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Author Topic: Nerdiest Futurama joke  (Read 24051 times)
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Slashco

Bending Unit
***
« on: 09-03-2003 21:17 »

I think Futurama has to take the #1 spot for including the most nerdy/esoteric stuff in its scripts. Like this one from Luck of the Fryrish (at the horse races):

Announcer: Checking the electron microscope... And the winner is 3, in a quantum finish!
Professor: No fair! You changed the outcome by observing it! (tears up ticket)

I honestly don't know how many people they were expecting to get that.  smile

I'm pretty sure there are others as well.
Cube_166

Professor
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« Reply #1 on: 09-03-2003 21:18 »

P and NP for example. Now thats the nerdiest joke.
BNLbum

Bending Unit
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« Reply #2 on: 09-03-2003 21:23 »

Discrete and Discreet
Killerfox

Professor
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« Reply #3 on: 09-03-2003 21:41 »

mhh well in AOI1 although it was parody of "Back to the Future: 2" when the Proffesor says:"It looks like  the very fabric of the Space-time coninum has ripped apart.
THAT was nerdy
Futurama_Hil

Urban Legend
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« Reply #4 on: 09-03-2003 21:51 »

Slashco, I thought that was just one of his odd lines, but hey, i aint no nerd (but i am a freak, there's a difference). 

I always found the 01010 robot stuff nerdy. I didnt understand a lot of it until not too long ago. Also star trek jokes are usually nerdy, i dont usually get em.
evan

Urban Legend
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« Reply #5 on: 09-03-2003 22:18 »

All those D'n'D referrences are pretty nerdy. You don't get much worse than Gary Gygax showing up.
Asylum-Fry

Liquid Emperor
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« Reply #6 on: 09-03-2003 22:21 »

Quantum Leek Soup has got to be pretty nerdy.

Yeah the Binary jokes are okay, like the one in The Honking where bender looks in the mirror, reads the binary, screams, and runs. Hehehehe.

Another good nerd joke is the one from The Lesser Of Two Evils. Bender and Flexo say their serial numbers, then when Fry (naturally) doesn't get it, Bender says their both expressable as the sum of two cubes (... or so I thought they said). Sounds nerdy, mostly because it involves math.
ShadowFox

Crustacean
*
« Reply #7 on: 09-03-2003 22:35 »

For those with Season 2 DVDs, the one episode where Cohen explains the math term on the movie sign has to be one of the nerdiest things I have ever heard.
Asylum-Fry

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #8 on: 09-03-2003 22:53 »

The Aleph- ??? Plex? That was confusing, to say the least.
BrainDeadZombie

Delivery Boy
**
« Reply #9 on: 09-03-2003 23:31 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Slashco:
I think Futurama has to take the #1 spot for including the most nerdy/esoteric stuff in its scripts. Like this one from Luck of the Fryrish (at the horse races):

Announcer: Checking the electron microscope... And the winner is 3, in a quantum finish!
Professor: No fair! You changed the outcome by observing it! (tears up ticket)

I honestly don't know how many people they were expecting to get that.   smile

I'm pretty sure there are others as well.

Well I laughed out loud just reading this. Hell, I guess I'm a nerd. Which episode is this from?
Beamer

DOOP Secretary
*
« Reply #10 on: 09-03-2003 23:54 »

He said right before that it was in Luck of the Fryish. You even had the selection of text where he said the episode it was from in the part you quoted...
canned eggs

Space Pope
****
« Reply #11 on: 09-04-2003 00:17 »

Loews aleph-null-plex.  DXC mentions it as the nerdiest joke he can think of on the DVD commentary.  It's funny to me because my father is a set theorist and has written a paper on the continuum hypothesis.  I just read some of it, and every time aleph-null is mentioned, it cracks me up.  Now THAT's nerdy.
Lionel Hutz Esq

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #12 on: 09-04-2003 00:31 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Asylum-Fry:
The Aleph- ??? Plex? That was confusing, to say the least.

Mostly to see what I remeber of this, and thanks to Issac Asimov, for explaining it to me:

Aleph-nul (The first letter of the Hebrew alphabet, sub 0) equals standard infinity.  In other words, all the counting numbers and rational numbers.  1, 12, 1/2, 23/45 etc. This is the smallest form of infinity, and is also symbolised by the sideways 8.

Aleph-1 equals the number of points in a line.  Take a line, and while you can find a point equal to all the rational numbers and counting numbers, there are also points that cannot be represented by rational numbers.  These are the irrationals, such as pi, e, and the square root of 2 (most roots, actually).  I was a philosophy major, not a math major, so I won't go into the proof, but basically, there are more points in any line than all the counting numbers and rationals combined.  Both are limitless, but Aleph-1 is always bigger.

To screw with your minds more.  While never proven, Aleph-2 would be an even larger infiity, possibly equal to all the curves in a plane.  (I am twenty years out of date on this, if DXC or Keeler are hanging around, let me know if it is proven yet).  For a similar reason as above, this set is always bigger than Aleph-1.

And, as far as I know, you can have Aleph-1000 or anything.  But I have to admit, my mind has problems with that.

Any math majors who want to add to this, feel free.

What makes a good man go neutral?  Lust for gold? Power? Or were you just born with a heart full of neutrality?[/b]
canned eggs

Space Pope
****
« Reply #13 on: 09-04-2003 00:54 »
« Last Edit on: 09-04-2003 00:54 »

Cool, I didn't see those 2 posts above mine. 

Aleph-null is the transfinite cardinal for countably infinite sets.  It is the number of rational numbers.

Aleph-one is the "next level" of infinity above aleph-null, the first cardinal for uncountably infinite sets.

So aleph-one may or may not be the number of points on a line.  the number of points on a line (the number of real numbers) is called c, the continuum.  The continuum hypothesis is the hypothesis that aleph-one is c.  Goedel proved that the continuum hypothesis was consistent with all the other laws of set theory, but it's never been proved and is not accepted as an axiom of set theory.  Incidentally, my father thinks it can be proved, that was the point of his paper.

Edit: 500th post.  Starship Captain ahoy!

canned eggs: all rights reserved, all wrongs reversed.
Asylum-Fry

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #14 on: 09-04-2003 00:54 »

Oh... infinity. Gotcha. *rereads the explanation with a look of complete bafflement*

Math is my final frontier... I'm a bit weak in that area of learning. I can follow patterns and solve problems, but that's the extent of my A-work. Don't even get me started about graphs *shudders*
[-mArc-]

Administrator
Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #15 on: 09-04-2003 01:25 »

I wanna try, too :P Hope I get it right  wink
Any set with the cardinality Aleph_0 can in theory be put on a list (given infitite time/paper/pencils, seeing that the list is gonna be infinitely long). So, you can come up with a strategy of putting them in a linear order. When I ask you "what's on #56", you have an answer and when I ask "where's this and that element out of the set", you have an answer. Also, you never have two elements on the same spot in the list.

With Aleph_1, you can't find such a strategy.

/isn't a math major but got enough math in informatics
Pitt Clemens

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #16 on: 09-04-2003 03:33 »
« Last Edit on: 09-04-2003 03:33 »

The chronotons are effecting our DNA, and Bender's Robot, or "RNA"

Using the syringe on the bloated can, to get botox.

That and the club that was name Schrodinger's cat box or something...Leave me alone, it's late.

Still, it's never too late to edit.

Also, I think I get that Aleph-# stuff.  It's like how there will alwayse be more rational numbers than odd nubers on a simple numberline, but both are still infinfite.  It's just taking this principle and applying it to geometry, so that the infinite points can be applied to space rather than abstract nuberlines.
canned eggs

Space Pope
****
« Reply #17 on: 09-04-2003 03:47 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by [-mArc-]:
Any set with the cardinality Aleph_0 can in theory be put on a list (given infitite time/paper/pencils, seeing that the list is gonna be infinitely long). So, you can come up with a strategy of putting them in a linear order. When I ask you "what's on #56", you have an answer and when I ask "where's this and that element out of the set", you have an answer. Also, you never have two elements on the same spot in the list.

With Aleph_1, you can't find such a strategy.

/isn't a math major but got enough math in informatics

With c you can't find such a strategy, it remains to be proven whether this is true of aleph one.  What this amounts to is: the real numbers are uncountable.

Cantor used a "diagonalization argument" to prove this.  Consider the reals between 0 and 1, represented as decimal numbers. Assume they can be arranged in a list. Build a new decimal as follows. Make the nth digit anything other than the nth digit of the nth number on the list. (you also have to avoid the digits 0 and 9). You will always construct a number that does not appear on the list.  In other words, it is impossible to exhaustively list all the real numbers, even in theory.

I'm not a math major either, but meh.
Lionel Hutz Esq

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #18 on: 09-04-2003 04:23 »
« Last Edit on: 09-04-2003 04:23 »

I keep worrying some 13 year-old on this board will read this and become a math major.  What level of hell do we non-math majors get for doing that?

If anyone is interested in this, I highly recommend Asimov on Numbers.  A good layman's introduction to the math jokes that make Futurama what it is.
Cube_166

Professor
*
« Reply #19 on: 09-04-2003 05:55 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Lionel Hutz Esq:
Aleph-nul (The first letter of the Hebrew alphabet, sub 0) equals standard infinity.  In other words, all the counting numbers and rational numbers.  1, 12, 1/2, 23/45 etc. This is the smallest form of infinity, and is also symbolised by the sideways 8.
Aleph-1 equals the number of points in a line.  Take a line, and while you can find a point equal to all the rational numbers and counting numbers, there are also points that cannot be represented by rational numbers.  These are the irrationals, such as pi, e, and the square root of 2 (most roots, actually).  I was a philosophy major, not a math major, so I won't go into the proof, but basically, there are more points in any line than all the counting numbers and rationals combined.  Both are limitless, but Aleph-1 is always bigger.
To screw with your minds more.  While never proven, Aleph-2 would be an even larger infiity, possibly equal to all the curves in a plane.  (I am twenty years out of date on this, if DXC or Keeler are hanging around, let me know if it is proven yet).  For a similar reason as above, this set is always bigger than Aleph-1.
And, as far as I know, you can have Aleph-1000 or anything.  But I have to admit, my mind has problems with that.

My god! I can't believe that I understand that.
ThreeDLou

Delivery Boy
**
« Reply #20 on: 09-04-2003 08:02 »

I have to think that the fact that this one particular joke has been discussed this long is pretty funny. 

Also, Madison Square is a CUBE!  HA!  Nerds Unite!
Teral

Helpy McHelphelp
DOOP Secretary
*
« Reply #21 on: 09-04-2003 10:11 »

The Strong Force crazy glue and Grand Unified School District bus was pretty neat.
Mercapto

Professor
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« Reply #22 on: 09-04-2003 10:16 »

Scrödinger's Kit-Kat Club always cracks me up.
Asylum-Fry

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #23 on: 09-04-2003 10:28 »

Lionel, I really, highly doubt I'm going to become a math major all of a sudden. It's a genetic thing.

I may as well say now that I'm 14.
foxyboxing

Delivery Boy
**
« Reply #24 on: 09-04-2003 10:54 »
« Last Edit on: 09-04-2003 10:54 »

I love how this thread simply pointing out jokes that are nerdy has turned into an all out calculator weilding nerd-fest.  So cute. (I'm a sucker for science and math geeks, what can I say...)

My contribution....

I'm a big fan of the

10 Home
20 Sweet
30 Go to 10

needlepoint in Bender & Fry's first apartment (can't go wrong with a good Basic joke in my book)

Also, the Gary Gygax appearance- "Here take my +1 mace"- priceless...

And of course the
SOCRATES - VOS SAVANT - COGNITRON
inscription on one of the buildings at Mars University...

so many layers of nerdiness in Futurama... It's like a big beautiful dork buffet.
Goldfish

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #25 on: 09-04-2003 11:42 »

Condensed milt (PYHOMS), funny when you find out what it is.
Pitt Clemens

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #26 on: 09-04-2003 14:03 »

President Truman busting out of a box of canned eggs...I still don't get it, not a history nerd.

Also every time I see Canned Eggs post it bugs me.  At the risk of sounding ignorant, what does it mean?
canned eggs

Space Pope
****
« Reply #27 on: 09-04-2003 14:22 »

I have no idea.
Asylum-Fry

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #28 on: 09-04-2003 20:22 »

Canned Eggs... odd concept. Reminds me of Canned Bread from Spongebob Squarepants (my brothers watched it all the time, it was inevitable for me not to see it).
Killerfox

Professor
*
« Reply #29 on: 09-04-2003 20:35 »

mhhhh math & science nerds talking!!!!
WOW well i like those two fields very mich but as i am only 15 i didnt understand everything, I like Math riddles, i dont stop until i gety it right!
j w wimpy
Delivery Boy
**
« Reply #30 on: 09-04-2003 21:52 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Lionel Hutz Esq:
If anyone is interested in this, I highly recommend Asimov on Numbers.  A good layman's introduction to the math jokes that make Futurama what it is.

I recommend any book entitled "Asimov on...". I have five myself, including the chemistry, physics, numbers, astronomy tomes.

The scene where Bender mentions that his and Flexo's serial numbers both can be expressed as sums of two cubes of course got me going. I wrote a little BASIC program and found one easily. I couldn't find the other until I realized that that you can cube negative numbers and get a negative (Duhhh...)
Lionel Hutz Esq

Bending Unit
***
« Reply #31 on: 09-04-2003 23:07 »

I have all the Asimov on books too.  They are great, and you can pick them up cheap used. 

Perhaps the scariest part of this is that none of us are math majors.  I guess that makes us uber-geeks.

Can anyone explain the P and NP joke?  I'm at a lost on that.

Finally, I think the symposia joke is my favorite nerd joke.
Asylum-Fry

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #32 on: 09-04-2003 23:10 »

P and NP? What episode is that from?
HoosierBot

Crustacean
*
« Reply #33 on: 09-05-2003 00:53 »

The P and NP joke and the Aleph-naught joke were things that were only in the background. I liked them, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty joke("no fair, you changed the outcome by measuring it" ) was so great because it was actually part of the script. When that episode was first aired I got a good laugh out of that joke, and then tried to explain it to my friends without any success.
[-mArc-]

Administrator
Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #34 on: 09-05-2003 01:20 »

Here's the P/NP one:

The question in computer science with these is whether they're distinct classes of problems (and most think they're not). The two books indicate that they are distinct.
canned eggs

Space Pope
****
« Reply #35 on: 09-05-2003 03:46 »

There's P/NP discussion already in another thread.

 http://www.peelified.com/cgi-bin/Futurama/3-000279/

I don't think I have anything to add to the discussion there.
Killerfox

Professor
*
« Reply #36 on: 09-05-2003 20:07 »

mhhh Symposia i was going to look that word in the dictionary but.... im just too lazy.

why do you call it the P/NP?????
newhook_1

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #37 on: 09-05-2003 20:11 »

calculon: "do you have an extra goto 10 line?"

It's a BASIC joke. 10 is where the program useually starts so if he had an extra goto 10 line bender would be stuck in a loop.
Smitty

Professor
*
« Reply #38 on: 09-05-2003 20:19 »

 
Quote
Originally posted by Cube_166:
P and NP for example. Now thats the nerdiest joke.

Second. The extra one after it that was hidden made it even funnier.
Asylum-Fry

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #39 on: 09-05-2003 20:22 »

Do Amy and Fry have the same blood type? If they didn't, then wouldn't Amy's body have refused Fry's cells and clotted his blood till it killed him?

Then again, Fry and the Professor are genetically similar. And where did Zoidberg get the string (and knowledge) to stitch Fry's head onto her shoulder?
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