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Author Topic: Best director of all time  (Read 882 times)
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moonbus69

Bending Unit
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« Reply #40 on: 10-06-2003 03:07 »
« Last Edit on: 10-06-2003 03:07 »

Tweek is right -- you can't say one is the best of all time. You wouldn't race a Model T Ford against a brand new Ferrari.

The most consistently good director right now has to be Unka Steve. Every movie of his I have enjoyed -- from 'Jaws' to 'Catch Me If You Can'.

Even liked A.I. so much that I got the dvd.
boingo2000

Liquid Emperor
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« Reply #41 on: 10-06-2003 09:24 »

I started making a list, but it got to long.  So I'll just name people who haven't been said yet:

Alexander Payne
Billy Wilder
Preston Sturgess (the 1st writer/director after film went to talkies)
Cameron Crowe
Savage Steve Holland
M Jackson
Professor
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« Reply #42 on: 10-06-2003 15:05 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by mazaite:
I say Terry Gilliam. He has a feel not many others can really duplicate.

I like Terry Gillaim, but i'd say he's fairly similar to Tim Burton. But they're both very talented guys with great off the wall ideas.
mazaite

Bending Unit
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« Reply #43 on: 10-06-2003 17:39 »

No i mean their actual feel and look. They are worlds apart. I like them both but Gilliam has this strange feel I haven't seen anywhere else. and as for Speilburgo and King of the world J. Cameron. They are good at big picture producing/ directing. But nothing they do really stands out from a director's standpoint. They hire great people and know how to work them but in the end they just sort of seem to be photographing other peoples work. there isn't much of themselves in their look and feel.
Sweetmelly

Bending Unit
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« Reply #44 on: 10-06-2003 17:48 »

Stanley Kubrick. 2001 and Dr. Strangelove are so perfect masterpieces that no other director could have done this movies better.
MrBurns

Bending Unit
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« Reply #45 on: 10-06-2003 20:26 »

I find it pretty hard saying to what extent a director has "made" a movie. I just can't imagine what a movie would have been like if someone else had directed it.
BumbleBeeTheta

Starship Captain
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« Reply #46 on: 10-06-2003 20:42 »

My favorite director of all time is Tim Burton.  I love all his films, even the film everyone loves to hate Planet of the Apes.  He's able to evoke so much from me, whether it's morbid laughter (Mars Attacks!, Sleepy Hollow), deep empathy (Edward Scissorhands, Ed Wood) or a childlike sense of wonder (Pee Wee's Big Adventure, Beetlejuice, Batman Returns).  I'm very eager to see Big Fish and I know he'll do great with Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.
After Burton, I love the master of neuroses, Woody Allen.  His work is just so absurd and astute at the same time.  Annie Hall is one of the greatest films of all time, as is the amazing Manhattan.  He's also great at insanely funny spoofs like What's Up, Tiger Lily? and Sleeper.  And who could forget Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex*(*But Were Afraid to Ask)?  I even like his newer films, especially Anything Else, which seems like a throwback to the days when Diane Keaton inspired fashion trends.
Other notables would be Alfred Hitchcock, Terry Gilliam, Stanley Kubrick and Steven Spielberg.

Who is Agent Codename: Dragonfly?
mazaite

Bending Unit
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« Reply #47 on: 10-07-2003 01:35 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Sweetmelly:
Stanley Kubrick. 2001 and Dr. Strangelove are so perfect masterpieces that no other director could have done this movies better.

You're right, Speilburg's A.I. proved that no other director can duplicate Kubrick. Just imagine if he lived to make that movie. I might have been able to watch it.

Michael Zaite
M Jackson
Professor
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« Reply #48 on: 10-07-2003 06:54 »

Sorry but i've got to disagree with you there. I love AI as it is. As much as I love the dark Kubrick influences (like the flesh fair, and the whole futuristic design), without Spielbergs emotional ending, it would be missing something. AI was instantly one of my favourite films, I truely think that it's perfect in every way. As brilliant as Kubricks version would have been, Spielberg made it even better. I think AI is probably the most under rated film in history, it should so clearly have won a best picture oscar, or atleast been nominated!
mikey

Urban Legend
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« Reply #49 on: 10-07-2003 06:56 »

HItchcocks got to be up there...
MrBurns

Bending Unit
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« Reply #50 on: 10-07-2003 12:34 »

I haven't seen AI yet and I think I'm not going to watch it. But telling from the ending of Minority Report, which could have been such a great movie, Spielberg isn't that good a director. Well, I don't know to what extent he is responsible for the ending, but that's just for saying he made it better than Kubrick. Well now I don't know what I wanted to say but I hope you get it.
evan

Urban Legend
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« Reply #51 on: 10-07-2003 16:48 »
« Last Edit on: 10-07-2003 16:48 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by M Jackson:
Sorry but i've got to disagree with you there. I love AI as it is. As much as I love the dark Kubrick influences (like the flesh fair, and the whole futuristic design), without Spielbergs emotional ending, it would be missing something.

Yeah, about 20 minutes of screentime.

When I first saw "A.I." in the theater, I thought it was a pretty good film. Then it just kept going on and on and on and on...way past the point where it should have stopped. We didn't need a 20 minute epilogue in which Daniel gets warm and fuzzy. It's manipulative and tacky.

I have similiar problems with Kubrick's other "half-finished" film, "Eyes Wide Shut." God, that was boring and unintentionally comical.
OC_James

Liquid Emperor
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« Reply #52 on: 10-07-2003 17:15 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by BumbleBeeTheta:
My favorite director of all time is Tim Burton.  I love all his films, even the film everyone loves to hate Planet of the Apes.  He's able to evoke so much from me, whether it's morbid laughter (Mars Attacks!, Sleepy Hollow), deep empathy (Edward Scissorhands, Ed Wood) or a childlike sense of wonder (Pee Wee's Big Adventure, Beetlejuice, Batman Returns).  I'm very eager to see Big Fish and I know he'll do great with Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

I'm a big Tim Burton fan too and I think the reason so many people disliked his remake of Planet of the Apes is because it pales in comparison to the original. The original Planet of the Apes was a sci-fi breakthrough and I think a lot of the fans of the original movie weren't comfortbale with the film being remade at all, no matter how good the remake may be.
I just hope Burton's Willy Wonka and the Chocolate factory does better.

[sig]http://img57.imageshack.us/img57/5562/epowerringanimresized4ea.gif[/sig]
"What sort of bracelet are we talking about here?!" - Professor Oak
M Jackson
Professor
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« Reply #53 on: 10-07-2003 17:18 »
« Last Edit on: 01-06-2004 00:00 by Tweek »

 
Quote
Originally posted by evan:
  Yeah, about 20 minutes of screentime.

When I first saw "A.I." in the theater, I thought it was a pretty good film. Then it just kept going on and on and on and on...way past the point where it should have stopped. We didn't need a 20 minute epilogue in which Daniel gets warm and fuzzy. It's manipulative and tacky.

"Lies! Lies and slander!"

I great and you know it!

OK, i'll calm down. But, how could you not find the ending totaly moving?! I think it rivals ET and Forest Gump for the biggest tear jerker in any film ever! I get completely absorbed in AI every time I see it. It beautiful, disturbing, original, thought provoking, and brilliant.

[UBB code Fixed]
Mr. Potter

Professor
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« Reply #54 on: 10-07-2003 17:27 »

Forrest Gump? Tearjerker? Blasphemy.
mazaite

Bending Unit
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« Reply #55 on: 10-08-2003 18:05 »
« Last Edit on: 10-08-2003 18:05 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by M Jackson:

OK, i'll calm down. But, how could you not find the ending totaly moving?!

I found it moving alright, It moved me to say out loud in a theater "Speilburg you bastard!" That tacked on emotional ending was totaly un-called for. It should have ended with the fade to black under the ocean. And as far as I'm concerned it did.


------------------
Michael Zaite
Nefnar

Professor
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« Reply #56 on: 10-22-2003 00:12 »

Orson Welles
Quentin Tarantino
Stevie Spielberg
Francis Coppola
David Lean
Britz

Starship Captain
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« Reply #57 on: 10-22-2003 02:16 »

Quentin Tarantino! Quentin Tarantino! Quentin fucking Tarantino, the greatest of all time!
Other favourites include:
Guy Ritchie
Mel Brooks
Kevin Smith
Sam Raimi
Slurm Guy

Starship Captain
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« Reply #58 on: 01-04-2004 20:45 »

I have a list!

James Cameron
Kevin Smith
Jay Roach
Robert Zemeckis
Peter Jackson
The Farrelly Bros.
Quentin Tarantino
And of course, the king, Steven Spielberg
Gocad

Space Pope
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« Reply #59 on: 01-05-2004 15:02 »

So do I!

Sergei Eisenstein
Leni Riefenstahl
Akira Kurosawa
David Lean

Steven Spielberg
George Lucas
Ridley Scott
TheLastGreatDon

Bending Unit
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« Reply #60 on: 01-06-2004 09:03 »
« Last Edit on: 01-06-2004 09:03 »

I think Quentin Tarrintino is one of the single best directors of all time because GOD says so.
wu_konguk

Urban Legend
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« Reply #61 on: 01-06-2004 09:44 »

I'll probably go with
Hayao Miyazaki
Akira Kurasowa

The most over rater dierctor has to go to Mr Speilberg. I feel his movies tack on quite alot. With both AI adn Minority Report, I felt that both of these films should of ended earlier instead of having the stupid endings. Not all movies should have a happy ending, I think some directors really have to move away from the Disney mold.
Pikka Bird

Space Pope
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« Reply #62 on: 01-07-2004 17:52 »

That has always been my main objection towards Spielberg. He just sugarcoats EVERYTHING. And it has messed up some decent films.
I thought Akira's last name was spelled Kurosawa... But I do agree that he has made some true pieces of art. Ran is probably the best King Lear of all time.
Also, I like Tarantino and Kevin Smith (esp. their sense of vivid dialogue)
Slurm Guy

Starship Captain
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« Reply #63 on: 01-07-2004 23:02 »

Yeah, Saving Private Ryan had a overly happy ending.
Sil

Professor
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« Reply #64 on: 01-08-2004 12:31 »

I am amazed that no one has mentioned Stephen Soderburgh - Traffic was amazing. And some of the crazy shots in Ocean's 11 are unbelievable.

Also Quentin Tarantino, Kenneth Branagh and Terry Gilliam (just for Brazil - if you haven't seen it, do so now).
canned eggs

Space Pope
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« Reply #65 on: 01-08-2004 14:24 »

Tsui Hark
Terry Gilliam
Kurosawa

I could also mention:
Suzuki Seijun
Anh Hung Tran
Miyazaki
Werner Herzog
Luc Besson
Tarantino

And action/kung fu movie directors:
Tsui Hark again
John Woo
Ching Siu-Tung
Yuen Woo-Ping
Lau Kar-Leung

I don't like that whole Riefenstahl/Spielberg vibe.  It seems like pandering to me, trying to coerce emotional involvement out of an audience you ought to expect will know better.  Maybe I'm a snob who's read too much R.G. Collingwood, but I prefer films to which I can have a more aesthetic reaction.  Anyway, I don't watch too many movies anymore besides kung fu movies.

canned eggs: all rights reserved, all wrongs reversed.
Slurm Guy

Starship Captain
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« Reply #66 on: 01-09-2004 23:11 »

Oh, I forgot. I also think that Fishburn does a good job.
TheLastGreatDon

Bending Unit
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« Reply #67 on: 01-10-2004 22:26 »

I agree... Fishburns directing skills are extremely adept for his limited financial support and working crew.
fryfanSpyOrama

Urban Legend
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« Reply #68 on: 06-26-2004 16:41 »
« Last Edit on: 06-26-2004 16:41 »

I'd have to go with George Lucas for the first Star Wars movie.

James Cameron for Terminator, Aliens, Titanic.

Spielberg for just about every film that I grew up watching.

Tim Burton for Batman and others

Alfred Hitchcock, for Psycho, Rear Window and The Birds.

and many more.
i_c_weiner

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #69 on: 06-18-2007 15:32 »

*Yet Another Bump*

My favorites are Orson Welles, Steven Spielberg
Francis Ford Coppola, Mel Brooks, and Woody Allen. Yet, this thread talks of the best director, which, for me, would be Spielberg. No one has had more success and no one has had more classics.
tyraniak

Urban Legend
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« Reply #70 on: 06-19-2007 01:13 »

Scorsese
Kubrick
Hitchcock
Spielberg
Wes Anderson
fryfanSpyOrama

Urban Legend
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« Reply #71 on: 06-19-2007 01:40 »

Stanley Kubrick- For his films
Peter Jackson- For King Kong and LOTR
Orson Welles- For Citizen Kane
Woody Allen- For his films
Mel Brooks- For his films
Oliver Stone- For JFK

MrBlonde

Liquid Emperor
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« Reply #72 on: 06-19-2007 08:52 »

I can't believe so many people think Spielberg is one of the best directors of all time. The only good movie he's made was Schindler's List.


Kubrick for A Clockwork Orange. I'm a bit biased for Stanley Kubrick since he made A Clockwork Orange.
~FazeShift~

Moderator
DOOP Ubersecretary
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« Reply #73 on: 06-19-2007 09:38 »

Michael Mann is pretty damn awesome, he makes everything look so cool.
SlackJawedMoron

Urban Legend
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« Reply #74 on: 06-19-2007 10:39 »

Yeah, but Miami Vice (the film) sucked noodles. I mean, it looked cool, but it sucked noodles.
MrBlonde

Liquid Emperor
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« Reply #75 on: 06-19-2007 10:43 »

Heat and The Insider were great movies. Hell, even Collateral had it's moments.
~FazeShift~

Moderator
DOOP Ubersecretary
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« Reply #76 on: 06-19-2007 10:52 »

I liked them all, even Vice Vice, Baby (how cool was that badguy?)
newhook_1

Urban Legend
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« Reply #77 on: 06-19-2007 11:34 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by MrBlonde:
I can't believe so many people think Spielberg is one of the best directors of all time. The only good movie he's made was Schindler's List.

His recent stuff hasn't been as good, but  what about Raiders of the Lost Ark? Jurassic Park? Jaws? E.T.? Saving Private Ryan? None of those were any good? News to me.
bored idiot

Delivery Boy
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« Reply #78 on: 06-19-2007 12:42 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by newhook_1:
 His recent stuff hasn't been as good, but  what about Raiders of the Lost Ark? Jurassic Park? Jaws? E.T.? Saving Private Ryan? None of those were any good? News to me.

this post reminded me that i am probably the only person on this website to like war of the worlds. ah, well, it was tons better than independence day.

but anyway, two favorite directors are terrence malick (thin red line is easily my all time favorite film), clint eastwood (letters from iwo jima), and peter weir (witness and gallipoli). can't stand any quentin tarantino after pulp fiction and have never really been able to stand kevin smith. the guy named his daughter after a comic book character. she's gonna have some scars.
CrapBag

Liquid Emperor
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« Reply #79 on: 06-19-2007 13:02 »

George Lucas.
Kevin Smith- Although he is much more than just a director.
Mel Brooks- Same way as Kevin Smith.
And Francis Ford Coppola.

Those are my favorites.
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