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PEEL - The Futurama Message Board    General Disscussion    I weep for the male gender... « previous next »
Author Topic: I weep for the male gender...  (Read 580 times)
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Gorky

Space Pope
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« Reply #40 on: 02-01-2004 19:55 »
« Last Edit on: 02-14-2004 00:00 »

True. If the Fry/Leela relationship has a particular episode in which it became text and not sub-text, it has to be "Parasites Lost", although, as mentioned before, some season 1 and 2 episodes had a little bit of the romantic plot starting up.

Edit: 2/14/04- I hate the idea of double posting, so I'm just gonna edit this message. I seem to have neglected this earlier, but in "Time Keeps on Slippin'", Fry has to be at his saddest point. What I mean is, I felt more sorry for him in this episode than in any other. I think that this episode had to be one of the best as far as character development goes. You see how much Fry loves Leela, and you start to see that Leela cares for Fry. And, for those of you who have never seen the episode, I'm talking about the ending, Fry just saying "Nothing." and then looking out the window until the end credits.
Gorky

Space Pope
****
« Reply #41 on: 02-17-2004 19:04 »
« Last Edit on: 02-17-2004 19:04 »

I know I hate double-posting, but this is  entirely unrelated to my above post. I apologize.
Anyway, this is about Homer's character. For those of you who haven't seen it, in "Milhouse Doesn't Live Here Anymore", Homer can't think of (or afford) an anniversary gift to buy Marge. His problems are immediately solved when he realizes that he can make money by being a bum.
This is an example of how Homer is really becoming difficult to sympathize with. If the crew had wanted us to feel for Homer, they should have at least had a few minutes devoted to how he saw all of the gifts that he could have bought Marge, but couldn't afford. Then he could have sat down on the street corner, becoming a bum. I know that the crew probably didn't want us to pity Homer, but it could have helped to make him more likable.
I mean, in the beginning of the series, Homer was alot like Fry. Nothing ever went right. After he lost that part of his character and  good fortune just fell from the sky, he lost something: his bond with the common man.
DotheBartman

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #42 on: 02-17-2004 19:09 »
« Last Edit on: 02-17-2004 19:09 »

Well, in this case its important to realize the context of that subplot, which is that, well, it was just a "fun" subplot meant to fill in some time and provide some breaks between the main plot.  I do agree that the show doesn't have quite the same empathetic edge it did in the very earliest seasons, but in that particular case its not as a big a deal I think.

Episodes like "My Mother the Carjacker" and to a lesser extent "I D'ohBot" are a little better at making Homer a lovable and empathetic character I think(in fact both of those follow the "nothing goes right for him" mentality).  But that subplot didn't really intend to be anything more then fun filler.

Oh, and agreed that Time Keeps on Slippin' had some great Fry moments.  That ending was one of the more legitimately touching of the series.
Gorky

Space Pope
****
« Reply #43 on: 02-17-2004 19:17 »

In "My Mother the Carjacker" Homer was at his best, in my opinion. He was sympathetic, and the ending, when he's trying to find another message from his mother, "I, M, O, K! I Am Okay!", is actually, in a way, funny yet touching.
DotheBartman

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #44 on: 02-17-2004 19:34 »

Yeah, they can still do that stuff.  They maybe don't do it as consistantly/often as in the beginning(seasons 1-4 were really the most character-intensive seasons), but they can still do it.

And of course Futurama gained that ability in its later days as well.  In fact its really quite amazing, looking at a character who in the first episode says "yahoo!" when he realizes everyone who knows is gone.  In Jurassic Bark, Luck of the Fryrish, etc, he really becomes a much more empathetic character and his plight can bring a viewer to tears.  What an amazing turnaround.
Gorky

Space Pope
****
« Reply #45 on: 02-17-2004 20:05 »

Yep. As stated earlier, season three, probably starting with "Parasites Lost", was when the characters really started to develop. All of Fry's most sympathetic shows ("Parasites Lost", "Luck of the Fryrish", "Time Keeps on Slippin'", "Jurassic Bark" ) were produced in seasons 3 and 4.
But, as it is always up for debate at PEEL, if the show had went on for another 10 years, chances are, Fry would have lost some of his likability, though Groening and Cohen would have probably been more careful about how Fry's character further developed.
sam004

Delivery Boy
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« Reply #46 on: 03-15-2004 21:33 »

I pitty neather Homer and Frye are both really funny and pretty cool guys.
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