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Author Topic: Jurassic Bark: Seymour was a dumb dog  (Read 31560 times)
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Frisco17

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« Reply #320 on: 03-06-2009 00:13 »

The Professor's actaully got two sons.
suss6052

Starship Captain
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« Reply #321 on: 03-06-2009 03:24 »

The Professor's actaully got two sons.

Technically that is incorrect, he had one son with mom (Igner), but Cubert isn't his son  because he was cloned from one of the shapelier growths on the Professor's back making him a clone of the professor and having an identical DNA makeup if not personality, there was no new mother as a genetic donor for the material that created Cubert.

BBS didn't ruin Jurassic Bark because the end montage in Jurassic bark with the dog laying down to die waiting for Fry wasn't how he had died in the first place, the positioning of the legs of the fossil were bolt upright not all flat and against the ground, BBS just makes it clearer the events that lead to him becoming fossilized. Fry chose not to bring Seymour back to life on the thought that since he had lived a full life he would have moved on after Fry had left, therefore one of the most unselfish things Fry had ever done appeared to be also a wrong decision at the time, but it really wasn't.
MaNBoT

Bending Unit
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« Reply #322 on: 03-06-2009 19:50 »

Also do we all remember how the proffessor said seymore was "fast fossilised" in jurrasic bark? Well we find out in BBS he was fast fossilised because of what happened with bender. Which is also why he was standing up as a fossile and not lying down like the end of jurrassic bark depicted.
zoiby

Starship Captain
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« Reply #323 on: 03-07-2009 07:18 »

According to BBS Seymour didn't wait at all for Fry because Fry never left  except when he went whale hunting
Gorky

Space Pope
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« Reply #324 on: 03-07-2009 14:57 »

Eh, I don't think BBS necessarily ruins the emotional impact of JB. Seymour still spent two years waiting for Fry, and I'd wager that he was somewhat neglected (emotionally) when Fry went so gaga over Leelu. Plus, Fry was very upset about having left Leela in the future, about losing to Lars, so it's not like he was the most attentive owner. Yeah, BBS shows us a scene of the two of them having fun, but I think that's the exception, not the rule. And besides, I think the ending of JB is so touching because of Seymour's loyalty to Fry (a loyalty that probably didn't wane, regardless of Fry's daily presence), not because he died waiting for his owner to come back. I mean, the two concepts are related, but I think the ultimate theme of JB is loyalty, not, um, death-by-neglect.

If anything, I think BBS provides JB with a better sense of logic, specifically regarding the fast-fossilization. If BBS ruins the emotional impact of any episode, it's "The Luck of the Fryrish", but that's another topic for another thread.
songficcer

Bending Unit
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« Reply #325 on: 03-15-2009 09:09 »

The episode is meant to play on our emotions. Especially if you've ever had a dog that you consider more then just a pet. I get teary eyed watching it, and I've seen the episode multiple times.

Its just something more for pet owners and animal lovers who see their pets as human or with human personality. Kinna like me  roll eyes
voilet_star

Crustacean
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« Reply #326 on: 05-10-2009 18:32 »

ahh personally i was a blubbering mess at the end of the episode i think the saddest thing was that fry thought seymour didnt love him and had forgotten all about him, when that wasnt the case, and fry will never know that, all those years that seymour waited hoping for his master to return (fry was probably the only perosn to have shown him love in his little life) but he never will frown
cheeman

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« Reply #327 on: 05-12-2009 18:32 »

I agree it is quite sad but it was too old that if they made the clone it wouldn't remember fry
benderguitar

Poppler
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« Reply #328 on: 06-03-2009 07:33 »

this episode was so sad it made me cry
hobo bot

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« Reply #329 on: 06-13-2009 12:44 »

Its the music that does it at the end , that damn music always sets me off  frown! Just replace it with jump around by house of pain then all is well  wink
x.Bianca.x

Urban Legend
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« Reply #330 on: 06-13-2009 13:05 »

The music was very sad. I might watch it later but put the tv on mute and play a really crazy song on my ipod and see the different effect...
hobo bot

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« Reply #331 on: 06-13-2009 17:29 »

Let me know how if it helps Bianca  wink
hobbitboy

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« Reply #332 on: 06-14-2009 14:16 »


   The music was very sad. I might watch it later but put the tv on mute and play a really crazy song on my ipod and see the different effect...


Try it with marching band music. Perhaps something by John Philip Sousa?
x.Bianca.x

Urban Legend
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« Reply #333 on: 06-14-2009 14:19 »

I will try it tomorrow.

I might try just the one scene with various genres of music maybe.
Future Shock

Liquid Emperor
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« Reply #334 on: 06-14-2009 14:27 »

Try Yakety Sax!  tongue
x.Bianca.x

Urban Legend
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« Reply #335 on: 06-15-2009 12:33 »

Ok, so I tried about 12 different songs, plus the original last, here is what I found:

* The timing and lyrics in the song made the scene more effective, a song that seemed to be even a little in sync with the scene was more sad and if the lyrics were really sad or meaningful it added to the emotion of the scene.

* Songs with calmer vocals were more effective

* Usually slow songs were more effective

I'd say it's the timing and lyrics that really get to you, but the song they chose for that scene was definetely a perfect fit. There were maybe 1 or 2 songs I chose that would have had nearly the same effect as the original.
jilly

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« Reply #336 on: 07-21-2009 05:51 »

I have a five year old daughter named Molly who watches Futurama with me on DVD's and on Adult Swim at times, and she cried quite a bit at this episode.  I'll detail what I think caused the tears and made this episode so powerful.  It's really a rollercoaster of emotions that dumps you into a big off the tracks crash at the end!

When watching this episode, the first emotional strain for those of us who are sensitive was Fry finding out his dog was petrified.  Molly loves animals, and at first was upset that Fry’s dog was petrified, but then was happy with the “Good News” that the professor was going to be able to bring him back to life. 

Then Bender, in a fit of jealousy, throws Seymour into the hot lava, and Fry cries out because he's told his dog can't survive - this is the second emotional pull - Molly was upset and mad.  She was mad at Bender for being so jealous of Fry that he would throw his friend's old pet into hot lava, forever robbing Fry of the chance to have his dog back, just when Fry was happy and ready to have Seymour back.

Then when Bender does the right thing, and gets Seymour out of the hot lava and gives him back to Fry for recreation, Molly is happier, but still nervous, and then when Fry sees that Seymour lived 12 years without him (or however many years it was), and talks about how Seymour had a happy life without him, probably learned to bark-sing new songs, and decided not to bring him back, and just leave him as he was, that was upsetting again.. emotional pull number three.  A little tear started down Molly’s cheek.  But she thought what Fry was thinking was understandable, because Fry thought Seymour had a happy life after he was gone, and so it was okay not to bring him back.. 

Then, as it goes into the closing section, you see Seymour running around, looking for Fry everywhere, and Molly started to cry more – because she feels Seymour's panic and pain, looking for his lost best friend, Fry.  And she knows he's not going to find him because he's frozen.   And out of all of Fry's family, Seymour's the only one who really seems to care that he's gone.  His mom is watching sports, his dad really isn't worried, his brother is somewhat thinking about it.  To a five year old, your mom and dad not caring about you when you are in trouble is scary! emotional pull number four!

Then, when Seymour finds Fry at the cryogenic lab, and the staff calls his parents to come pick the dog up, and they come to pick up Seymour at the cryogenic lab, and he's  barking at Fry in the cylinder, and the parents don’t see him, Molly started to sob, saying “He’s right there – he’s right there!  Why can’t his mommy and daddy see him??” and she sobbed even harder as they drag Seymour out the door, away from Fry.  This is heart-tugging too, because even though Fry enjoys his life in the future, the thought that you would be in trouble, and your own mom and dad would walk right by you and not notice you frozen in a tube is upsetting.  Seymour had found Fry, and knew where he was.  emotional pull number five!

Then, as that slow song starts that goes “I will wait for you”, and it shows Seymour waiting for Fry over and over, as the seasons change, as people come and go, until Seymour finally settles down in the position they find him petrified in, she completely broke down, and said “He wasn’t happy, he didn’t have a happy life, he could never find Fry, and he waited for him forever and Fry never came back and he died!”  emotional roller coaster goes off the tracks at this pont, and crashes into the concrete.

At this point, I am now crying too, putting my arms around her, trying to think what to say.. Because she was right, Seymour didn’t have a happy life without Fry.  At this point my husband comes in, sees us both sobbing on the couch, and looks at the TV, and says “What?? It’s just a cartoon!!” and Molly sobbed back at him “Daddy,  just because they are drawn doesn’t mean they’re not real!” 

And that's the truth.  Fry and all his emotions and his life is real to us, even if he is only 'animated'  and boy, that episode had such a powerful emotional effect on us.  We avoid it on purpose now, along with Luck of the Fryish, for some of the same reasons, allthough Jurassic Bark was by far the more powerful.
hobbitboy

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« Reply #337 on: 07-21-2009 15:02 »

I must admit that I hardly ever watch Jurassic Bark because of the way it makes me feel at the end but (oddly enough) that is the same reason why I watch Luck of the Fryish more often than any other episode (except, perhaps, The Sting)!

Don't hate me, Trinity.  I'm just the messenger.
jilly

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« Reply #338 on: 07-21-2009 15:10 »

I must admit that I hardly ever watch Jurassic Bark because of the way it makes me feel at the end but (oddly enough) that is the same reason why I watch Luck of the Fryish more often than any other episode (except, perhaps, The Sting)!
See, that's because luck of the Fryish has an uplifting ending - Fry realized his brother loved him, and honored him at the end, when he realized it was his nephew who did all those things, and that his brother thought about him every day, enough to name his child after him andgive him the lucky clover, etc.

In Jurassic Bark, the ending is tragic, because Fry decides not to get Seymour back, based on what is shown to us to be a false impression that Seymour was happy and had a good rest of his life without him..  So we are left feelnig sad and frustrated, wanting to hop into the TV and tell Fry "No, get him back!  He did not have a good time without you and deserves some love and fun now!"
Officer 1BDI

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« Reply #339 on: 07-21-2009 18:58 »

At this point my husband comes in, sees us both sobbing on the couch, and looks at the TV, and says “What?? It’s just a cartoon!!” and Molly sobbed back at him “Daddy,  just because they are drawn doesn’t mean they’re not real!”

That's brilliant.

I must admit that I hardly ever watch Jurassic Bark because of the way it makes me feel at the end but (oddly enough) that is the same reason why I watch Luck of the Fryish more often than any other episode (except, perhaps, The Sting)!

It's the exact opposite for me.  For some reason I'm not as affected by JB like 99% of the fandom seems to be, but Fryrish... I can only watch that episode once a year, tops.
Go-a-Green-a

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« Reply #340 on: 07-23-2009 07:04 »

That was such a moving episode. I never thought an animated TV show could make me so sad, of course I thought that before I knew about the world's greatest Si-Fi cartoon, Futurama. I liked that episode, but my favourite is and always will be (at least untill we get some new episodes!) my absolute fave. 

Seymour was an incredibly loyal dog. Loyalty is not stupidity. He was only obaying Fry. He told Seymour to wait so he waited.
Go-a-Green-a

Bending Unit
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« Reply #341 on: 07-23-2009 07:05 »

Oops, sorry for the double post but I meant to say that my favourite episode is The Sting and always will be....
hobbitboy

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« Reply #342 on: 07-23-2009 17:43 »

If you notice a mistake or omission in your post and you're wanting to rectify it without double posting, you can always use the 'edit' button (up at the top right of your posts, beside the 'quote' button) to make changes to the original message.

Don't hate me, Trinity.  I'm just the messenger.
Go-a-Green-a

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« Reply #343 on: 07-23-2009 23:55 »

If you notice a mistake or omission in your post and you're wanting to rectify it without double posting, you can always use the 'edit' button (up at the top right of your posts, beside the 'quote' button) to make changes to the original message.

Thanks.
willsterdude3000

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« Reply #344 on: 08-16-2009 19:53 »
« Last Edit on: 08-20-2010 11:27 »

This episode doesn't really make me sad.
Go-a-Green-a

Bending Unit
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« Reply #345 on: 08-16-2009 22:54 »

Just watched it again last night. It still makes me sad! Seymour was not a dumb dog, he was in fact very smart. Fry told him to wait and that's what he did, he obayed his master. How many dogs out there would wait 12 years for their master's return if he/she left? Not many, and if my dog (when I get him that is) just sat and waited for my return when I leave to go out somewhere Seymour would pop into my mind.
leela09

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« Reply #346 on: 08-17-2009 02:32 »

Of course there is a real life example of Seymour.It comes from Edinburgh Scotland and called Greyfriars Bobby.
Disney actually made a movie about it back in the 60's.
You can read about it on Wikipedia.
No-one who knows the story of this loyal dog would ever call him dumb.
Human character attributes like smart or dumb should never be attributed to any species but humans.
This is called anthromophising.
Go-a-Green-a

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« Reply #347 on: 08-17-2009 04:23 »

Of course there is a real life example of Seymour.It comes from Edinburgh Scotland and called Greyfriars Bobby.
Disney actually made a movie about it back in the 60's.
You can read about it on Wikipedia.
No-one who knows the story of this loyal dog would ever call him dumb.
Human character attributes like smart or dumb should never be attributed to any species but humans.
This is called anthromophising.

I know that story, it must have slipped my mind. Your right about that. No way was that dog dumb. And yes, dumb is a human term and should only apply to humans. Seymour was loyal and by no means should he be called dumb. He's a dog, we can't use a human term to describe a dog if it's about intelligence.
hobbitboy

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« Reply #348 on: 08-17-2009 15:03 »


   Of course there is a real life example of Seymour.It comes from Edinburgh Scotland and called Greyfriars Bobby.


There's also this example from Japan.

Don't hate me, Trinity.  I'm just the messenger.
Nixons Head

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« Reply #349 on: 08-17-2009 15:36 »

I'm not a animal lover (in fact i dislike them) but the end of this episode was so sad, i was practically in tears.
rancor
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« Reply #350 on: 08-20-2010 00:47 »
« Last Edit on: 08-20-2010 00:49 »

OP, you're an idiot. You're putting down the fact that Seymour waited for him throughout the years because it's unrealistic? Do you realize that you're watching a cartoon about a guy being frozen than unfrozen a thousand years later where he falls in love with a one-eyed women and where a lobster looking creature like Zoidberg is a human doctor? Among other things?
It's a little something called fiction? You might not have realized it, but Futurama is based on it.
MovieMurderer

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« Reply #351 on: 08-20-2010 03:48 »

OP, you're an idiot. You're putting down the fact that Seymour waited for him throughout the years because it's unrealistic? Do you realize that you're watching a cartoon about a guy being frozen than unfrozen a thousand years later where he falls in love with a one-eyed women and where a lobster looking creature like Zoidberg is a human doctor? Among other things?
It's a little something called fiction? You might not have realized it, but Futurama is based on it.

And don't forget that the story of Seymour was based on many real stories (the waiting until death part, that is), all tragic.
bearboots

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« Reply #352 on: 08-25-2010 19:59 »

When Jurassic Bark aired in South Africa it must have been about 2006 so i was 14 years old and yoh this episode made me cry like the little girl i was :< For me I never thought about how unrealistic it is for a dog to wait that long for anyone but that really isn't the point. It was such a moving episode, just so poignant and memorable.

As I've grown older and watched Futurama more I've come to appreciate that episode a lot more because it makes me think that Seymour must have been one of the few living things that missed Fry when he was frozen. In the episode where Michelle gets unfrozen she spoke about how nobody really missed him when he was gone and how his parents didn't want to conduct a search. I know that Yancy named his son after Fry but I just found it really touching that Seymour waited for him. I'm sure that many people at some point in their life have wondered if anyone would care or notice if they disappeared so it was nice to see that Fry's disappearance did matter to someone and that emotion was portrayed in a very touching way.
FemJesse

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« Reply #353 on: 09-08-2010 17:24 »
« Last Edit on: 09-08-2010 17:25 »

xkcd once said that Security questions tried to ask whether or not the user cried at the end of this episode, but it turns out even auto-spammers cry at the end of this episode.

There are multiple kinds of love and Seymour demonstrated eternal love for his master, the kind that most pet owners wish their pets share with them. Its almost a dependency; a need that he was denied. His love went unresolved.

For people that aren't directly affected by this emotional concept, they may have had pets they start injecting their pet into Seymour's position and themselves into Fry's and it brings up memories and the desire to see your friend again.

I'm in agreeance that if you either are too intellectually dumb to understand the intention or too emotionally dumb to sympathize, you're either a robot or a vegetable... either way soulless.

People aren't meant to outlive their pets.
Tachyon

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« Reply #354 on: 05-03-2015 00:27 »


At long last, Hachiko is reunited with his human smile

Beamer

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« Reply #355 on: 05-05-2015 06:47 »

It's also worth mentioning that Seymour isn't even wearing his wedding ring in Bender's Big Score.
winna

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« Reply #356 on: 06-23-2015 13:12 »

xkcd once said that Security questions tried to ask whether or not the user cried at the end of this episode, but it turns out even auto-spammers cry at the end of this episode.

There are multiple kinds of love and Seymour demonstrated eternal love for his master, the kind that most pet owners wish their pets share with them. Its almost a dependency; a need that he was denied. His love went unresolved.

For people that aren't directly affected by this emotional concept, they may have had pets they start injecting their pet into Seymour's position and themselves into Fry's and it brings up memories and the desire to see your friend again.

I'm in agreeance that if you either are too intellectually dumb to understand the intention or too emotionally dumb to sympathize, you're either a robot or a vegetable... either way soulless.

People aren't meant to outlive their pets.


I don't think I'm either intellectually or emotionally held back (dumb in this case), and I can both subjectively and objectively view that scene in a large myriad of ways.  It's a cartoon.  It's a representation of a dog and a human.  It's a representation of loyalty from a dog to his human.  I know dogs, I know cartoons.  Humans are animals who wear food and fight with one another.  Sometimes Humans trick other Animals into helping them get some more food to wear.  Both Dogs and animals live in a reality where they compete to collect and consolidate the most food to wear.  I like animals.  Love is an alien concept to most.  I also don't think anything ever ends.  It all just has its place and its time, and in those times and those places it exists, and sometimes that's good.  No reason to be sad.  One day Seymour sang sunshine, another day he didn't.... but... on one of those days he did.  Also, I romanticize sadness and loneliness.  Kind of sick of me I suppose.  I like lonely people... I like being alone.  I like communion too.  :sigh:
Tachyon

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« Reply #357 on: 10-12-2016 22:52 »


People aren't meant to outlive their pets.


I take "meant" in that context to imply a relationship designed and/or controlled by some external entity.  Considering whether people should outlive their pets, what are reasonable alternatives?  That we should end our lives when a cherished pet dies or is lost and does not return?  Or perhaps we should engineer species commonly adopted as pets to increase their typical longevity to match that of a human lifespan?

Looking at the opposite side of the relationship, should pets outlive their adopters?  I was very surprised to learn that people often stipulate in wills that their pets be euthanized, often for the purpose of having their pets buried with them.  In cases where the pets are infirm or of very advanced age, I would have a difficult time arguing against the practice despite the revulsion I feel.  This resurfaces a couple of incidents which touched me personally, one which left me with unassuagable feelings of guilt and grief.


Love is an alien concept to most.


Perhaps you might agree if that were rephrased as "Love is an indefinable concept to most"?

To me, love is a state of mind comprised of several related feelings -- a state which acts as a filter which colours both external and internally-generated data before it passes through or bubbles up to our innermost selves.

winna

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« Reply #358 on: 10-18-2016 05:17 »

Sure.
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