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Author Topic: Stuff in "Bender Should Not Be Allowed on TV"  (Read 485 times)
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evan

Urban Legend
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« on: 08-03-2003 19:42 »

The trivia/goofs thread:

What I first noticed about this episode was the problems with where/when "All My Circuts" is filmed. Sometimes, it seems as though the show is filmed live (hence Antonio breaking down). Other times it seems like its filmed in one take, but on tape-delay.

Also, does Bender fly from NNY to Hollywood every day to act on "All My Circuts"? Were the auditions in NNY, but the show in L.A. or what? That's quite a commute, and I find it hard that the Professor would keep him employeed if he has to travel so much.

Put other goofs here, too.

Bender: "Try this, kids at home!
Warning: do not try this at home
Wonderbee31

Starship Captain
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« Reply #1 on: 08-03-2003 19:57 »

Just a little thing, but having watched Scooby-Doo when I was younger, (and still watch the first season once in a while), during one of the Planet Express shots, at night, I could have swore that I saw, the ghost ufo ship from that show fly over PE.  Also cool that the orphan with the third ear on her forehead showed up at the boy's party.
Teral

Helpy McHelphelp
DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #2 on: 08-03-2003 20:05 »

So how does MacCulcabot (or however his name is spelt) consume alcohol to function? His hands are permanently attached to his cheeks, and his mouth is wide open (so he cant even use a straw). Someone pour it inot his mouth, while he lies on the back?  big grin
Venus

Urban Legend
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« Reply #3 on: 08-03-2003 20:12 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by evan:
The trivia/goofs thread:

What I first noticed about this episode was the problems with where/when "All My Circuts" is filmed. Sometimes, it seems as though the show is filmed live (hence Antonio breaking down). Other times it seems like its filmed in one take, but on tape-delay.


i noticed that too. normal hour long dramas usually shoot for about a week or so, with the scenes shot out of order and then given to an editer who cuts it together and any given ep is usually finished and waiting for several days-several weeks before its actually broadcast. So in actuality they would have had time to get that broken robot fixed, or to cast for a new robot before the casual viewer even knew anything had gone wrong.
MrB

Bending Unit
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« Reply #4 on: 08-03-2003 20:21 »
« Last Edit on: 08-03-2003 20:21 »

Well, Calculon only does ONE take.  So maybe that's why they didn't fix the footage before it aired.  However, it really did give of the impression that it was live.

Anybody catch Zoidberg's "card"?     laff
Anarchist

Professor
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« Reply #5 on: 08-03-2003 20:27 »

I'm not 100% sure about this, but wasn't Tinny Tim's crutch in place of his leg before?
Venus

Urban Legend
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« Reply #6 on: 08-03-2003 20:30 »

one take of each shot. after each shot you have to move the camera. and i don't know about an hour long drama but i know a 20 minute student film has about 60-75 individual shots. So even if Calculon only does one take of each shot thats still over a hundred shots. With different locations. Theres no way to do that live.
Nixorbo

UberMod
DOOP Secretary
*
« Reply #7 on: 08-03-2003 20:41 »
« Last Edit on: 08-03-2003 20:41 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Anarchist:
I'm not 100% sure about this, but wasn't Tinny Tim's crutch in place of his leg before?

Are you asking if he only ever had one leg?  Because no, his right leg has always been there, but "shrivelled."  He's never had two ARMS, maybe that's what you were thinking of.

Now, whether or not it's always been his right arm/leg, that's a different story.

I have a thousand years of power.
"NOOOOO HE WAS MY BROTHER!" and then got tired and slept.


"He has the special talent, though, of being able to help people and make them feel utterly stupid all at the same time. ... In short, he's a great moderator, but a terrible human being."
-SlackJawedMoron
MrB

Bending Unit
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« Reply #8 on: 08-03-2003 20:43 »

Venus, you do realize that they could ( and in fact, did) have more than one camera.  So if Calculon does one take, they could just edit it together with all the camera angles they had.
VelourFog

Space Pope
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« Reply #9 on: 08-03-2003 20:44 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by evan:

Also, does Bender fly from NNY to Hollywood every day to act on "All My Circuts"? Were the auditions in NNY, but the show in L.A. or what? That's quite a commute, and I find it hard that the Professor would keep him employeed if he has to travel so much.


well how long does it take to get to the moon? 4 seconds? I'm sure going to the West Coast is do-able... not like Bender ever does any real work around PE anyway
Venus

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #10 on: 08-03-2003 20:54 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by MrB:
Venus, you do realize that they could ( and in fact, did) have more than one camera.  So if Calculon does one take, they could just edit it together with all the camera angles they had.

yeah technically they could, but they would have to sacrifice a lot of camera angles. They couldn't get close up coverage of an actor as well as a wide angle master shot at the same time. cause the camera getting the close up would be in the frame of the wide angle camera. They could get calculon done in one take then have him leave and just have a standin so that they could get the close ups of monique and other charactors and insert shots. But that still leaves the editer with at least a week to cut it all together and to trim it for time and add background music, foley sounds, and some ADR.
MrB

Bending Unit
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« Reply #11 on: 08-03-2003 21:00 »

Well, that camera getting the close up, wouldn't have to be close at all. It could just be zoomed in.
Venus

Urban Legend
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« Reply #12 on: 08-03-2003 21:19 »

film cameras never use the zoom. i'm not sure why, it was explained to me but i don't remember, cause cameras were never my thing. But from a postproduction standpoint theres no way to do all the editing/audio/music tweaking for an hour long drama and have it looking professional and ready to air in one day. It took me over 2 hours to edit a 3 minute sequence for my student film because of effects i added and background music and dialogue tweaking and such.
Futurama_Hil

Urban Legend
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« Reply #13 on: 08-03-2003 21:20 »

this isn't a goof, but a observation:

the comic book fry is reading is futurama comics #15.
Action Jacktion

Professor
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« Reply #14 on: 08-03-2003 22:31 »

Actually it's an issue of Space Boy, on which Futurama Comics #15 will be based.
canned eggs

Space Pope
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« Reply #15 on: 08-03-2003 22:51 »
« Last Edit on: 08-03-2003 22:51 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Teral:
So how does MacCulcabot (or however his name is spelt) consume alcohol to function? His hands are permanently attached to his cheeks, and his mouth is wide open (so he cant even use a straw). Someone pour it inot his mouth, while he lies on the back?    big grin

He takes it up the ass.

The way the network president put a gun in the CD tray reminded me of a (supposedly true) story I heard about a guy who used his CD tray as a cup holder, broke it, then called tech support to say his cup holder was broken.

And I agree with MrB that the show's not going out live; they did an excellent job of covering their asses when Calculon refused to do two takes.  It explains perfectly why they would leave a malfunctioning robot in the show when it aired.

Edit: Wonderbee, "Spooky Space Kook," episode 69014, Dec 20, 1969.  Without Googling.  Oh Jesus, I'm a loser.
Action Jacktion

Professor
*
« Reply #16 on: 08-03-2003 23:02 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by canned eggs:
The way the network president put a gun in the CD tray reminded me of a (supposedly true) story I heard about a guy who used his CD tray as a cup holder, broke it, then called tech support to say his cup holder was broken.
Was that the same guy who thought the mouse was a foot pedal?
zb

Crustacean
*
« Reply #17 on: 08-04-2003 00:40 »

Okay, this is a real nit-pick, but why is the All My Circuits director wearing a light meter around his neck? Directors never do that sort of work themselves. There are people (or robots) paid to do that!
Venus

Urban Legend
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« Reply #18 on: 08-04-2003 00:54 »

oh, good catch. i missed that one completely and im a film student. I think it's either the DP or the Gaffer that's supposed to carry the light meter. Did you see the woman that stood behind the director with the script? I can tell you with absolute certainty that that was the script superviser. Interesting that they made her a woman. Most script supervisers do tend to be women.
Action Jacktion

Professor
*
« Reply #19 on: 08-04-2003 00:58 »

Why did the "Mommie Dearest" robot have "7.0" on her chest?  I thought it might be a reference to Joan Crawford but I can't think of anything.
Chriswell

Bending Unit
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« Reply #20 on: 08-04-2003 01:09 »

I loved the sign on the studio door.

In parentheses it said (WRITERS NOT ALLOWED).   laff

-cs



"It's toe tappingly tragic."
payn
Bending Unit
***
« Reply #21 on: 08-04-2003 04:30 »

TV is not film.

TV is shot with TV cameras (or digital/HD cameras), not film cameras. The reason you don't use zoom with film cameras is that you can tell the difference between two lenses and one on film. You can't on video. And with digital, it's one lens plus a CCD either way. So zoom is often used, especially with digital (as long as the zoom isn't digital). I think we can assume that by 3003, the networks will have run out of excuses to delay full HDTV (how else can we see Amy's obscene tattoo?).

Also, don't let the fact that they use the exact same titles fool you into thinking that the jobs are at all similar. A TV director isn't the guy in charge, he's the guy who's generally "paid to do that" for the producer (who has creative control over shooting).

The writers being banned from the open set is a different joke in TV than in film as well. On TV, the writers are essentially the assistants (read: slaves) of the executive producer (who has creative control over the whole show). On episodic TV, there are usually a half dozen levels between the writer and the executive producer (with fun titles like "supervising creative supervisor" ), and having three or four useless first-year monkeys sit around and tell inside jokes doesn't help much during filming.

When I used to live around the corner from the Paramount lot (the model for all studios in all animated shows), I often used to run into writers who'd been shooed from the set, hanging out at a deli/liquor store across Gower (now a Starbucks, of course). Many an episode of News Radio was spoiled for me by those bastards....

Meanwhile, soaps are different from normal TV. Because they're on daily, there's no way the usual TV scheduling can work, so they often shoot weeks of the show at a time, then send the actors off on vacation. Similar to animated shows, actually (except South Park).

But if Calculon refused to retake the scene, the network and the owners would have two choices: not show All My Circuits (and refund the advertisers' money), or show it and pretend to be surprised....

By the way, in film, there are a handful of "auteur" directors who like to handle technical details like lighting, but usually it's the DP, or sometimes the AD. The gaffer might carry around the meter and read it off for the DP while he looks through the lens, fiddles with stuff, and generally annoys the cameramen.

Finally, the CD-tray-as-a-cupholder story is an urban legend. The mouse-as-a-foot-pedal is also an urban legend. The similar mouse-as-a-microphone urban legend was also common, until it appeared in Star Trek IV.
zb

Crustacean
*
« Reply #22 on: 08-04-2003 17:38 »

I can't argue with most of what payn said, and I've never worked in TV myself. But, many TV shows are shot with film. Gradually, they  are changing over to digital, but from what I've read, many still use film.
That said, All My Circuits does appear to be using video. Would it be common for a soap shot in digital to use a light meter at all?

BTW, anyone want to hazard a guess as to what Hermes and the Professor were shoving into a crate with rakes? The growling reminded me of the badger from "A Tale of Two Springfields."
spacepilot3000

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #23 on: 08-04-2003 17:45 »

Did any of you guys notice the plug in Bender's but when he plugged in the T.V? If he had a plug in his butt the whole time, why did he have trouble finding a plug in "Obsolutley Fabulous"?
Gocad

Space Pope
****
« Reply #24 on: 08-05-2003 05:15 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by spacepilot3000:
Did any of you guys notice the plug in Bender's but when he plugged in the T.V? If he had a plug in his butt the whole time, why did he have trouble finding a plug in "Obsolutley Fabulous"?

I did say it before, and it looks like I will have to say this again...


payn
Bending Unit
***
« Reply #25 on: 08-06-2003 04:58 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by zb:
I can't argue with most of what payn said, and I've never worked in TV myself. But, many TV shows are shot with film. Gradually, they  are changing over to digital, but from what I've read, many still use film.
There are there major formats, not two: film, video, and digital.* Most miniseries use film. Most comedies, soaps, etc., use video. There's a lot of variety among nighttime dramas. And a small but growing number of shows of all kinds use digital.

You can easily tell the difference if you know what you're looking for. Watch the X-Files (which often switched between film and video for effect), and you'll pick it up.

Anyway, Sony is trying to convince everyone that the only way to do HDTV is to use digital HD cameras. And the company that makes the analog video cameras and tapes isn't arguing, because that's also Sony. So I'm guessing film will be around as a minority player in TV long after Beta is gone.

 
Quote
That said, All My Circuits does appear to be using video. Would it be common for a soap shot in digital to use a light meter at all?

The short answer is: No.

The medium answer is: No soaps are shot in digital yet, but the answer will probably be no.

The long answer follows.

I just found out today (from a writer at Soap Opera Weekly) that not a single daytime soap uses digital, even though Sony has lent them a bunch of HD digital cameras for free, and they're all a bit panicky a recent announcement from NBC that the next step in their big HDTV changeover will be the soaps.

But I can speculate, having worked with HD for netcasts (please don't ask why someone would use a $300K HD camera for a 320x200 6fps MPEG video stream--especially when you have to downconvert to NTSC composite because no encoder can handle HD anyway).

Digital cameras inheretly do a much better job with all kinds of improper lighting conditions than either film or video. And at least the cameras I've worked with have built-in lighting compensation features on top of that.

Film DP's often don't trust this feature, but people who do live TV (and netcasts) with HD cameras rely on it. I'm guessing soaps will go the lazy route and become sloppier with their lighting, so you will probably not see future digital soap directors carrying light meters (unless some Directorbot models have them built in).

* Video means either cameras that record direct to 1" beta or cameras that send an analog NTSC (or PAL or SECAM) signal to a separate VTR/directly to the board. Film means 35mm motion picture cameras. Digital means HD.

Consumer video, film, and digital formats (S-VHS, 16mm, DV, etc.) are sometimes used for effect, or on reality shows, but they're usually called "camcorder" or "16mm" or "DV" etc.

And of course some shows use Maya and/or a team of Korean wageslaves to render each frame, but the networks don't care about those shows too much.
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