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Author Topic: Who's the worst character?  (Read 31320 times)
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Gorky

Space Pope
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« Reply #720 on: 11-24-2011 04:31 »

Very well-said, spira. I totally agree with your take on the situation (but that shouldn't surprise you).

For my part, though (and I'm speaking as a big ol' Leela fan), I personally don't find Leela unlikeable in BBS, exactly. I find some of her behavior sort of callous, but I don't fault her for dating Lars over Fry. Flaunting the relationship was most uncool, but that's just what Leela does. She's always been one to brag about the men in her life (see also: Alcazar, Adlai, Chaz), which I think is a product of her own self-esteem issues--she's been conditioned to view herself as someone who is in some ways unworthy of male attention because she's got this monstery-looking eye (and some major abandonment issues). So of course she's going to be psyched when a man shows an interest in her.

And, on that note, I think her braggart-y behavior in BBS is more justified than it was with any of the other douchebags she'd dated in the past precisely because Lars was such a good guy. I don't know, it's kind of nice to see Leela being treated well by someone who genuinely loves her. (Of course, Fry genuinely loves her as well, and yet she's mostly indifferent to him throughout the movie. But it's unfair to blame Leela for not loving Fry simply because he loves her. Leela deserves to be with someone she genuinely cares about, just as Fry deserves to be with someone who genuinely cares about him.)
spira

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #721 on: 11-24-2011 05:17 »

I'm shocked. Nope, not really.

Yeah, it isn't although her behavior re Lars is unprecedented. I agree that it's more justifiable with Lars because he actually treats her well. She is finally truly happy with Lars, but, being imperfect, she just doesn't know how to express this without hurting Fry to some degree (and even if she was more relationship savvy, there's no way to prevent some of the pain Fry goes through as a result of her love for Lars). I know that's something I can understand and relate to, having hurt people in the past in a similar manner. Sure, the way she acts when she's with a guy isn't likable. But I like her character exactly because she's not likable all of the time. She has serious flaws (as a person, not as a character). And I think what gives Futurama its trademark heart - and what keeps intelligent fans interested - is its collection of characters who aren't flat and who do have major weaknesses and who seem real.

I like that you brought up the abandonment and self-esteem issues because yeah, she does have those things and they do affect her behavior especially with guys and though often this is portrayed in a humorous or hyperbolic way, it's fundamentally very real. For being an animated sit-com, Futurama tackles pretty serious matters with its characters and that's one of the reasons it's so meaningful and resonant to its viewers.

It's not even that Leela doesn't care about Fry in BBS. She's just captivated by Lars. This is such a human thing that everyone falls victim to - you find one new person (or hobby, or television series, or whatever) who you instantly fall for and suddenly you find yourself forgetting all of your old friends and interests. Especially in BBS, we don't see things from Leela's perspective enough to judge her fairly. The way I look at it, all of her BBS actions are human and justifiable - not necessary likable, but not completely illogical and not "wrong".
Inquisitor Hein
Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #722 on: 11-24-2011 09:56 »
« Last Edit on: 11-24-2011 12:46 »

Well..the "unlikedness" in certain episodes is more plausible when not a real difference is made between Leela's "deliberate" actions and the situation the writers put her in. E.g. when Fry screws up, the writers usually find enough time to show the lesson learned and for an apology. With Leela, the opportunity to apologize to Fry after a complete messup strangely seems to pass her by quite often.

E.g. "My three suns":
- A big deal was made out of Fry drinking careless out of a bottle (normal human need), and for the consequences he could hardly have foreseen. The plot did end with a punishment and a "deserved lesson learned".
- "The Sting": Leela did not act out of carelessness, but after deliberate consideration decided -with obvious consequences- to risk/sacrifice anyone's life for her own profiligation. When waking up from a coma, critizing her immediatelly for her screwup might not have been the right time. But yet, for far bigger screwup than Fry's, the opportunity for an apology passed her by, allowing that character to get away with a "Ooooh...you poor girl, you need a hug".

Or e.g. "Into the Wild Green Yonder": Fry kept silent to protect Leela, while Leela kidnapped him, imprisoned him (and it was not mentioned what the Feministas would have done with their prisoners in the long run...planned livelong imprisonment probably an option), threatened Fry with a gun and brought the archvillain to the showdown herself.
THAT would normally have required (compared to the standards put on other characters) such a big "Sorry" that would have been the verbal equivalent of dropping to the knees and pleading forgiveness. Of course, in the "last minute, now or never" aspect of the chase there was conveniently no opportunity for Leela to apologize.

To cut a long story short:
In the long running audiences perception, it does not make too much of a difference wether Leela refuses to apologize or is too often put in a situation where no apology is possible. Both create the impression of a character "refusing to apologize for mistakes, because she thinks/is treated like someone better than the rest".
(Of course it's obvious that this is not the way the writers do wish to characterise Leela....)

Or, to transfer that on BBS:
Sure Leela cannot force herself to love Fry, nor was there any opportunity for her to make a sacrifice for Fry's happiness. But -in most viewer's perception- the missing opportunity to make a sacrifice for Fry's happiness and the refusal to make such a sacrifice are often seen as the same.
Gorky

Space Pope
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« Reply #723 on: 11-24-2011 13:43 »

Especially in BBS, we don't see things from Leela's perspective enough to judge her fairly.

Again, spira, your entire post was kick-ass. But this point in particular I'd like to elaborate on. What you're saying here is so true: Fry is given this big ol' character arc, where he goes from desperately loving Leela to attempting to sabotage her relationship to understanding that her own happiness comes before his own; he goes from being a whiny little child to a (slightly more) mature and caring adult.

Leela, meanwhile, seems pretty static throughout the movie, at least regarding her feelings towards Fry. There's no ambivalence on her part, no conflict about starting a relationship with Lars when she knows Fry is into her. She's committed to Lars throughout the movie and does not seem to mind at all that she's hurting Fry (again: this should not be her primary concern, and she's not doing it maliciously--but the movie never makes this a hundred percent clear, and leaves a lot of room for fans to misinterpret her actions as simple bitchiness and hold them against her). The only scene that comes close to explaining Leela's mental/emotional state is that night she spends with Lars in the Head Museum (suddenly that phrase sounds really dirty to me), where she starts crying and says that her life is changing so fast and she doesn't know who she is anymore. That's just such a vague statement, and though I've always interpreted it to mean that Leela's feeling a little weird about abandoning her friends and falling headlong into this super-duper committed relationship with Lars, the movie (again) never makes her meaning perfectly clear.

It's easy to get Fry's meaning when he says, "I've loved Leela ever since the day I came to the future"; it's not as easy to get Leela's meaning when she says, "My life is changing so fast. I don't know who I am anymore." The movie is mostly told from Fry's point-of-view, and for that reason manages to generate more concrete sympathy for his character than it does for Leela's. That's not a flaw, exactly, and it actually makes me appreciate both Leela and the film a bit more (because things are left sort of open to obsessive analyzing interpretation)--but it certainly doesn't help to make Leela likable for those fans who aren't so thrilled about her character in the first place.

Well..the "unlikedness" in certain episodes is more plausible when not a real difference is made between Leela's "deliberate" actions and the situation the writers put her in. E.g. when Fry screws up, the writers usually find enough time to show the lesson learned and for an apology. With Leela, the opportunity to apologize to Fry after a complete messup strangely seems to pass her by quite often.

Isn't that just a common problem in sitcoms in general? The nagging, always-right woman is an archetype, just like the bumbling, always-wrong man is. We're usually made to feel like the more logical person in any given situation (in your "My Three Suns" example, Leela is undoubtedly acting much more rationally than Fry is; even after he drinks the emperor and receives a verbal smackdown, she still does the appropriate research to determine that, hey, Fry's life is probably in danger and he should probably cut and run) is also the correct one--and so, by episode's end, the careful woman is rewarded and the impulsive, wrongheaded man is condemned.

I'm not saying this is right, from a moral or emotional or what-have-you perspective, but I do think it's a common story arc on shows like Futurama (the Simpsons does it a lot, too, with Homer and Marge).

Quote
- "The Sting": Leela did not act out of carelessness, but after deliberate consideration decided -with obvious consequences- to risk/sacrifice anyone's life for her own profiligation. When waking up from a coma, critizing her immediatelly for her screwup might not have been the right time. But yet, for far bigger screwup than Fry's, the opportunity for an apology passed her by, allowing that character to get away with a "Ooooh...you poor girl, you need a hug".

I think that's a little harsh. I could be wrong, but I doubt many viewers were angry with Leela at the end of that episode. Nothing in the episode indicated to us as viewers that we were supposed to be critical of Leela--precisely because she was so critical of herself. She knew Fry's death was her fault, and blamed herself accordingly. That counts just as much to me as would an apology.

Quote
Or e.g. "Into the Wild Green Yonder": Fry kept silent to protect Leela, while Leela kidnapped him, imprisoned him (and it was not mentioned what the Feministas would have done with their prisoners in the long run...planned livelong imprisonment probably an option), threatened Fry with a gun and brought the archvillain to the showdown herself.

Again, this doesn't bother me. Leela genuinely thought that Fry was acting against her throughout the movie--and, it's worth noting, she trusted him right up until that moment when they meet at the Keeler crater and the Nimbus shows up to take Leela away; I would have found the timing of that all a bit suspicious as well if I were her. But, in the end, she makes the right decision by trusting Fry and allowing him to set off that bomb. No apology necessary, I don't think; Leela wasn't acting maliciously, but from a place of emotional hurt and betrayal--and, when it comes down to it, she chooses her faith in Fry over her dedication to Saving the Universe.

Also: Leela has apologized for her actions in the past, though it's true that these apologies are often not made to Fry. Like, she tells her parents she's sorry for getting them kidnapped by an evil villain who tried to feed them to piranhas in "Less Than Hero." And, hey, she apologizes to Fry several times in the original run, just not using so many words: in "The Cyber House Rules" she admits Adlai was a jerk and thus vindicates Fry; in "The Why of Fry" she tells him that it doesn't matter if he's not the most important person in the universe and admits that she's happy to see him--which, again, is mighty validating for Fry.

I'm not saying that I disagree with you completely, Hein--and you do offer a compelling argument for why people might not find Leela such an appealing character--but I think you may be oversimplifying things a bit. You can apologize to someone without actually saying that you're sorry--and, for me at least, I find that perfectly acceptable and don't hold it against the character doing the apologizing. 
Inquisitor Hein
Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #724 on: 11-24-2011 14:57 »
« Last Edit on: 11-24-2011 17:14 »

Quote
I think that's a little harsh. I could be wrong, but I doubt many viewers were angry with Leela at the end of that episode. Nothing in the episode indicated to us as viewers that we were supposed to be critical of Leela--precisely because she was so critical of herself. She knew Fry's death was her fault, and blamed herself accordingly. That counts just as much to me as would an apology.

I think it's not even harsh enough;) Sure, the viewers were not supposed to be angry at Leela. But for risiking everyone's live, too eagerly willing to abandon Bender, they SHOULD have been.
Also, Leela's self-blame was imhO aimed at the wrong direction. When Fry messed up in MTS, it was "Look at that idiot, he nearly got Leela killed. BAD!BAD!!". In "The Sting", it was more "Ohhh...just because she thinks she killed Fry, the poor girl is sad." The viewers were supposed to feel much more sorry over Leelas sadness than over Fry's death (that was at least my impression).

Despite the fact that Leela is supposed to be an ass-kicker/name-taker, the writers imhO too often grant her lenient consequences using the "oooh..the poor girl" refugee.
And that is not the writing on an ass-kicker/name-taker/leader, but rather on a raisin picker. (Wants to act like a man, but carry consequences like a helpless, to be protected little girl).


Or to get back to "The Sting":
- A little helpless girl messing up, not knowing better: Feels sorry over her mistake, and the "Now, now, no harm done, stop crying" can be applied.
- A natural leader -who should show the most responsibility for her actions- must face the consequences of her actions.
- But a natural leader, granted refugee from consequences on that "Ohh...stop crying, you poor little girl, not too much harm done"...well...these two things just do not fit.

Well...I must admit I might be a bit overpicky regarding those details. I still stick to the old martial artist saying "Hard enough to hit? Hard enough to GET hit!", so -when a character seems to get a special treatment to get away more lenient than others- that's the kind of storywriting I immediatelly dislike wink
El-Man

Urban Legend
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« Reply #725 on: 11-24-2011 15:59 »

THAT would normally have required (compared to the standards put on other characters) such a big "Sorry" that would have been the verbal equivalent of dropping to the knees and pleading forgiveness.

I did have a fic idea that resolved this and the fate of the other Feministas, but never got the chance to write it before Season 6 was released. Now I'm too busy with other stuff and still writing ITWWY, so it probably will never happen...
Inquisitor Hein
Liquid Emperor
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« Reply #726 on: 11-24-2011 16:27 »
« Last Edit on: 11-24-2011 17:21 »

Quote
I did have a fic idea that resolved this and the fate of the other Feministas
I also have a little cartoon planned about this one wink
After all, it was Leela's leadership that turned a group of nagging, but harmless goodminds (who were considered a mere nuisance, not to be taken serious) into a group of wanted terrorists sentenced to most of their lives in prison. So, it seems quite unfair that Leela got away, while other ones were left behind, carrying the consequences of her actions.

Again, they made a big fuzz with Leela taking over leadership, how successful the Feministas sabotage actions had become, how Leela got cheered upon by the other Feministas. A big deal so long as things worked out well...

But in court, did we hear a "that was my idea alone, the others just did what I told them?" (that sentence did describe her involvment quite well smile ) And in the prison break, Leela was rather "Each one for herself", and the fastest runner. Not turning her head once for those who stayed behind.
spira

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #727 on: 11-24-2011 17:32 »

Yeah, Gorks, that's exactly what I was thinking about BBS.

When Fry messed up in MSS, it was "Look at that idiot, he nearly got Leela killed. BAD!BAD!!".

Do you mean My Three Suns? (If not, I'm not sure what you're talking about...) Anyways, I never got that impression. It was more "Look at that idiot, he didn't follow instructions and now we're all boned." Ever since episode 2, Leela's been irritated (and rightly so, she is the captain) when people disobey her, which is exactly what Fry did. The way she sees it, Fry deliberately disobeyed her, and he's not exactly repentant about it either. If you're talking about the end of the episode, his feeling guilty for getting Leela killed is obviously justifiable. What were you expecting, him to be all, "Ah, whatever. She yelled at me. She's mean. I don't mind that she died, especially not because she died while trying to rescue me." Two totally different levels there.

In The Sting, I'm not sure where you wanted the direct "I'm sorry" that you seem to think is necessary for any sort of apology to be said. It doesn't really make any sense during her hallucinations, and I think what goes in on the last minute of that episode is far more resonant and meaningful than Leela apologizing would be. Viewers get that she feels absolutely terrible, she doesn't need to say it out loud, especially since Fry doesn't seem really perturbed by the whole thing. Also, after the honey thing, she does say, "Fry, I'm so glad I didn't kill you." Which you could take as a self-centered statement or something, but it sounds pretty apologetic to me.

I'm also not sure that Leela gets "special treatment" at any point in that episode. Sure, the professor comforts her when she's sobbing her eye out at the funeral, but even he gives the whole "I'm lying to make her feel better!" thing. If none of them showed concern for Leela during her delusions, that would say worse things about their characters than about her. I think Leela toughs it out on her own in that episode. See: the whole last scene in her bedroom before she wakes up.

The viewers were supposed to feel much more sorry over Leelas sadness than over Fry's death (that was at least my impression).

Maybe, but it's also true that Fry didn't actually die. And viewers, knowing that this show is episodic and everything will be all right in the end, kind of knew that going into the episode. "The Sting" is a Leela-centric episode. It's about Leela's reaction to Fry's death, not about Fry's death itself. To make that story more interesting, Leela has to be the one to kill Fry. And that also isn't out-of-character for her - she is always wanting to do the job and do it well and has before and will again put others in peril. (Mobius Dick? Although in that one, I think she repents well enough for her misdeeds by saving everyone.)

In the long running audiences perception, it does not make too much of a difference wether Leela refuses to apologize or is too often put in a situation where no apology is possible. Both create the impression of a character "refusing to apologize for mistakes, because she thinks/is treated like someone better than the rest".

I don't think overall she's treated better than any of the rest of the crew. How many times does Bender get away with heinous crimes and general being-a-jerk? How many times is Fry allowed to be mopey and incompetent? Gorky pointed out some of the times she has directly apologized for her wrongdoing. And honestly, I feel she deserves apologies from Fry about as much as he does from her. He's stalkerish and obsessive and incompetent... There was a thread somewhere a few months back that compared all of the crap that Fry and Leela have done to each other and basically concluded that while Leela's transgressions have been a bit more egregious, Fry's have been more numerous. And it's not like he frequently directly apologizes to her, either. Which is okay, because the two of them are friends and understand that both of them screw up a lot. They may not be keen to apologize to each other, but they are eager to forgive each other, which makes for a more interesting dynamic between them.
Inquisitor Hein
Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #728 on: 11-24-2011 19:09 »
« Last Edit on: 11-24-2011 19:21 »

@Spira>ImhO, you are going much deeper into the plot than I expected for that comparison smile Sure, in the end scene of "The Sting", there was not really room for an apology. But it's the writers job to make sure a statement "I completely messed up and learned my lesson" is possible at all.

Let us assume we just have those plot outlines, and have to write a plot around that.

a)
Fry's mistake: Carelessness (drinking the bottle because of being thirsty, not to disobey an order. Not too much time to think about it).
Leela's mistake: Deliberate going on a suicide mission (Made the decision, and had enough time and experience to think about it).

b)
Consequences known to Fry: Unkown.
Consequences known to Leela: Known, and also shown and proofed by example (dead crew)

c)
Lives risked by Fry in the beginning: His own.
Lives risked by Leela in the beginning: Her own, Fry, Bender.

d)
Damage done by Fry: Leela was endangered, but got away unhurt.
Damage done by Leela: Killing Fry, which turned out into a "mere" nearly fatal wound through his torso.

e)
Punishment for Fry: Public proclamation he messed up and getting beaten up.
Punishment for Leela: ?

Now imagine you have only those text written above, and you are supposed to write a plot around these words. Who do you think did mess up more? And -if Leela is supposed to bear the same responsibilty for her actions as Fry- what kind of storywise punishment seems to be in order? It does not seem fair to let her get away more lenient than Fry.
spira

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #729 on: 11-24-2011 19:50 »
« Last Edit on: 11-24-2011 19:53 »

I go deep. That's how I roll. smile

Fry's mistake: Carelessness (drinking the bottle because of being thirsty, not to disobey an order. Not too much time to think about it).
Leela's mistake: Deliberate going on a suicide mission (Made the decision, and had enough time and experience to think about it).

He did disobey an order, though. Also, this isn't even the first time in this episode he put himself into mortal danger (requiring Leela to save him) - the gills?

Also, to be fair to Leela, her plan would have worked and they could have completed the mission. Bender's the one who screwed it up. She did have enough time to think about it, but she also had enough experience to come up with a plan that would have worked if the crew had cooperated. (Oh, wait, the same could be said for My Three Suns...)

Consequences known to Fry: Unkown.
Consequences known to Leela: Known, and also shown and proofed by example (dead crew)

This is pretty valid. I could say again that Leela was prepared adequately, but it's also true that she's stubborn as hell (not turning back after finding the black box) and that is a flaw of hers, just like Fry's carelessness is a flaw of his.

Lives risked by Fry in the beginning: His own.
Lives risked by Leela in the beginning: Her own, Fry, Bender.

True. But Leela was able to save herself, Fry, and Bender (despite it initially appearing that Fry died). Fry was completely reliant on Leela and the rest of the crew. In the end, Fry's mistake involved more people than Leela's did.

Damage done by Fry: Leela was endangered, but got away unhurt.
Damage done by Leela: Killing Fry, which turned out into a "mere" nearly fatal wound through his torso.

No, this is unfair. I could pose the first as "Killing Leela, which turned out to be a lie based on a plausible outcome as she was completely outnumbered," or the second as "Fry was endangered, but got away unhurt," since he ended up good as new with no consequences arising from his injury.

Punishment for Fry: Public proclamation he messed up and getting beaten up.
Punishment for Leela: ?

Firstly, his "getting beat up" was not his punishment for causing a problem, but the means by which the crew solved his problem. He brought that completely onto himself.

Punishment for Leela: um, she was in a coma in the hospital for two weeks. Amy even said the doctors thought she would never wake up. Thus, she nearly actually died because of her mistake. That's pretty drastic. Also, she was mentally tortured by hallucinations resulting from her extreme guilt. That seems much harsher than Fry making a "proclamation he messed up", which wasn't public but just to his friends.
UnrealLegend

Space Pope
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« Reply #730 on: 11-25-2011 05:04 »

Wow, so many massive posts. I like this forum. *claps*
Inquisitor Hein
Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #731 on: 11-27-2011 20:41 »
« Last Edit on: 11-27-2011 22:00 »

Quote
Also, to be fair to Leela, her plan would have worked and they could have completed the mission. Bender's the one who screwed it up. She did have enough time to think about it, but she also had enough experience to come up with a plan that would have worked if the crew had cooperated.

This will probably be my last post regarding that matter, otherwise, page-long posts by me might follow:) )

Okay...I'm gonna be fair on Leela smile

The captain's command authority is based on responsibility.  So, was that responsibility written on Leela?

- It was Leela's job to assess the mission (and she made no profit/risk assessment, but based her decision on self-centred emotions alone: "I do not wish to feel disappointed". How a captain FEELS about a mission is the most irrelevant parameter).
- The real course of the mission has to be compared to the actual events (They showed that the whole thing gets closer and closer. Which was ignored. No necessary plan/is comparison was performed).
- And -after seeing several times how dangerous those bees were- a responsible person would NEVER have taken one of them with her (no matter how cute it might have looked).

There were enough mistakes on Leela's part, and for a leader (which Leela was supposed to represent), there is NOT the excuse "But the other ones did also..." This might be an excuse for a crewmember, but for the captain rank, there is a price to pay.
Higher responsibility, graver consequences.

It was Leela's job to assess the mission, and to judge wether everyone was fit for that. For a leader/captain, there may not be a "Bender screwed up", there is only a "I failed to assess Bender's role and behaviour  in the mission accordingly, that's why we failed".
spira

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #732 on: 11-27-2011 22:02 »

Higher responsibility, graver consequences.

Fair enough. As a result of her errors, Leela almost died. Of the three, she was certainly the most physically harmed. This is a pretty grave consequence.
Otis P Jivefunk

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #733 on: 11-27-2011 22:06 »

Wow, so many massive posts. I like this forum. *claps*

No applause. Every time you clap your hands you kill thousands of spores that'll some day form a nutritious fungus...
Solid Gold Bender

Urban Legend
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« Reply #734 on: 12-10-2011 17:42 »

I think the worst character is The Headless Body of Agnu, he never made me laugh.
Otis P Jivefunk

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #735 on: 12-10-2011 17:50 »
« Last Edit on: 12-10-2011 19:46 »

I second that, I hate The Headless Body of Agnew too. I was quite surprised how popular he was in Fall Madness 2011, not funny at all...

edit - corrected...
Solid Gold Bender

Urban Legend
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« Reply #736 on: 12-10-2011 17:54 »

I don't know why some people hate Hermes, he has good weed jokes, I love his "My Manwich!" catchphrase, and his pointless cycle of Bureaucracy.
totalnerd undercanada

DOOP Ubersecretary
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« Reply #737 on: 12-10-2011 17:57 »
« Last Edit on: 12-10-2011 17:59 by totalnerduk »

The headless body of Agnew (Spiro Agnew, look him up) was pretty damn funny, IMO. It was almost as though he was Nixon's pet, this growling shambling man with no head. Following Nixon around and intimidating people. It was actually a decent gag, and they didn't overuse him.

Perhaps your appreciation of him as a character will improve when you look him up and realise who he was to Nixon and what their relationship was.

On another note, an anagram of "Spiro Agnew" is "Grow a penis."

As for Hermes... the pot jokes are best when they are understated and subtle. They've become more overt and thus, less amusing.

The cycle of bureaucracy though, that's somewhat underused really. I want to see all his pointless gewgaws and gadgets again, like the machine that recycles pointless forms into yet more pointless forms to be filled out again the next day, then recycled again.
Solid Gold Bender

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #738 on: 12-10-2011 18:07 »

I really couldn't stop laughing in: How Hermes Requisitioned His Groove Back in the very beginning when he finished stamping the papers, shredded them, and then printed them into blank papers.  laff
Otis P Jivefunk

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #739 on: 12-10-2011 19:47 »

I'm still not sold on The Headless Body of Agnew, I guess it's just not my type of humour, plus I can't think of a single decent quote from the guy...
Solid Gold Bender

Urban Legend
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« Reply #740 on: 12-10-2011 19:59 »
« Last Edit on: 12-10-2011 20:00 »

Probably because he can' talk, but can somehow understand things, how does that work?!  confused
animegeekmom

Delivery Boy
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« Reply #741 on: 12-15-2011 23:43 »

Agnew has long perplexed me.
Solid Gold Bender

Urban Legend
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« Reply #742 on: 12-16-2011 02:52 »

Agreed, but it is the future, and if they can increase the speed of light, then they can certainly make this somehow working man communicate.
animegeekmom

Delivery Boy
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« Reply #743 on: 12-16-2011 04:18 »

Very true.
coffeeBot

Urban Legend
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« Reply #744 on: 12-16-2011 05:52 »

I agree with tnuk about the headless body of Agnew. In historical context, it's hilarious. Also, I enjoy him as an odd reference to Frankenstein's monster.
Solid Gold Bender

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #745 on: 12-16-2011 13:23 »

I really just never got a laugh out of him, but we all have our opinions. After all, the show is stuffed with Easter Eggs.
Bender.B.Bendin

Crustacean
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« Reply #746 on: 12-27-2011 06:26 »

Oh Definitely bender. jk lol id have to say like out of the characters who work at the company Amy, but for the (any character) id vote Zap.
Bender.B.Bendin

Crustacean
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« Reply #747 on: 12-27-2011 06:29 »

Agnew isnt ment to be a popular character but everytime he's on an episode he does something funny. With Into the wild green yonder him chasing the feminist was quite a chuckle.
Solid Gold Bender

Urban Legend
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« Reply #748 on: 01-03-2012 22:04 »

Oh Definitely bender. jk lol id have to say like out of the characters who work at the company Amy, but for the (any character) id vote Zap.
Zap is one of the funniest characters on the show, and has some of the best lines!
Otis P Jivefunk

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« Reply #749 on: 01-03-2012 22:08 »

Zapp is definitely not the worst character on the show. If you seriously think that he is, then I guess Futurama's humour just isn't for you...
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« Reply #750 on: 01-03-2012 22:33 »

Those who don't understand Futurama humor are missing out on a lot.
DannyJC13

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« Reply #751 on: 01-03-2012 22:36 »

Or they're just retarded.
Solid Gold Bender

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« Reply #752 on: 01-03-2012 22:39 »

Some of the humor can be quite subtle, so a lot of people )retards) don't get those either.
UnrealLegend

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« Reply #753 on: 01-04-2012 03:38 »

I'm not really a fan of Randy. The only real "joke" about him is that... he's gay. And that "joke" is getting real old, real fast.

But I did like the way he was used in Overclockwise.
Solid Gold Bender

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« Reply #754 on: 01-04-2012 03:39 »

He's just more of a background character. Just appears here and there. I never really saw a joke coming from him, so he must just be a background character.
UnrealLegend

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« Reply #755 on: 01-04-2012 03:44 »

"Our poodle has two daddies"
"There are parts of the Bible I like and parts I don't like"
He does have (bad) jokes. I agree though, he works better as a background character.
I wonder why John DiMaggio likes him so much...
Solid Gold Bender

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« Reply #756 on: 01-04-2012 03:51 »

He just appeals to me more as a background character, than a failed jokester. I don't think he's supposed to be that funny, except those lines.
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« Reply #757 on: 01-04-2012 04:59 »

John probably just likes to jump on the chance to use that gay man voice because while I think Randy isn't the funniest of characters, I sort of chuckle at DiMaggio's overplaying of the stereotypical gay man's voice, so he probably thinks it's sorta funny as well. I certainly know not all gay males speak that way, but many do for reasons I don't comprehend. I find the lispy, sassy accent kinda funny regardless of who uses it. It's just so...invented for so many people I think that it's ridiculous and unnatural.

As for personally hated characters I cannot at the time point out a single one that I loathe with every fiber of my being.
TheMadCapper

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« Reply #758 on: 01-20-2012 18:24 »
« Last Edit on: 01-20-2012 18:26 »

Oh Definitely bender. jk lol id have to say like out of the characters who work at the company Amy, but for the (any character) id vote Zap.

Zapp is obnoxious and a buffoon. But he's not a bad character. Bad characters are unentertaining. When Zapp gets on-screen there are always laughs to be had.

Edit - you know who doesn't do it for me? Sal. He's low class and he adds an "S" to the end of many of his words. That's it.
Solid Gold Bender

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« Reply #759 on: 01-20-2012 21:26 »

Sal is funny, IMO. His best role was also probably in the opening scene of Parasites. Him adding S's to the end of words always seemed humorous to me, but I guess everyone has their own opinion...
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