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Author Topic: Futurama Math  (Read 9851 times)
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Squeakypants

Crustacean
*
« on: 07-16-2004 16:23 »
« Last Edit on: 07-16-2004 16:23 »

I'm sure this might have been posted before, but there is a lot of math in Futurama. I found this site about it:  http://www.mathsci.appstate.edu/~sjg/simpsonsmath/futuramamath/

Last night, I noticed that Bender's apt. was #00100100. Out of curiousity, I converted it from binary to ascii, and the result was . Not sure if it was a coincedence or not, but its cool!
germanfryfan

The Listmaker
Urban Legend
***
« Reply #1 on: 07-16-2004 16:35 »
« Last Edit on: 07-16-2004 16:35 »

Welcome to Peel Squeakypants    smile

With a huge possibility was it posted before, there was even a news article on CGEF ( http://www.gotfuturama.com  ) about it. (just found it again, it was on 25th of April)

And about the ASCII code. You can be sure that it wasn't a coincidence, there writers put more of these into the series (like the number in the mirror of "the honking" ).

Enjoy it here, it's where the nerds stay.    wink
futuramafreak

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #2 on: 07-16-2004 16:40 »

On that note, what do the numbers in the mirror say?
germanfryfan

The Listmaker
Urban Legend
***
« Reply #3 on: 07-16-2004 16:41 »

It was also said on the comentaries
ooy

Professor
*
« Reply #4 on: 07-16-2004 18:15 »

01100010011010010110111001100 00101110010011110010010000001 10100101110011001000000110001 10110110001101111011011110110 1100
Sal

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #5 on: 07-16-2004 18:21 »

01101111011011110111100100100 00001101001011100110010000001 10000100100000011011100110010 1011100100110010000100001

 tongue
DDie

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #6 on: 07-16-2004 18:23 »

01001111011010000010000001111 00101100101011000010110100000 11111100100000010110010110111 10111010100100000011100110111 01000110100101101110011010110 01011000010000001000010011001 010110 11100110010001100101011100100 01001110111001100100000011001 11011100100110010101100001011 10100001000010010000001000100 01100101011000010110110000100 00001110111011010010111010001 101000 00100000011010010111010000100 001
Squeakypants

Crustacean
*
« Reply #7 on: 07-16-2004 18:59 »
« Last Edit on: 07-16-2004 18:59 »

double post
Squeakypants

Crustacean
*
« Reply #8 on: 07-16-2004 19:00 »

Thanks for the welcome!

Check out my sig (down)


0100001001001001010101000100
0101001000000100110101011001
0010000001010011010010000100
1001010011100101100100100000
0100110101000101010101000100
0001010011000010000001000001
0101001101010011
Kyle_M
Starship Captain
****
« Reply #9 on: 07-16-2004 19:08 »

Funny, but I think you should put it on two (or more) spaces so people won't have to scroll over whenever you attach your sig.  smile
Sal

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #10 on: 07-16-2004 19:17 »

are there other types of binary?
Gwan101

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #11 on: 07-16-2004 19:19 »

01010111011010000110000101110 10000100000011010010110011000 10000001100101011011100111010 00110100101110010011001010010 00000100011001110101011101000 11101010111001001100001011011 010110 00010010000001100101011100000 11010010111001101101111011001 00011001010111001100100000011 10111011001010111001001100101 00100000011010010110111000100 00001100010011010010110111001 100001 01110010011110010010111000101 11000101110001000000100111101 11001000100000011000100110010 10111010001110100011001010111 00100010000001111001011001010 11101000010110000100000011101 110110 10000110000101110100001000000 11010010110011000100000011101 00011010000110010100100000011 00010011010010110001001101100 01100101001000000111011101100 10101110010011001010010000001 101001 01101110001000000110001001101 00101101110011000010111001001 11100100100001001000000101100 10110010101110011001000010010 00000100111001101111011101110 01000000100100100100000011010 000110 00010111011001100101001000000 11000010010000001101101011010 01011100110111001101101001011 01111011011100010000100100000
Quolnok

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #12 on: 07-16-2004 20:59 »
« Last Edit on: 07-16-2004 20:59 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Sal:
are there other types of binary?

Other types? Not realy, unless you mean Octal and Hexadecimal.

EDIT: I was too lazy to decode that for myself so intead I found http://nickciske.com/tools/binary.php  on google.
germanfryfan

The Listmaker
Urban Legend
***
« Reply #13 on: 07-16-2004 21:12 »
« Last Edit on: 07-16-2004 21:12 »

You can convert a decimal value into every number-system you want.
Not only into the "normal" computer systems (binary, octal, hexal) but also into systems based on 3, 4, 5, 6, ... n.

(It all depends on how many symbols you have)

a 1234dec in the 3rd System is 1200201 for example.

Here a German site that can calculate into every number-system (easy understandable as non German)
Jicannon

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #14 on: 07-17-2004 00:05 »

yep...nerds we are gff ....nerds we are.... wink
Guineapig Trick

Professor
*
« Reply #15 on: 07-17-2004 01:24 »

Today I was at this children's mueseum and there was a machine that you can spell things in bianary and then it says it, I got it to say 'Fuck' like 6 times, but no one noticed so my useless talent was wasted.
M0le

Space Pope
****
« Reply #16 on: 07-17-2004 02:22 »

I... see... I can't believe no agents didn't pick you up right then and there and get you your own talk show. The nerve of some people. Any other talents we haven't heard about of yours GT?
canned eggs

Space Pope
****
« Reply #17 on: 07-17-2004 04:15 »

There are math jokes in Futurama?  Get right out of town! 

Hey, squeakypants, edit your sig.  It's too damn long. 
Prof. Wernstrum

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #18 on: 07-18-2004 09:37 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Sal:
are there other types of binary?

It depends what you mean by that. It is possible to form a numeric system to any base > 1 ("Base" essentially means the number of different digits) some of these are commonly used e.g. base 2 = binary, base 8 = octal, base 16 = hexadecimal and of course base 10 = denary, popular amongst inferior fleshy meatbags since it lets them count on their fingers.

If you're talking about the standard code of 0's and 1's however, there aren't really different types of binary as such but rather different interpretations of what the numbers mean. The ones used as jokes on Futurama (Basically because there's some chance of a sufficiently nerdy person solving them, most binary codes are specific to a particular machine/ program) are binary representation of numbers (I won't go into this in full detail but essentially each bit represents a different power of two) and ASCII codes where each 8-bit code represents a different symbol.

F is the 6th letter of the alphabet.
O is the 15th letter (1+5=6)
X is the 24th letter (2+4=6)

Hence, FOX = 666
Quolnok

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #19 on: 07-19-2004 00:07 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Prof. Wernstrum:
 ...It is possible to form a numeric system to any base > 1 ("Base" essentially means the number of different digits) some of these are commonly used e.g. base 2 = binary, base 8 = octal, base 16 = hexadecimal and of course base 10 = denary...

actually any base > 0, and its decimal not denary.
eg. 15(dec) = F(hex)
    0,1,2(dec) = 0,00,000(base 1)
Shaucker

Professor
*
« Reply #20 on: 07-19-2004 08:19 »

......nerds....

I only know Basic and Pascal  big grin
Squeakypants

Crustacean
*
« Reply #21 on: 07-20-2004 13:09 »

I know visual basic!

With all this nerd talk its kind of odd that I just watched revenge of the nerds ii.

 
Quote
You were like the George Washington of Nerds back in high school. Now you're the nerd Benedict Arnold.
mic

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #22 on: 07-20-2004 16:14 »
« Last Edit on: 04-25-2010 17:16 by [-mArc-] »

Squeakypants, you may want to read the credits on the article.  It was infact written by mArc, and his name links to CGEF     tongue  It was also on Slashdot a while ago, which really killed the server.  Disappointing for a university server.

Gwen, that was needlessly long     tongue  And your encoding is buggy, so I lost some characters in decoding it.

As for the binary stuff, I do nerdy things, like when I write a one-liner in PHP to decode binary.  Never mind searching for a pre-done method, doing it yourself is more 'satisfying'.  It's not terribly hard to do, just set $d as the binary text (in a string) and do:

Code:
for($i=0;$i<=strlen($d);$i++){if($j==8)
{$j=0;echo(chr($k));$k=0;}$k=$k*2;
if($d{$i}=="0"&#0124; &#0124;$d{$i}=="1" ){if($d{$i})$k++;
$j++;}}

That includes some error checking.  Spaces inserted so UBB doesn't chew up my code, which is important  smile  You could get away with not resetting k each time, as chr() seems to ignore higher bits, however after ten characters the variable overflows.  So that's no good.  Or in Python (setting the binary data in the variable 'd' as a string):

Code:
i=j=k=0;o=''
while(i<len(d)):
 if(j==8): o=o+chr(k);j=k=0
 k=k*2
 if(d[i]=='0'):j=j+1
 if(d[i]=='1'):k=k+1;j=j+1
 i=i+1
print o

Meh, it's offtopic, but I have this habit of writing pointless code     tongue  Due to the fact that Python demands clean code, it's hard to make it a one-liner.  Though I've reduced it as much as I can.  The only difference, really, between the php and python code is the way the loop is setup, and that php decodes on the fly.  Python waits until it's done before printing out.

You could probably do it in Basic, though it's lack of good string handling would make it interesting.  That is, being able to easily manipulate them on the fly.

UmVhbCBnZWVrcyBkbyBpdCB1c2luZ yBiYXNlLTY0Lg==     big grin

Good luck decoding it (though it's a common algorithm), and the two equals signs at the end should give it away     tongue
Gwan101

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #23 on: 07-20-2004 21:20 »

Not my fault. :-P

I used the binary translator... then copied and pasted it.

Squeakypants

Crustacean
*
« Reply #24 on: 07-23-2004 08:44 »

I found it on slashdot.

Last night there was something I found, but I can't remember what it was. I think it had to do with Bender again.
Nibblonian

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #25 on: 07-29-2004 12:06 »

01001001001001110110110100100 00001101110011001010111011100 10000001110100011011110010000 00101000001000101010001010100 11000010110000100000011010000 11011110111011100100000011001 000110 11110110010101110011001000000 10000100110100101101110011000 01011100100111100100100000011 10111011011110111001001101011 00111111001000000100100100100 11101101101001000000110111101 101110 01101100011110010010000001110 11101110010011010010111010001 10100101101110011001110010000 00110100101101110001000000100 00100110100101101110011000010 11100100111100100100000011000 100110 01010110001101100001011101010 11100110110010100100000010010 01001000000111011101100101011 01110011101000010000001110100 01101111001000000110100001110 10001110100011100000011101000 101111 00101111011011100110100101100 01101101011011000110110100101 11001101101011011001010010111 00110001101101111011011010010 11110111010001101111011011110 11011000111001100101111011000 100110 10010110111001100001011100100 11110010010111001110000011010 0001110000
TheLampIncident

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #26 on: 07-29-2004 12:16 »

Hey you cunts, shut the fuck up with the binary already. It's not funny, it's just annoying.

Besides, it's been done before, and in good context.
germanfryfan

The Listmaker
Urban Legend
***
« Reply #27 on: 07-29-2004 12:35 »
« Last Edit on: 07-29-2004 12:35 »

Welcome to Peel Nibblonian,

How does Binary to ASCII work you ask.

First you need the ASCII chart.
There every character is ordered with a number from 0 to 255 (8-bit / 1 byte).
A bit is the smallest unit there is in a computer, it is expressed through the signs 0 and 1.
Simply spoken they represent wheter the is electricity or not. (Like a switch off/on).

To convert from binary into ASCII you need to devide your binary text into words of 8-bit each.
Then covert these 8-bit words into the decimal system.
This is done by looking where you have zeros and where you have ones.

Go from the right to the left through every 8-bit word.
Each bit stands for a power of 2, so is the most right 2^0 (1), the second from the right 2^1 (2),
the third 2^2 (4), the forth 2^3 (8), ... until the 8th (left) 2^7 (127).
Whenever there is a 1 you have to add the value coresponding to it.

Example:


01001001 =
0*2^7 + 1*2^6 + 0*2^5 + 0*2^4 + 1*2^3 + 0*2^2 + 0*2^1 + 1*2^0 =

0*128 + 1*64 + 0*32 + 0*16 + 1*8 + 0*4 + 0*2 + 1*1 =

64 + 8 + 1 = 73


Now you can look up each character in the ASCII chart.

Enjoy your stay here at nerd-world    wink

-------------
And I have to agree with Lamp, it really becomes annoying.

There are easier ways to calculate them and computers can do it much faster.
Archie2K

Space Pope
****
« Reply #28 on: 07-29-2004 15:00 »

For fun (seriously) in a lunch the other day I worked out how to decode various number systems. It's needlessly long and complicated as GFF said, but I discovered that the most evil number in existance is 2030. That's 666 in base 6. dun dun dun!

And before anyone says what about 666 in base 666 (I'm staring at you drunk aslate!) that's just 10.

At the same time experessing a Googleplex is easy in base Googleplex - it's 10.
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