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Author Topic: Obscure Sci-Fi knowledge  (Read 1912 times)
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PEE Poll: Obscure Sci-Fi knowledge
Star Trek (including all series')   -10 (20.8%)
Stargate   -0 (0%)
Star Wars   -9 (18.8%)
Stargate SG1   -1 (2.1%)
Red Dwarf   -6 (12.5%)
Lexx   -0 (0%)
Babylon 5   -3 (6.3%)
Blade Runner   -2 (4.2%)
The X- Files   -2 (4.2%)
Futurama (Yaaay!)   -15 (31.3%)
Total Voters: 48

scruffy_91

Crustacean
*
« Reply #120 on: 04-03-2005 14:25 »

futurama is awesome but i would have liked to see "battle star galactica" up there...
Capīn Skusting

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #121 on: 04-04-2005 21:40 »
« Last Edit on: 04-04-2005 21:40 »

I remember Billy West first from doing his Larry Fine empression on the Howard Stern Show.

Star Wars isn't really Sci-Fi. There's no science in it.
It's an action adventure fantasy.

Everybody has seen the THX logo at the beginning of Lucas' films and others.
This name was taken from Lucas' first film THX 1138

In American Graffiti, THX 138 is the license plate on John Milner's (played by Paul Le Mat) car. There is a Special Thanks credit to Paul on the featurette Empire of Dreams included on the recent Star Wars Trilogy DVD set.
In Star Wars A New Hope, a guard says "transfer the prisoners to cell 1138" or something like that.
Later in American Graffiti, Milner street races Bob Falfa (played by Harrison Ford).
Falfa's plate was GLD 204.
This is rumored to stand for George Lucas, Director. The same plate was also used on a brown Plymouth elsewhere in the movie.


fryfanSpyOrama

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #122 on: 05-30-2005 01:30 »

Billy Dee Williams who played Harvey Dent in the 1989 movie Batman was under contract to play in "Batman Returns".  He was supposed to have been scared by Catwoman and become Two Face in "Batman Forever".  However, due to issues with the studio, Williams was replaced by Christopher Walken, who played a different character in "Returns".  And Warner Bros. had to pay Billy Dee Williams a lot of money to buy out the contract so Tommy Lee Jones could play Harvey Dent/Two Face in "Forever".
Pikka Bird

Space Pope
****
« Reply #123 on: 05-30-2005 08:32 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Cap'n Skusting:
Star Wars isn't really Sci-Fi. There's no science in it.

Bogus! If that's true, then there's almost no science fiction in the world. SW has explanations of how almost everything works. It may be fantasy science, but most other sci-fi movies explain nothing whatsoever. At least it isn't like Star Trek where they try (and fail) to make it seem plausible by name-dropping expressions from the world of physics. If Star Trek's bullshit is sci-fi, then Star Wars' is as well.
Prof. Wernstrum

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #124 on: 05-30-2005 09:06 »

In total there have been 554 episodes of Star Trek and 10 movies. To watch them all non-stop would take about 18 days.

In all that time, the phrase "Beam me up, Scotty" was never said once.

R2-D2 stands for "Reel 2, Dialogue 2", a tape which went missing during the production of American Graffiti.

Fox Mulder was named after Chris Carter's (Creator of The X-Files) childhood friend "Fox" and his mother's maiden name "Mulder".

The first alteration that George Lucas made to Star Wars happened way back in 1978 when it gained the subtitle "Episode IV: A New Hope". The original theatrical release was simply called "Star Wars".
Pikka Bird

Space Pope
****
« Reply #125 on: 05-30-2005 10:01 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Prof. Wernstrum:
R2-D2 stands for "Reel 2, Dialogue 2", a tape which went missing during the production of American Graffiti.

A widely believed, yet untruthful anecdote, that one.
Wooter

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #126 on: 05-30-2005 11:02 »

Star Wars is not Science Fiction, but it is Sci-Fi. There is a difference. Science Fiction in it's purest form is quite rare, and examples include Isaac Asimov and Arthur C. Clarke. They require expanation on how the futuristic things work in a scientifically feasable manner. Sci-Fi is usually adventure set in a Science Fiction backdrop. It does not require the explanations.

However, seeing as how any technology of significant advancement is indestinguishable from magic, (I think I messed up that quote a little.) even things like Wizards and The Force can be explained scientifically, if you use you imagination to its fullest. If all else fails, go with the "nanites" expanation. You'd be suprised how much microscopic robots can explain.
Pikka Bird

Space Pope
****
« Reply #127 on: 05-31-2005 08:30 »

In think that line is very thin. Monomolecular, even. Everything that has only been thought of and not built and put to effective use is just imagination, including most of what Asimov and Clarke wrote. To invent an abstract concept is different than creating the actual technology that carries it. So by implication, there is no "science fiction" by that definition.
But actually, you just have to analyse the terme a little. Fiction = stuff that has been thought up. Science fiction = scientific fiction = stuff that has been thought up, eg. it doesn't have to make sense or be possible.
SlackJawedMoron

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #128 on: 05-31-2005 08:33 »

Speculative Fiction is the blanket term for all them made up things (ie. horror, fantasy, sci-fi etc).

Those labels exist mainly to help book store clerks group novels together.  tongue
Col. Klink

Professor
*
« Reply #129 on: 05-31-2005 08:55 »

Science Fiction is not about technology, Thats just an offshoot of what SCi-Fi is. ITs about speculating  about the future, Where we're headed, and so By Proxy its about society in the present.

Star wars is set in the past, it doesn't speculate about the future. The closes star wars gets to Sci-Fi is its lame George Bush Comparisons.
Pikka Bird

Space Pope
****
« Reply #130 on: 05-31-2005 11:24 »

Confer with your dictionary... where does it say that sceince is synonymous with future? Nowhere, that's where.
Prof. Wernstrum

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #131 on: 05-31-2005 17:19 »

This debate kind of reminds me of a quote by Terry Pratchett about how the only way we can define science-fiction is "It's what I'm pointing at when I use the term".
David A

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #132 on: 05-31-2005 17:47 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Wooter:
Star Wars is not Science Fiction, but it is Sci-Fi. There is a difference. Science Fiction in it's purest form is quite rare, and examples include Isaac Asimov and Arthur C. Clarke. They require expanation on how the futuristic things work in a scientifically feasable manner. Sci-Fi is usually adventure set in a Science Fiction backdrop. It does not require the explanations.

No, sci-fi is just an abbreviation for science fiction.  However, there are several sub-genres within the genre of science fiction.  The Asimov and Clarke stuff you're talking about is hard science fiction.  Star Wars is space opera.

 
Quote
However, seeing as how any technology of significant advancement is indestinguishable from magic, (I think I messed up that quote a little.) even things like Wizards and The Force can be explained scientifically, if you use you imagination to its fullest. If all else fails, go with the "nanites" expanation. You'd be suprised how much microscopic robots can explain.

The quote that you're looking for is "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."  However, Star Wars is not an example of this.  In Star Wars advanced technology coexists with actual magic.

Speak softly. Drive a Sherman tank.
Prof. Wernstrum

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #133 on: 06-05-2005 07:41 »

In the original script for Planet of the Apes, when Charlton Heston found the Statue of Librety he simply says "My God". The line "Damn them! Damn them all to Hell!" was an ad-lib and one which got in trouble with the censors because of rules about the use of the word "Damn". It was successfully argued that this word was not being used as a random expletive but was being used literally with the human calling upon God to condemn the apes and so the line stayed in.
fryfanSpyOrama

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #134 on: 06-11-2005 21:44 »
« Last Edit on: 06-11-2005 21:44 »

George Lucas has said the original Planet of the Apes, was one of the science fiction films that help him to mold Star Wars.  Planet of the Apes was based on the novel written by Pierre Boulle.  He also wrote The Bridge on the River Kwai which was made into a movie in 1954 and it featured Obi-Wan Kenobi himself, Sir Alec Guinness.
SlackJawedMoron

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #135 on: 06-11-2005 22:07 »

What a staggering collection of pointless coincidences.
Pikka Bird

Space Pope
****
« Reply #136 on: 06-13-2005 15:33 »

@Wernstrum: So the censorship would only leave it in if the apes were the damnees, although Mr. Heston is clearly condemning the humans of yore who had their finger on the big red button? Damn them! Damn them all to Hell! How can they be so gullible.
David A

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #137 on: 06-14-2005 04:15 »

Yes, Chuck's character was condemning the humans, not the apes; but what Wernstrum is saying is that it got past the censors because he was using the word in a literal sense, not as an expletive.
Pikka Bird

Space Pope
****
« Reply #138 on: 06-14-2005 09:40 »

Yes, he did say that. But he also said that the apes were to be damned...

Captain Lochley (Tracy Scoggins) from B5 appeared as the ancient immortal Cassandra on "Highlander: the Series". Disgusting.
David A

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #139 on: 06-14-2005 14:20 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Pikka Bird:
Yes, he did say that. But he also said that the apes were to be damned...

Well, he was mistaken about that part, or else he just got confused and typed the wrong thing.  I was going to point that out, but you beat me to it.

Anyway, I think that the point that he was making was that the censors allowed the line because of the way the word was used.  It had nothing to do with the subject being humans or apes.

 
Quote
Captain Lochley (Tracy Scoggins) from B5 appeared as the ancient immortal Cassandra on "Highlander: the Series". Disgusting.

She also played Cat Grant, on Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman.

The Highlander TV series sucked.  So did all the sequels.  There can be only one.
fryfanSpyOrama

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #140 on: 06-18-2005 02:18 »
« Last Edit on: 06-18-2005 02:18 »

William Wisher Jr. co-writer of the first two Terminator movies has made cameos in both those films.

He was the cop that the Terminator banged the head with the police car outside the TechNoir nightclub and he was the man holding a camera in the galleria, in T2.

He has also co-wrote the recent Exorcist prequels.
fryfanSpyOrama

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #141 on: 06-26-2005 01:43 »

X-File's David Duchovny turned down a role in Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones to do Evolution.
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