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PEEL - The Futurama Message Board    Re-Check/Weird Scenes    It would have taken more time. « previous next »
Author Topic: It would have taken more time.  (Read 474 times)
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-Geek-

Crustacean
*
« on: 06-26-2003 11:40 »
« Last Edit on: 06-26-2003 11:40 »

You know on "A Flight to Remember" when the titanic was sucked into the black hole there are a couple things wrong with that.

1)It would have taken more time than 5 minutes for the ship to get sucked into the black hole.

2)when the ship did get that close. The gravity would have made time slowed down. So one end of the ship would either look like its standing still or moving very slowly.

Dont mess...with the Geek
Fryvilous

Delivery Boy
**
« Reply #1 on: 06-26-2003 11:55 »

If you're noticing how long it took for the ship to get sucked in... you shouldn't be.  You should be noticing how large the ship was compared to the blackhole. ( Too large )
davids

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #2 on: 06-26-2003 12:00 »

You have no idea how big the black hole is. In the episode "the route of all evil" they make a very small black hole.
Fryvilous

Delivery Boy
**
« Reply #3 on: 06-26-2003 12:08 »

Well that was just plain not real, for one thing. You have to have a star significantly larger than our Sun explode in a supernova, and then the resulting gravity of the star makes it crush itself to a very very very very small very high gravity point. If I remember correctly, that is.
Anarchist

Professor
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« Reply #4 on: 06-26-2003 12:15 »

I can explain the lack of a slowdown in time. They were showing it as it happened from the black hole's perspective, not how it happened from the "real time" perspective (which is where you would have noticed the slowdown).
As for the scale - well, one could argue that the black hole was far away, but this isn't the first time there are scale errors in Futurama. (Most notably, the Planet Express ship always chances scale.)
JDHannan

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #5 on: 06-26-2003 12:17 »

Why has no one made fun of this guy for mistaking a black hole for a volcano? <Edna> HA! </Edna>
Fryvilous

Delivery Boy
**
« Reply #6 on: 06-26-2003 12:20 »

Well I was going to, but making fun of people isn't nice. You should know better JD. Tsk tsk.
-Geek-

Crustacean
*
« Reply #7 on: 06-26-2003 12:54 »

opps
my bad..hahahaaahahahhahahahahah ah
the_dudefather

Delivery Boy
**
« Reply #8 on: 06-26-2003 13:18 »

a black hole can be sany size, so it was proboby a small one. the real question is, how big was the nebula?

do blackholes really slow down time, i thought that as scientific mumbo jumbo, but maybe im wrong...
Teral

Helpy McHelphelp
DOOP Secretary
*
« Reply #9 on: 06-26-2003 14:47 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Fryvilous:
Well that was just plain not real, for one thing. You have to have a star significantly larger than our Sun explode in a supernova, and then the resulting gravity of the star makes it crush itself to a very very very very small very high gravity point. If I remember correctly, that is.

Except in theory you could build an artificial black hole, significantly smaller than natural black holes. It's all a matter of compressing matter. In theory, if you build a hydrogen bomb using all the deuterium and tritium in our oceans, the power of the bomb would be sufficient to compress part of it to a singularity.

Ofcourse, since Earth would be devastated in such an explosion, I must advice you not to test it.
SamuelXDiamond

Rectum Favourist
Urban Legend
***
« Reply #10 on: 06-26-2003 15:08 »

Teral, you spoil all my fun.
Fryvilous

Delivery Boy
**
« Reply #11 on: 06-26-2003 15:42 »

Well even if we had one of these theoretically small black holes, wouldn't Cubert and Dwight get sucked in anyway?
Teral

Helpy McHelphelp
DOOP Secretary
*
« Reply #12 on: 06-26-2003 15:49 »

Mayby, it depend on the mass of the black hole.  I guess they used some kind of anti-gravity field.

Sorry, X-man. I could get you some C4 instead.

McGrady

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #13 on: 06-26-2003 18:39 »

The ship would pass through the event horizon (meaning you couldn't see it anymore) before the time dilation would be observable.
-Geek-

Crustacean
*
« Reply #14 on: 06-26-2003 19:07 »
« Last Edit on: 06-26-2003 19:07 »

I disagre McGrady.

Once it passes through the event horizon the ship would be crushed, so you wouldn't be able to see it there.

You would beable to see it long before that.

The ship would have to get flattened out (we saw that) and thats where the time dialation would start)

It wouldn't get flattened and get sucked in 3 seconds. (right after it breaks in half that happens)
McGrady

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #15 on: 06-26-2003 20:28 »

Yeah you're mostly right, I forgot that the time dilation (from the observers pov) happens as the thing you are watching approaches the event horizon and time->infinity at the horizon, not at the core like I was thinking.  (1 - Rs/R)^.5
Britz

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #16 on: 06-27-2003 03:02 »

I think I have a solution to make everyone happy, shut up Geek.
MrB

Bending Unit
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« Reply #17 on: 06-30-2003 15:07 »

MrB says "Black holes just got a helluva lot more complicated."
Kryten

Space Pope
****
« Reply #18 on: 06-30-2003 20:11 »

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