Futurama   Planet Express Employee Lounge
The Futurama Message Board

Design and Support by Can't get enough Futurama
Help Search Futurama chat Login Register

PEEL - The Futurama Message Board    Re-Check/Weird Scenes    In space, no-one can see you suffocate. « previous next »
Author Topic: In space, no-one can see you suffocate.  (Read 1183 times)
Pages: 1 [2] Print
victor2000
Starship Captain
****
« Reply #40 on: 03-04-2004 11:28 »
« Last Edit on: 03-04-2004 11:28 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Unknown:
And why exactly is Neptune solid?
Thats a very good question.  Even over thousands of year, Neptune has deadly gases.  How would it be made livable?   hmpf   confused

TOTHPD!!!  big grin
------------------
A Proud Crustacean.
newhook_1

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #41 on: 03-04-2004 12:56 »

"The first two thirds of Neptune is composed of a mixture of molten rock, water, liquid ammonia and methane. The outer third is a mixture of heated gases comprised of hydrogen, helium, water and methane. Methane gives Neptune its blue cloud color."
I don't know alot about Science, but isn't it probable for solid rock to exist if Molten rock exists?
Coilette

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #42 on: 03-04-2004 15:20 »

It also means that Alligators/Crocodiles are also able to survive on the moon, rather than just the sewers.
victor2000
Starship Captain
****
« Reply #43 on: 03-04-2004 16:01 »
« Last Edit on: 03-04-2004 16:01 »

   
Quote
Originally posted by newhook_1:
"The first two thirds of Neptune is composed of a mixture of molten rock, water, liquid ammonia and methane. The outer third is a mixture of heated gases comprised of hydrogen, helium, water and methane. Methane gives Neptune its blue cloud color."
I don't know alot about Science, but isn't it probable for solid rock to exist if Molten rock exists?
I don't know too much about science either, but I'm pretty sure methane is not good for humans.  laff  tongue
VoVat

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #44 on: 03-04-2004 17:52 »

 
Quote
Maybe it was the fact that it was the moon. I mean...c mon..ya cant mess with the moon

During the terraforming craze of the 27th-29th centuries, Al Gore fought to preserve the Moon's current state.  He IS Emperor of the Moon, after all. <g>
hobojobo

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #45 on: 03-04-2004 19:10 »

I'm pretty sure that in a vacuum, other stuff happens to you besides suffocation (You freeze instantly). How could the farmer on the moon stay alive when he took off his helmet?
newhook_1

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #46 on: 03-04-2004 21:48 »
« Last Edit on: 03-04-2004 21:48 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by victor2000:
 
I don't know too much about science either, but I'm pretty sure methane is not good for humans.    laff    tongue


I know that, the question was if solid ground could exist.
victor2000
Starship Captain
****
« Reply #47 on: 03-04-2004 22:45 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by newhook_1:
 
I know that, the question was if solid ground could exist.
I agree. After reading your previous post, you do have a point.  If molten rock exists on Neptune, then solid rock might exist.  My understanding is that when solid rock melts, it becomes molten rock, so there must be heat on Neptunre.  That brings us back to the heat issue.  tongue   tongue   tongue
Unknown

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #48 on: 03-05-2004 00:41 »

As far as I know, the only solid ground on Neptune is the core.  At that depth, pressure is in the thousands, if not millions of atmospheres, and the temperature is comparable to that of the Sun's surface.  Anywhere with viable pressure and or temperature is in a gaseous part of the planet.
Hedonism Bot

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #49 on: 03-05-2004 08:42 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by hobojobo:
I'm pretty sure that in a vacuum, other stuff happens to you besides suffocation (You freeze instantly). How could the farmer on the moon stay alive when he took off his helmet?

There's a thin atmosphere of pollution from Lunar Park, which stops all of the vacuum-related effects happening but can't support life. I was under the impression that liquids boiled in a vacuum, because there was no pressure keeping the molecules together; however, I'm not sure.
David A

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #50 on: 03-05-2004 09:13 »

Liquids boil in a vacuum, due to the lack of pressure.  Then, the resulting gas sublimates directly to a solid state, due to the lack of heat.
victor2000
Starship Captain
****
« Reply #51 on: 03-05-2004 12:15 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by David A:
Liquids boil in a vacuum, due to the lack of pressure.  Then, the resulting gas sublimates directly to a solid state, due to the lack of heat.

That's a very interesting point, David, though it gets more confusing the more you think about it.... roll eyes
David A

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #52 on: 03-05-2004 12:49 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by victor2000:
That's a very interesting point, David, though it gets more confusing the more you think about it....  roll eyes

Nevertheless, it is what happens.
Hedonism Bot

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #53 on: 03-05-2004 14:58 »

What if the vacuum's warmer than the material's melting point; does the gas still sublimate? The moon can reach daytime temperatures of around 130 degrees centigrade. That seems mighty warm for water to be solid.

I'm learning more here than I have in my Physics class...

Oh sure, blame the wizards...
victor2000
Starship Captain
****
« Reply #54 on: 03-05-2004 16:36 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Hedonism Bot:
What if the vacuum's warmer than the material's melting point; does the gas still sublimate? The moon can reach daytime temperatures of around 130 degrees centigrade. That seems mighty warm for water to be solid.
I'm pretty sure that has something to do with absolute zero, but I'm not the smartest guy around, so I wouldn't know.  wink
Teral

Helpy McHelphelp
DOOP Secretary
*
« Reply #55 on: 03-05-2004 19:16 »
« Last Edit on: 03-05-2004 19:16 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Hedonism Bot:
What if the vacuum's warmer than the material's melting point; does the gas still sublimate? The moon can reach daytime temperatures of around 130 degrees centigrade. That seems mighty warm for water to be solid.

I'm learning more here than I have in my Physics class...



It would continue to boil until all heat are removed and then sublimate. If the ice is in direct sunlight (and close enough to the Sun, if it's too far away the sunlight would be too scathered) it would eventually disappear entirely because it get a continous supply of energy, which is also why scientists are looking for ice in cracks, deep craters and other place out of reach for the sun.

Incidently that's also why comets develop a tail when they approach the sun, but don't have one at their aphelion (farthest away from the Sun). When a comet have done enough trips around the sun all ice would have disappeared from them.
ActionLaPointe

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #56 on: 03-12-2004 16:48 »

and there you have it
Shaucker

Professor
*
« Reply #57 on: 03-12-2004 22:07 »

I would think that because of an increase of greenhouse gasses and an increased elevation, that the people of Earth would be used to less pressure and thinner air...that would sorta explain being able to breathe in low pressure, kind of oxygenated areas. Plus, Neptune and Jupiter are still theoretically solid-centered.
Digital Dragon

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #58 on: 03-12-2004 22:54 »

The Neptunian&#8217;s are using their sophisticated technology to create the illusion that their planet is an inhospitable ball of gas in order to keep the aggressive people of the stupid ages away from it. Of course, at some point over the next thousand years our increasing technological advancement will lead us to uncover their ruse and relations will be opened up between our two peoples. Duh.
 
Jish

Delivery Boy
**
« Reply #59 on: 03-27-2004 19:54 »

Here's a little something nobody thought of: Is is possible that the Neptunians and Santa's base are on a moon of Neptune? I know they're solid. Unless of course the Planet Express ship was shown directly going in or out of Neptune's atmosphere, couldn't it just show them flying towards Neptune, and then cuts to a moon?

I don't have the season 3 DVD yet, so I can't look at AToTS to check.
Sm@ Cpt. Libido

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #60 on: 03-28-2004 05:48 »

Magic gotcha
Sm@ Cpt. Libido

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #61 on: 03-28-2004 05:51 »

Quote
Originally posted by Ranadok:
The neptunians could be "colonists" brought in to help out the Robot Santa (selected/engineered to be short).

Didn't the neptunians say they were only shrimpy because santa didn't feed them! Plus Elzar is neptunian yet he seems to be doing fine because he is a chef and therefore has a constant supply of food

Pages: 1 [2] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF | SMF © 2006, Simple Machines | some icons from famfamfam
Legal Notice & Disclaimer: "Futurama" TM and copyright FOX, its related entities and the Curiosity Company. All rights reserved. Any reproduction, duplication or distribution of these materials in any form is expressly prohibited. As a fan site, this Futurama forum, its operators, and any content on the site relating to "Futurama" are not explicitely authorized by Fox or the Curiosity Company.
Page created in 0.118 seconds with 18 queries.