak show? Because frankly, one seems to be a ripoff of the other.

And I'll say South Park.
victor2000
Starship Captain
****
« Reply #13 on: 08-03-2004 20:17 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by newhook_1:
If it wasn't for the Simpsons, the content of primetime cartoons would never have gotten beyond the level of the Flintstones, and you wouldn't have a whole bunch of great cartoons in the mid to late 90s...).
This is the same reason I voted for the Simpsons.

Shaucker

Professor
*
« Reply #14 on: 08-04-2004 00:13 »

The Flintstones is just a copy of The Honeymooners, which was quite revolutionary in its own.
Pitt Clemens

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #15 on: 08-04-2004 01:10 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by David A:
Urusei Yatsura.

While I can't cast my lot in with the TV series [WAAAAY too ecclectic].  The second Urusei Yatsura movie is surely among the most enscaunching, revolutionary and memorable animated features of all time.  But really, If we were talking revolutionary animated Movies, I'd be plastering the board with Project A-ko and Macross: Do you remember love?

TheLampIncident

Urban Legend
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« Reply #16 on: 08-04-2004 12:18 »

Even though I'm not terribly familiar with the show, I'll say the Simpsons. They're the pioneers of the kinds of shows we're all watching now.
bankrupt

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #17 on: 08-04-2004 13:04 »

I vote for the Simpsons.  The show paved the way for adult content animation.
Cyberman

Bending Unit
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« Reply #18 on: 08-04-2004 14:25 »
« Last Edit on: 08-04-2004 14:25 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Shaucker:
The Flintstones is just a copy of The Honeymooners, which was quite revolutionary in its own.

At least it was an antimated version of the Hooneymooners.

Shaucker

Professor
*
« Reply #19 on: 08-05-2004 00:02 »

Yeah, but that's all it really was. Some TV guy decided to take Ralph and Alice and stick them in the stone age.
Nasty Pasty

DOOP Secretary
*
« Reply #20 on: 08-05-2004 13:10 »

Simpsons. Because they're like....yellow.
Pitt Clemens

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #21 on: 08-05-2004 13:29 »

Child's toy and Excel saga.

Welcome to the era of the Hyperheroine!
leelaholic

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #22 on: 08-05-2004 13:39 »

Even if South Park pushed the envelope harder, The Simpsons pushed it first.
DotheBartman

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #23 on: 08-05-2004 14:16 »

There's really no answer besides The Simpsons.

"The Flinstones" was hardly innovative.  Its just, as others said, The Honeymooners animated, with annoying "stone age" gags to boot.  And it hardly started a revolution; "The Jetsons" was a ratings failure and short lived, and the other prime time animated shows up to "The Simpsons" didn't fare any better.

"The Simpsons" is what truly kicked off animation as an acceptable (if still struggling) staple of prime time.  Not only that, but it revolutionized the sitcom genre itself (as opposed to merely copying it like The Flinstones) and brought social commentary to prime time in a way that hadn't been done since "All in the Family".

"South Park" should be there too.  Not because I'd vote for it, but because outside of "The Flinstones" and "The Simpsons" its the most notable and important prime time show.  Plus it had the once notable successful movie that didn't kill the series.
DrJohnZ

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #24 on: 08-05-2004 14:24 »

revolutionary? well the simpsons had yellow people.
But Futurama was sopmething really new, all of that futuristic stuff they displayed
Bushmeister

Professor
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« Reply #25 on: 08-05-2004 16:02 »

The Simspons is easily the only one on the list to have set up a precedent still carrying on today, giving the idea that animated series can match live action ones in terms of quality (not that that wasn't true beforehand, just not widely accepted).
FemJesse

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #26 on: 08-05-2004 17:12 »

If it wasn't for HB scenarios like The Flinstones, there would be no Simpsons, Futurama or Family guy.  Cartoons would still be like Bosco and Steamboat Willy... or the CN Cartoon Cartoons... 
This is a hard choice between Flintstones and Beavis and Butthead.  Beavis and Butthead wasn't the first cartoon that people have claimed to inspire "Bad behavior/choices" in kids... but its probably the most affected, being the first cartoon intended for older teens.

How many humans were in cartoons before "The Flinstones"  how socially acceptable would it have been to spring The Simpsons on a culture obsessed on anthropomorphic characters in shallow storyboards?
DotheBartman

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #27 on: 08-05-2004 22:21 »

I'm not sure about chronologically, but plenty of Hanna Barbara cartoons from the same time had human characters (and still were mostly just "wacky" cartoons, that usually mixed in animal/robot/car type characters as well, including The Flinstones).  Hanna Barbara itself was revolutionary (not entirely in a good way, IMO), but The Flinstones was merely a piece of its revolution, if a more important piece.  The Flinstones didn't start a revolution on its own, the way The Simpsons did.

Beavis and Butthead...debateable, but it is an important show.  It proved that the "adult animation" thing wasn't a fluke (various Nickelodeon shows in the post Simpsons world, like Ren and Stimpy, did push boundries, but were mostly still aimed at children) after a string of network failures (all of which, incidentally, starred mostly animal characters instead of humans, a key mistake).  And of course it caused a lot of controversy, albeit not much more then The Simpsons (although unlike The Simpsons it was in fact specifically blamed for accidents, specifically involving fire).
futuramafreak

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #28 on: 08-05-2004 23:26 »

The Simpsons.  I've seen D'oh in multiple non-Simpsons video games.  That = Revolutionary.
Beamer

DOOP Secretary
*
« Reply #29 on: 08-06-2004 04:03 »

Obviously The Flinstones was the first ever prime-time sitcom, so of course it deserves a big mention... however, my vote goes to The Simpsons. If it wasn't for that show, none of the other shows (with the obvious exception of The Flinstones) would be here.

Although I can't see how some of these shows got on the list... King Of The Hill? Dilbert? Yes, I like both those shows - but they're hardly revolutionary.

I think South Park should be on this list, though. While it took a deliberate step backwards animation-wise, it really did revolutionise modern TV censorship.

Either way, I'm still voting for The Simpsons.  smile
Tweek

UberMod
DOOP Secretary
*
« Reply #30 on: 08-06-2004 04:04 »

I voted Futurama as South Park wasn't on the list.
LAN.gnome

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #31 on: 08-06-2004 05:09 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by SlaytanicMaggot:
Space Ghost Coast To Coast?
Aqua Teen Hunger Force?
Brak Show?

If you're asking why those aren't on the list, you need to be slapped. One of those the most revolutionary sitcom ever? Puh-lease.
DotheBartman

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #32 on: 08-06-2004 05:48 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Beamer:

Although I can't see how some of these shows got on the list... King Of The Hill? Dilbert? Yes, I like both those shows - but they're hardly revolutionary.

To be fair, KOTH is fairly important as prime time animated shows go.  Its innovative in the sense that it took The Simpsons' formula, but "hardened" it into something that's consistantly realistic and character based, as opposed to The Simpsons which, especcially starting with season four, often went toward wackier stories and jokes).  Agreed about Dilbert though, and Mission Hill and all those other smaller shows that were cancelled.

And for those voting for Futurama...don't let personal bias get in your way of sense.  I love Futurama to death, but its made very little impact and is thus far notable mainly as a cable rerun hit.  Its hardly been "revolutionary", great as it was nonetheless.  Perhaps its time will come when it will become a major source of inspiration for other shows, but that time has not come yet.

Coop

Professor
*
« Reply #33 on: 08-06-2004 06:12 »

I'm going to be elite too and nominate and unknown.

The answer is, "Wait Till Your Father Gets Home," which paved the way for every show on earth that followed it.
Gorky

Space Pope
****
« Reply #34 on: 08-06-2004 15:03 »

The Simpsons, easily. As it's been said, The Flintstones in an animated version of The Honeymooners. The Simpsons, however, paved the way for everything that's come after after it Look at Family Guy or even King of the Hill--even if they aren't "clones" per se, they had the courage to do what they did (for FG being outrageous and for KOTH being character-driven) because of what The Simpsons had accomplished earlier (you could say that Beavis and Butthead also inspired this, but that's debatable). Still, The Simpsons was there first, being the earliest animated show to have empathetical, believable characters and well-written, emotional storylines. When coupled with the fact that it was the funniest show to come along in a while, you can tell that it's something special. 

And I agree with DotheBartman, Futurama--no matter how much I love it--isn't truly revolutionary (unless you count the fact that it survived longer than other shows put in the 7:00 death slot).
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