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PEEL - The Futurama Message Board    It's got a TV!    Talk about Lazerdisk. « previous next »
Author Topic: Talk about Lazerdisk.  (Read 904 times)
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winna

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« on: 01-14-2011 04:02 »

I have a smalle lazerdisk collection:

Bladerunner
Se7en


I'm thinking about expanding it one day and also getting a lazerdisk player. smile

Btw, is it Lazerdisk, or Laserdisk?  or perhaps Laserdisc?
Bend-err

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« Reply #1 on: 01-14-2011 04:08 »

it's LaserDisc
Christopher

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« Reply #2 on: 01-14-2011 04:21 »

Can I buy Bladerunner from you
homerjaysimpson

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« Reply #3 on: 01-14-2011 05:31 »
« Last Edit on: 01-14-2011 05:35 »



Huge discs are huge!

Also What about this crap?:

El-Man

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« Reply #4 on: 01-14-2011 07:35 »

LaserDisc? For a minute there I thought someone had bumped this thread from the early 1980's.
futurefreak

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« Reply #5 on: 01-14-2011 12:16 »

Legwarmer bump! Nice.

winna

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« Reply #6 on: 01-14-2011 13:10 »

Can I buy Bladerunner from you

No.  But we can watch it together. smile
homerjaysimpson

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« Reply #7 on: 01-14-2011 16:33 »

Did that shirt say Elton John?
Tweek

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« Reply #8 on: 01-14-2011 18:29 »

Did that shirt say Elton John?


It says Newton-John, as in Olivia Newton-John.
El-Man

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« Reply #9 on: 01-14-2011 23:50 »

You can still get LaserDisc players, but you'd better act fast to enjoy your movies. Fifty years from now your grandkids will be discovering the player in the attic.
Free Hot Meal

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« Reply #10 on: 01-15-2011 00:23 »

Just like 8-track players....though these were around a lot longer than LaserDics (to my knowledge).

Which is larger, a LaserDisk or standard size record? (just curious)
El-Man

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« Reply #11 on: 01-15-2011 01:37 »

Laserdiscs have a 30cm (11.81 inches) diameter. LP records were made in either 10 or 12 inch. So the winner is LP records, by a nose.
winna

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« Reply #12 on: 01-15-2011 14:48 »

LPs are the winner and simultaneously the loser!

You can still get LaserDisc players, but you'd better act fast to enjoy your movies. Fifty years from now your grandkids will be discovering the player in the attic.

Time is a harsh imaginary mistress.
Tachyon

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« Reply #13 on: 01-15-2011 18:35 »

A friend at work has something like four hundred LaserDiscs and five or six players.  He was semi-famous in AV forums for epic rants ragging on DVDs (compression is the work of the devil, horrid audio, etc).

He eventually came around to the Dark Side when he experienced DTS soundtracks.  Now of course he is big into Blu-Ray.  He also collects films... as in 35mm shown-in-the-theater type films.
futurefreak

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« Reply #14 on: 01-24-2011 10:02 »

I remember my 7th grade history teacher showed us videos on laserdisc (so year 1999) and we were all like whoa, cool! Kicks the ass of our vhs players!
Free Hot Meal

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« Reply #15 on: 01-25-2011 09:12 »

I saw them in 6th grade Science class.  The remote to work the player was about as big as the disks and it seemed like there were many, many flaws.  We were like, wow, why are we still using records?  Does anyone need a shiny plate for lunch?


Remember in elementary school, slide show presentations?  Or better yet, the National Geographic ones with the audio tapes that would let you know when to change slides?

*BEEP*
ShepherdofShark

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« Reply #16 on: 01-25-2011 11:58 »

I have the LaserDisc Star Wars Trilogy on DVDs. So it's all before Lucas messed around with it, which means boxes around the TIE fighters in A New Hope and translucent Snow Speeder cockpits in Empire. big grin

But the amazing thing is that the Battle of Endor is still faultless.
winna

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« Reply #17 on: 01-25-2011 13:55 »

Laserdiscs are pretty cool... but sometimes eyht rot. frown
homerjaysimpson

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« Reply #18 on: 01-25-2011 15:40 »



So do DVDs!
Xanfor

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« Reply #19 on: 01-25-2011 20:42 »

None of your lousy digital formats compete at all with the quality and clarity of Betamax!
CommanderZapp

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« Reply #20 on: 01-26-2011 11:10 »

None of your lousy digital formats compete at all with the quality and clarity of Betamax!
Second.
Tachyon

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« Reply #21 on: 01-26-2011 15:46 »
« Last Edit on: 01-26-2011 15:50 »

None of your lousy digital formats compete at all with the quality and clarity of Betamax!

I enjoyed my SL-HF 900 back in the day



I mostly used the 900 for recording CDs.  It's digital audio quality was impressive, but SuperBeta video didn't come close to LaserDisc.
FishyJoe

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« Reply #22 on: 02-07-2011 15:14 »

I saw them in 6th grade Science class.  The remote to work the player was about as big as the disks and it seemed like there were many, many flaws.  We were like, wow, why are we still using records?  Does anyone need a shiny plate for lunch?


Remember in elementary school, slide show presentations?  Or better yet, the National Geographic ones with the audio tapes that would let you know when to change slides?

*BEEP*


I love this post. I had the same experience! Laserdisc in science class was hilarious! The teachers never knew how to work the things. They'd lecture for a little bit about simple machines--then struggle with the remote for about 20 minutes, eventually finally getting it to work--and then we'd watch a 5 second clip of a lever going up and down. And then they would move on to the next topic. It was so ridiculous and clunky.

And yes, the filmstrips with the "BEEP!" were awesome too. I miss those. The teachers would call on a student to control the film strip...and there'd always be one kid who just couldn't handle it. He'd be several seconds late, flipping to the next screen after each "beep". Or he'd accidentally flip backwards instead of forwards, and everyone in the class would start yelling. Fun times.
Tweek

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« Reply #23 on: 02-07-2011 20:38 »

I still have a Sony SL-C6UB, I don't think it works any more though tongue

winna

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« Reply #24 on: 02-07-2011 22:03 »

That doesn't look like a Laserdisc player.  You are deliberately posting betamax in the most inappropriate place. frown
Free Hot Meal

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« Reply #25 on: 02-13-2011 10:37 »

I saw them in 6th grade Science class.  The remote to work the player was about as big as the disks and it seemed like there were many, many flaws.  We were like, wow, why are we still using records?  Does anyone need a shiny plate for lunch?


Remember in elementary school, slide show presentations?  Or better yet, the National Geographic ones with the audio tapes that would let you know when to change slides?

*BEEP*


I love this post. I had the same experience! Laserdisc in science class was hilarious! The teachers never knew how to work the things. They'd lecture for a little bit about simple machines--then struggle with the remote for about 20 minutes, eventually finally getting it to work--and then we'd watch a 5 second clip of a lever going up and down. And then they would move on to the next topic. It was so ridiculous and clunky.

And yes, the filmstrips with the "BEEP!" were awesome too. I miss those. The teachers would call on a student to control the film strip...and there'd always be one kid who just couldn't handle it. He'd be several seconds late, flipping to the next screen after each "beep". Or he'd accidentally flip backwards instead of forwards, and everyone in the class would start yelling. Fun times.

Exactly!  Are you sure we were not in the same grade together?  lol
I really only remember Laserdics that one year (6th grade).  Maybe after 1 year, the science teachers got so fed up with them, they threw them all away.  Remember those "older" TVs that were strapped down on those huge carts?  Those I remember my whole grade school experience.  In 12th grade science class (my teacher was really easy going), we rigged up some "bunny ears" to the TV (with tin foil hanging off of them in order to get better reception) and watched the NCAA March Madness College Basketball tournament.  What fun that was.

Sometimes, a kid would get too anxious about being the kid that forgot to change the slide, that they would anticipate the BEEP...usually, that resulted in the slide being changed too fast as the announcer was just taking a breath and still had a minute to go on the slide.
Speaking of things from elementary school...One of the coolest things I remember from elementary school was the time an artist came.  During his presentation, he painted to music on a huge canvas.  However, he did not straight-up paint.  He would start painting one thing, and then later, he would morph what he originally painted into something else (this presentation went on for about 30-45 minutes...or so it seemed).  So you never knew what the final product was until he completely finished.  That painting is still hanging in my elementary school somewhere.
winna

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« Reply #26 on: 02-13-2011 20:08 »

Wanna go steal it?
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