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Author Topic: Some people say it's like 'Friends' but it's not- How I met your Mother  (Read 2528 times)
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Spacedal11

Space Pope
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« Reply #120 on: 04-29-2014 08:42 »

Well I guess if you're pumpkout you can't be pumpkin.

futurefreak

salutatory committee member
DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #121 on: 04-30-2014 10:30 »

This thread has some looooing posts.

Having only seen a handful of episodes (each one was pretty much the same anyway, don't hit me) I did find it interesting how the ending with the kids was filmed nine years ago. I did not know this when I went Huh?!? to seeing Lyndsy Fonseca on the show and thinking 1. How could she go from being a badass assassin on Nikita to this, and 2. Damn she aged well. Which she still did. She practically looks the same! Interesting how they had to sign a contract to keep quiet about it this whole time.
Tonya Rodriguez
Crustacean
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« Reply #122 on: 04-30-2014 22:49 »

I've seen all the episodes on Netflix and I really like it.
Motor Oil

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #123 on: 05-02-2014 01:21 »

Hey look, I can respond to Gorky exactly one month after she responded to me! That was TOTALLY intentional and not at all a result of my forgetting about this thread and then avoiding posting because I felt bad about forgetting about it!

I'm not sure I buy the fact that they're both people who are unable to commit themselves to a relationship; in Robin's case, particularly, she was willing to sacrifice a promotion for her relationship with Don, which the show treated as a huge step for her, choosing love over her career.

It's not that they are unable to commit themselves to a relationship, but that they do not invest themselves in relationships as quickly as (here's the easy example) Ted. Ted (using Marshall's standards) considers a relatively serious relationship to be reached at third base (with an exception to one-night stands). Barney and Robin went beyond this point consistently and many times over without considering themselves to be in a relationship, and even after becoming official boyfriend and girlfriend, they took a while to adjust, and then to progress further in their relationship.

I think the finale also demonstrated that Robin and Barney want different things, too. Barney's desire for children was established in season seven--and, honestly, I think that desire was independent of the fact that his potential child was Robin's; he was willing to adopt a kid with Ted and/or steal his brother's baby--and even though he claimed this past season that Robin's infertility did not bother him, I never completely bought it (by the same token, I did believe Ted's claim in season seven that he loved Robin despite the fact that she never wanted kids. I am totally willing to admit it's possible that I'm skeptical of Barney's coolness with the no-kids thing primarily because I never wanted him to end up with Robin in the first place, so feel free to disregard my reading of his character's motivations and such).

I can see how they do, indeed, want different things. But I do think that Barney would have been satisfied with a life without kids, even if he would have been happier with them. I guess you have convinced me to no longer be in favor of Barney and Robin as a couple, for as I try to think of a way to defend them, nothing worthwhile comes to mind (in fact, everything that does come to mind works against my original point). But I am still strongly against Robin and Ted. They worked decently the first time, and I did enjoy the time when they were friends with benefits (much more than when they were dating), but Ted's obsession over Robin was pretty annoying. They really milked that relationship for all it was worth a long while ago. By the end, they were beating a rotting horse.

I personally think that Robin would be happiest alone, with no romantic partner and few close friends, and even those that she is closest to are somewhat distant from her.

There is certainly something to this--and, in fact, I would have been totally fine with an ending where Robin wound up alone and Ted lived happily ever after with Tracy (assuming she had chosen a life of solitude on her own terms, and not simply because Barney and Ted were no longer interested in her).

I believe that Robin could have been happy with Kevin. I think that she actually did pressure him to break up with her, and I think they could have worked out if she hadn't done that. They always seemed to work well together. In all honesty, I would have been happy if they had stayed together for the whole series and if Barney had stayed with either Nora and Quinn (preferably Quinn), and Ted with Tracy. Once Robin and Kevin had broken up, I really expected her to not get together with anyone, but I did support her and Barney the first time around, so I went with them the second time.
I agree with you that it would not have been okay if Robin had settled with being alone only because everyone else was bored with her. I don't like Robin, but I still would have been upset if that had happened.

I don't think he was trying to replace Tracy, or relive his glory days with Robin; rather, I think he was sharing an inside joke with a friend--one that didn't necessarily have the same Grand Romantic Overture undertones as it did in 2005, but that still represented their friendship and their history. It seemed more playful than anything else, not a symbol of Ted's undying love but a tongue-in-cheek reminder that neither of them were twenty-somethings anymore, but there was enough history between them to perhaps warrant giving a relationship another go. It almost felt like a dare.

I think this is a much more likely interpretation of the writers' intentions. smile

My main dissatisfaction with the series ending was simply the fact that Ted's relationship with Tracy was not developed whatsoever, when all of his others were: Victoria and the cupcakes, Robin and the blue French horn, Zoey and the Arcadian...sure, we saw a few great moments with Tracy, but I don't think any of those could really compare to the romance we saw earlier, with different girls.
Gorky

Space Pope
****
« Reply #124 on: 05-03-2014 22:49 »
« Last Edit on: 05-03-2014 22:52 »

Hey look, I can respond to Gorky exactly one month after she responded to me! That was TOTALLY intentional and not at all a result of my forgetting about this thread and then avoiding posting because I felt bad about forgetting about it!

Oh, I just took your silence as a concession to my awesome (read: not awesome at all) argument. tongue

It's not that they are unable to commit themselves to a relationship, but that they do not invest themselves in relationships as quickly as (here's the easy example) Ted. Ted (using Marshall's standards) considers a relatively serious relationship to be reached at third base (with an exception to one-night stands). Barney and Robin went beyond this point consistently and many times over without considering themselves to be in a relationship, and even after becoming official boyfriend and girlfriend, they took a while to adjust, and then to progress further in their relationship.

This is a good point. I will say that I wouldn't have minded the Barney/Robin thing if it had remained casual and not necessarily monogamous--I guess because I never really thought they could last in the long-term, and a friends-with-benefits kind of arrangement would've suited their personalities quite nicely.

Here's the main reason a long-term Robin/Barney pairing was so absurd to me: I never got the sense that Robin loved Barney. Her feelings for him just sort of appeared at the end of season four; we didn't get any insight into them beforehand--it's not like she was pining for him post-"Sandcastles in the Sand," and there was no jealousy-over-his-other-flings thing like Robin had going for Ted in season one. It seemed like the writers just wanted her to be in love with Barney because they had gone to such lengths to show us how Barney was in love with her; Robin was like this prize that Barney won for maturing so much in season four.

Don't get me wrong: I loved his arc in season four; the pining-for-Robin thing really deepened his character and made him far more sympathetic and human than he'd previously been. But that character growth would have remained if Robin had rejected Barney, or if their break-up in season five had permanently ended their romantic relationship; afterwards, Barney could've just moved on to the far better-matched Quinn (or, if you'd prefer, Nora; I liked both of 'em well enough), and Robin could've settled down with Kevin.

I mean, a Robin/Kevin pairing probably wouldn't have lasted long-term, either, because of Robin's jet-setting ways--which then would have freed her up to be with Ted in the finale, if that's what the writers wanted. I also think the writers would have been more inclined to allow Robin to sort of still have feelings for Ted if she was married to Kevin--which would have been unconscionable while she was with Barney, because Barney was The Writer's Favorite and Awesome and Legendary and whatever the hell else. I kind of think that's why Robin just magically stopped being interested in Ted from season seven on, whereas you could still sort of buy her being into him from seasons three to six: it would have complicated the already-complicated love triangle--and, more importantly, it would've hurt poor Barney's feelings. It also would have made the series finale make a hell of a lot more emotional sense, but no matter.


I can see how they do, indeed, want different things. But I do think that Barney would have been satisfied with a life without kids, even if he would have been happier with them.

I'll give you that one.

I guess you have convinced me to no longer be in favor of Barney and Robin as a couple, for as I try to think of a way to defend them, nothing worthwhile comes to mind (in fact, everything that does come to mind works against my original point).

Oh, I didn't mean to ruin them as a couple for you or anything; you're certainly entitled to your opinion. I do think Robin and Barney had a nice sexual chemistry on-screen, and the scenes where they're just hanging out as bros are also great; their scenes together are oftentimes just fun to watch.

But I don't think they had the same sort of...I don't know what you'd call it--emotional chemistry?--that Ted and Robin had. I always felt that, despite their differences of opinion on kids and marriage, Robin and Ted had a deep friendship that parlayed nicely into romance. Perhaps they were not as sexually compatible as Robin was with Barney, but I'm the sort of mushy-gushy female who prefers that emotional connection to a purely physical or otherwise superficial one.

My main dissatisfaction with the series ending was simply the fact that Ted's relationship with Tracy was not developed whatsoever, when all of his others were: Victoria and the cupcakes, Robin and the blue French horn, Zoey and the Arcadian...sure, we saw a few great moments with Tracy, but I don't think any of those could really compare to the romance we saw earlier, with different girls.

This is fair: Ted's relationship with Tracy was seriously underdeveloped. But as far as the lack of Big Gestures goes, I think the show was trying to make a point about how, when you meet the right person, you don't need all those over-the-top romantic shenanigans. I mean, Lily and Marshall are the show's Gold Standard for Romance, and the writers always tended to emphasize the small but hugely important things they did for each other: telling each other everything (even silly things, like what they ate for lunch), supporting each other, making sacrifices for each other. The wonderful thing about Lily and Marhsall's relationship is how much they simply enjoy being together, how comfortable they are with each other and the life they share.

And I think we saw that same sense of joy and comfort in every last scene between Ted and Tracy--which was certainly facilitated by the ridiculous amounts of chemistry the two actors had. Ted and Tracy seemed to relish every second they spent together, they had a shared sense of humor, they had similar values. They loved each other. So I guess it doesn't bother me that we didn't see Ted stealing her a blue French horn or taking her on a two-minute date or risking his career for her: the whole point of their relationship is that it didn't need to be flashy because it had a true depth of feeling to it.

And that depth of feeling shone through every scene they had together. Honestly, I think something as simple as that scene where Ted and Tracy are back at the Farhampton Inn a year after the wedding is as wonderful--as romantic, as magical--as something like Ted making it rain for Robin. It's a different kind of romantic, but in its own way it's just as beautiful.
Motor Oil

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #125 on: 05-14-2014 01:37 »

I wouldn't have minded the Barney/Robin thing if it had remained casual and not necessarily monogamous--I guess because I never really thought they could last in the long-term, and a friends-with-benefits kind of arrangement would've suited their personalities quite nicely.

It would have, definitely, but I did enjoy their moments together. I think the main reason I was so upset with their breakup in the finale was because of how rushed it is: we saw the beginning of their engagement in such incredible detail--why, it was the focus of the whole season!--but they explained the breakup in, what? Two minutes? Less? The explanation really did not have to go on for very long: I was satisfied with their first breakup which, while it was short and sweet, provided enough information for me to support the decision.

Here's the main reason a long-term Robin/Barney pairing was so absurd to me: I never got the sense that Robin loved Barney.

I admit that I did have a problem with that when they were first engaged. Robin had only wanted Barney because of the Lobster Effect, and presumably once she'd gotten him, she'd be satisfied and get tired of him quickly. This was manipulative of Barney, and not particularly smart on his behalf. If he had known that much about the Lobster Effect, he should have also known that its effects were only temporary.
...But that didn't happen, and Barney being my favorite character, I desperately wanted him to get what (let's be honest) he deserved, even if she would not have wanted him in the first place.

I always felt that, despite their differences of opinion on kids and marriage, Robin and Ted had a deep friendship that parlayed nicely into romance.

I also recognized that friendship, but I don't think that they suited each other as anything but friends. Couples need to support each other, and Robin and Ted just don't agree enough to--but that's just my opinion. tongue

the writers always tended to emphasize the small but hugely important things

With Lily and Marshall, these things were incredible to watch, but for Ted and Tracy they are almost nonexistent. Their chemistry is noticeable, but we just don't see enough of their relationship to recognize all of these small, simple, beautiful moments.
I mean, it is obvious how much Lily and Marshall love each other, and their relationship has shown that the writers are very much capable of portraying a simple love like theirs. But they decide not to flesh out Ted and Tracy's relationship when they should have. That's the problem I have with it: compared to the other relationships on the show, especially Marshall and Lily's (and Victoria and Ted's, which was a personal favorite), we get to see this simplicity and chemistry, yet with the most important relationship in the show we see hardly anything.
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