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Author Topic: Futurama Game Design Project  (Read 3973 times)
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Artisan219

Crustacean
*
« on: 12-17-2014 23:59 »

Alright, where to start?

Well, I suppose I should first say that while I'm new to these forums, I am a long-time fan of Futurama and I'm sorry to see it go (again).

Which brings me to the reason I joined today. I am a game designer... or rather I should say that I am qualified to be a game designer. After college, I met a girl and had two kids. So in the interest of developing new portfolio work, I'm now in the process of working on designing levels in UDK, one such project happens to be my attempt to design as much of a Futurama game as possible.

I'm doing this as a personal project, but I have plans to use this personal project as a pitch to crowd-fund a bid to acquire the licence/rights to the series and release a full version. Games have served as official sequels for other franchises like Ghostbusters, Back to the Future, Jurassic Park, and to an extent, the Firefly game coming out in spring, so I think a Futurama game is overdue (Yeah, I know there already was a Futurama game, but that was over a decade ago and I think the overlap between Futurama fans and gamers is substantial enough that I'm shocked this hasn't already been done).

I'm intending to model a full version of the Planet Express building, the ship, Fry and Bender's apartment, sections of the Nimbus, and would like to at least have some prep work on the whole of New New York (Vampire State Building, tubes, etc.) Gameplay will be multifaceted: Wandering New New York, flying the ship as Leela, building crazy inventions as the Professor, delivering packages to various planets as Fry, cooking alien recipes or committing crimes as Bender, etc.

I'm looking at modeling the characters in a realistic style rather than their cartoon forms. My reasoning is a little self-serving in that it makes for better portfolio pieces, but also I think we're unlikely to ever see a live action movie, so I think it'd just be an interesting spin on it.



(This is not my image, but it is illustrative of the style I want to use. Bender and the robots will pose a huge artistic challenge.)

I do have some plot ideas, and the game as a whole will play out a lot of sub-stories. My big conflict right now is Nixon's efforts to build his Dyson fence and the fallout it has on other planets. Some of my other plans involve Kif finally getting sick of Zapp and quitting the DOOP to move in with Amy, Fry and Leela actually going through an engagement without having a time travel accident, Bender trying to find a new "chump" to replace Fry, I also want to explore some of the relationship between Zoidberg and Marianne since they only had just the one episode, and I have ideas to include the original crew from the space whale in some capacity.

So  at this point in my rant, you may be wondering why I'm posting all this. Well, quite simply, I would like some help. Modeling the PlanEx building alone is not a simple endeavor. I need a lot of reference images from the show for each room, on top of the fact that some elements of the building and ship are variable (the downstairs walrus tank, the maternifuge, the cage for the lion, etc) so there's that. Also, I'm very much open to feedback and story suggestions. A video game can easily exceed twenty hours of play, so that equates to at least another movie, if not a whole new season's worth of story.

Well, I suppose that's it for now. Thanks for reading. Curious to see what kind of response I'll get from the forum.
totalnerd undercanada

DOOP Ubersecretary
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« Reply #1 on: 12-18-2014 02:44 »

I was excited about this up until you said you'd be using "realistic" character models. Having read that part, I think it'll be an interesting exercise in how to make a technically great game which sucks in practice due to the graphics being either too weird for people to get into when juxtaposed with the environments, or just too complex to render well without resulting in an un-necessarily bloated monster if you want more than five minutes of actual gameplay.

Good luck.
UnrealLegend

Space Pope
****
« Reply #2 on: 12-18-2014 05:50 »

I was excited about this up until you said you'd be using "realistic" character models. Having read that part, I think it'll be an interesting exercise in how to make a technically great game which sucks in practice due to the graphics being either too weird for people to get into when juxtaposed with the environments, or just too complex to render well without resulting in an un-necessarily bloated monster if you want more than five minutes of actual gameplay.

Good luck.

An ideal solution would be to make the realistic models an option.

While it's not true to its roots, that Zoidberg picture is pretty badass and I wouldn't mind seeing the other characters in a similar style.
Artisan219

Crustacean
*
« Reply #3 on: 12-18-2014 07:38 »

I was excited about this up until you said you'd be using "realistic" character models. Having read that part, I think it'll be an interesting exercise in how to make a technically great game which sucks in practice due to the graphics being either too weird for people to get into when juxtaposed with the environments, or just too complex to render well without resulting in an un-necessarily bloated monster if you want more than five minutes of actual gameplay.

Good luck.

You're entitled to your opinion, and if you feel this isn't going to be your cup of tea, that's fine. I'm aware that jumping from the Groening style to something else is going to have something of an alienation (no pun intended) effect on some of the die hard fans. For me, I don't see the artistic style as affecting too much of the character of the show, but that's me. Like I said, I have my personal inclinations, but also what I feel are good reasons for the realistic style. As I mentioned, I don't think we're ever going to see a live-action movie, so in some ways, I wanted to address that visually. I want the game to be immersive, so that the player feels like part of the crew, so I wanted to blur out the cartoon a little. Also, on a more practical note, if you look at the PS2 game for Futurama or even Simpsons Hit & Run, the particulars of Groening's style are fine for drawn characters but do have some issues when done in 3D. And while much has been done with cell-shader technology, going to the trouble of modeling 3D characters and then trying to make them look hand-drawn wasn't something that appealed to me (and cell-shaders can also really kill render times).

And perhaps this is me over-thinking it, but games are expensive to produce. I'm looking at making the main cast (Fry, Bender, Leela, Dr. Zoidberg, Prof. Farnsworth, Amy, Hermes, maybe Nibbler and Cubert), so seven to nine characters and a very elaborate interior space. The best floor plan for the Planet Express building I found online has over a dozen rooms. This is a lot of work for no pay, and I can't sell the game without permission. So if I want this to become more than a portfolio piece, I want to have the highest possible production value to try my Kickstarter pitch.

And to your point about the complexity becoming a rendering issue, I really don't see that as being much of an issue. I'm using UDK, which is to say that this would be an Unreal game, much like Batman: Arkham City. I have no intention of modeling that much of New New York till further down the road, but Arkham was able to handle a mind-boggling level of detail without crashing. Granted, I never played Arkham on a PC, but my point is simply that there are game design tricks for handling complexity.



Look, I could spend a lot of time trying to get you on my side, but bottom line, if you feel it's not for you, that's cool. I would like you to keep in mind though that it'll be some time before I have anything you can see, so for now, it's kind of like a really big fan-fiction project intended to be interactive, and whether or not you're appreciative of the artistic style, I'm hoping you might at least find the other aspects appealing.

While it's not true to its roots, that Zoidberg picture is pretty badass and I wouldn't mind seeing the other characters in a similar style.

That Zoidberg image is almost cinema quality, and I'm not planning on going into that much detail (polygon limitations) but it was a big inspiration for me to aim for the realistic style. As far as seeing other characters in a similar style, I found this rendering of another artist's take on Leela.



If you look at it, I don't see much lost in the transition. The eye looks okay (the cyclops eye means the nose has no bridge and she by default has a unibrow, so anatomically, Leela poses more challenge than one might think), and to be honest, I wasn't really planning to do much in terms of bells and whistles. But even with the more complex pants, the incredibly over-detailed boots, and the full-arm interpretation of that "thing she wears on her wrist", I still recognize this as Leela.
totalnerd undercanada

DOOP Ubersecretary
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« Reply #4 on: 12-19-2014 19:46 »

And to your point about the complexity becoming a rendering issue, I really don't see that as being much of an issue.

That Zoidberg image is almost cinema quality, and I'm not planning on going into that much detail (polygon limitations)

Well of course you're not going to see rendering in a realistic style as an issue if you intend to have shit-tier resolution of the actual gameplay graphics. roll eyes

If you're planning on making a "realistic" zoidberg that looks as good as that image, you're going to have to plan on cinematic quality of resolution in order to do it justice. Otherwise you might as well make do with a pink blob that has "Z" written on it.

my point is simply that there are game design tricks for handling complexity.

The oldest trick in the book for handling complexity is to make all your hyper-realistic models look and move like disintegrating shit at the bottom of the ocean. Then you can have as many of them on screen as you like, rampaging through a near-infinite, randomly-generated cityscape.

If you want something to look good though, you're going to have to both pay attention to character and level design, and make sure that it renders in all its complex and immersive glory as your player pokes into the corners that you never thought they would, or puts the character model into positions that it just wasn't designed with an eye towards.

whether or not you're appreciative of the artistic style

I love seeing the realistic characters. I just also hate that too often there's abysmally shitty render quality for gloriously detailed character models, and I hate it to the point where I would rather have a Minecraft Steve than something wonderfully and painstakingly detailed being run as a kludgy mess that doesn't look half as good as a Groening style model would, but takes seven times the processor power to depict.

If you want realism, you're going to have to plan on cinematic display quality in order to do it any justice at all. That just doesn't seem feasible for an independently-developed game. Either figure on using similar models to the Xbox version of the Futurama game (still not perfect, but better than the PS2's rendering for the in-gameplay stuff), or cell-shaded models. Otherwise you're going to need to pitch the idea to the big companies and risk them telling you to fuck off before procuring the license themselves and cranking it out without paying you a penny.
Artisan219

Crustacean
*
« Reply #5 on: 12-19-2014 21:47 »
« Last Edit on: 12-20-2014 01:30 »

The oldest trick in the book for handling complexity is to make all your hyper-realistic models look and move like disintegrating shit at the bottom of the ocean. Then you can have as many of them on screen as you like, rampaging through a near-infinite, randomly-generated cityscape.

There are all sorts of ways to sell high-level realism in games while still acknowledging hardware limitations. I'm planning on rendering the environments with DLOD, and I'm going to make up for the character poly-limits using normal maps. These are very easy cheats, used in a lot of games, and very much doable in UDK. Like I said, this is the same engine that runs Arkham City, so it's not some unrealistic goal to make a walkable city.

I'm not trying to talk down here, as you do seem to have an understanding of the limitations of game design, but for those that aren't savvy to game production, I think I should include a little bit of explanation for these techniques.

In game design, DLOD stands for discrere level of detail. The more geometry in any given object, the more processing power it takes to render. So to model an entire city block of buildings would demand a lot out of the rendering engine. A DLOD approach basically assigns diminishing levels of detail to each object in a scene so that objects in the distance are rendered at a lower level of detail.



In this example, the rabbit loses polygons as its distance from the camera increases.



In this diagram, you can see that at any given time, the camera only shows a wedge of the actual environment, shown here in green. Most of the scene is out of sight. And as objects recede into the distance, they're given progressively less priority to the rendering enging and thus a lower LOD.

I love seeing the realistic characters. I just also hate that too often there's abysmally shitty render quality for gloriously detailed character models, and I hate it to the point where I would rather have a Minecraft Steve than something wonderfully and painstakingly detailed being run as a kludgy mess that doesn't look half as good as a Groening style model would, but takes seven times the processor power to depict.

If you want realism, you're going to have to plan on cinematic display quality in order to do it any justice at all. That just doesn't seem feasible for an independently-developed game. Either figure on using similar models to the Xbox version of the Futurama game (still not perfect, but better than the PS2's rendering for the in-gameplay stuff), or cell-shaded models.

This brings me to normal maps. A normal map, for those that don't know, is a texuring feature wherein the game artists use a higher-detail version of the object to generate a special kind of displacement map so that the in-game object will appear to have details that are not allowable in its geometry.



In this shot, you can see the geometry for the in-game character, how the character looks with smoothing groups applied, the high-detail version for the normal map, and finally the textured in-game appearance. The normal map allows the surface of the in-game character to interact with light and shadow as though it has more geometry than it does.

Otherwise you're going to need to pitch the idea to the big companies and risk them telling you to fuck off before procuring the license themselves and cranking it out without paying you a penny.

Yeah, this is a concern, but I'm not worried about it. While I don't own the rights to Futurama, I'm still undertaking a fair amount of game-play implementation (flight controls, map design, etc) which does have value. For now, this is a fun hobby. It saves me from having to make up my own characters or settings, and worse-case scenario, I develop something I can't use in any other capacity. But even if a bigger company does acquire the usage rights, this is preproduction work that still has value in that it could potentially save them a lot of man-hours. If I don't make a dime, that doesn't set me back, it just doens't move me forward. That sounds like a dumb philosophy, and it very well probably is, but the game design industry is littered with projects that got pulled at various stages.


External links:

Level of Detail
Normal mapping
Quantum Neutrino Field

Liquid Emperor
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« Reply #6 on: 12-20-2014 13:14 »

That's pretty interesting, but the project itself seems very ambitious.

I want the game to be immersive, so that the player feels like part of the crew, so I wanted to blur out the cartoon a little.

I think that moving away from cartoon style would do the opposite. The realistic graphics wouldn't probably feel the same as the show anymore, but other than that, I can see why you'd prefer them.
Artisan219

Crustacean
*
« Reply #7 on: 12-20-2014 17:38 »

Look, I understand the concerns about changing the style. But at this point, I feel like it's the only element we're actually discussing.

What I really wanted from this thread was a little help compiling reference images of the interior rooms of the Planet Express building and also of the New New York cityscape. I'm aware that the design of the city isn't fixed and varies episode to episode, hence the reason I'm asking for a little help.

I'd also like to shoot around ideas for plot and story.

In Decision 3012, Nixon makes a campaign promise to build a Dyson fence around the solar system to keep out illegal aliens. This would be the overall conflict of my game, as Earth would ultimately violate its obligations to the DOOP in doing so. In practice, this would give a reason for Kif to resign, it would give a reason to visit a plethora of other planets, it would present a reason for Lrr to once again try to attack Earth, would present a business venture for Mom, something for Leela to protest, and would create a black market enterprise for Bender to start smuggling foreign aliens into Earth.

One mission I had in mind was to revisit Kif's tadpoles. When Kif's home planet shuts down ties to Earth, Kif has to decide whether or not to live on Earth or his home planet, and when he chooses to move in with Amy, that means they have to relocate the tadpoles to Earth. The crew would have to navigate Amphibios 9 and round up all the toddler tadpoles. Back on Earth, Scruffy would be installing a giant aquarium in Amy's apartment.

Another open-purpose plot involves new inventions. In Neutopia, Leela remarks that "teleporters won't be invented for another fifteen years, according to that guy from the future." This gave me the idea to have the Professor invent some kind of stargate knock-off. Game-wise, this is a device to revisit planets after you've completed a level, but plot-wise, this means that the Planet Express building is functionally a giant back door to the Dyson fence. Bender would almost immediately become a coyote, charging fees to smuggle in illegals.

Also, while it might be a little contrite, I did want to do a retake of Meanwhile, recycling the first four minutes but then, since Farnsworth never invented the time button, having it diverge. This means that Fry and Leela could have a longer engagement. One of the immediate consequences would have Fry move in with Leela. Taking a lesson from I, Roommate, I see Bender doing everything in his power to keep Fry from moving out, but then accepting it and having to "find a new chump," as he'd put it.
totalnerd undercanada

DOOP Ubersecretary
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« Reply #8 on: 12-20-2014 23:03 »

Look, I understand the concerns about changing the style. But at this point, I feel like it's the only element we're actually discussing.

What I really wanted from this thread was a little help compiling reference images of the interior rooms of the Planet Express building and also of the New New York cityscape.

laff This used to be the sort of place where people would help you with that. Not so much anymore. Criticism is free, but help will generally cost you in one way or another.

With that said, there are maps available of the PX building in various threads on this board, both from the original game and from show-based speculation. There are also some maps of the cityscape.

But what I think this needs is for somebody with a little time on their hands to sit down and make a few notes about the relative position of the major rooms we've seen (things like the angry dome and the accusing parlour could be left out, since they're essentially single-scene gags), and the relative position of the PX building to the river, landmarks, buildings we know about (eg, the lesbian coven and the pottery barn which are both across the street), and trying to place them on a map of present-day Manhattan.

I may have a go at the broad strokes of that myself, since I'm not rushed off my feet right now. But then again, I might just find myself busy pretty soon. If I post something on the topic, then consider yourself helped. If not, then just keep hoping that somebody else has a go.

The three plot threads of the game sound okay, if a little derivative, but the re-take of Meanwhile sounds like a godawful premise for any gameplay whatsoever. But it does seem like a potential minigame if you revise the idea to simply having Bender walk around and look for people to beat up and rob. Y'know, whilst he's not got other plot elements to service.

That's about as helpful as I'll get for a little while. Once again, good luck.
UnrealLegend

Space Pope
****
« Reply #9 on: 12-21-2014 00:27 »

IF you're still wanting input for the layout of the building, the Planet Express floor plan you linked earlier is likely the best you'll find. It's definitely the best I've seen before.
Artisan219

Crustacean
*
« Reply #10 on: 12-21-2014 02:42 »

Well the reason I wanted to use Meanwhile was simply because it's where the fans were left off, and also it would still serve its purpose as just being a catalyst for Fry to propose. My thought on gameplay was simply to use this as the tutorial level, as I realize it isn't a lot to work with for interactivity. But even so, it would allow the player to walk around the building, interacting with other characters, getting the package on the ship, and having Leela fly to the moon (teaching the player how to fly the ship). On the moon, you would have to deliver the package.

Now in the episode, they just dropped it in the slot, but the package was labeled as being urgent, so I might have the game diverge there and offer the player options. You could drop it in the slot, actually deliver it, or maybe explore the park first and then come back. I'd rather not have to model and animate the Mecha-Hexadecapus, as you can imagine how much work that would be, but perhaps I could have it explode in the distance and then as Bender you'd have to ditch park security.

The key point to this mission would be that, regardless of your choices, Leela would suffer some sort of life-threatening accident.
2pintz
Poppler
*
« Reply #11 on: 01-28-2015 12:42 »

Sounds an interesting project!

As an aside (and I would have created a new thread for this but this seemed an apporpriate one to mention it on) does anyone know whether anyone has tried to port the PS2/Xbox  Futurama game over to PC?

Could allow for people to upgrade the graphics to make them more sharp / hi def as well as potentially great new levels or remove previous glitches etc.
winna

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« Reply #12 on: 01-29-2015 09:56 »

Artisan219, your project does sound terribly ambitious.  I'm also not sure what established would be the interest gameplay wise.  I guess that other futurama game was kind of a third person shooter, I dunno.  If you're building a portfolio, I'd just suggest building an interactive area where you can walk around, or maybe have that moon mission thing, but given the level of complexity in your fully fledged game, and seeing how you're probably the only one on the design team, for your project I probably wouldn't choose to make a fully fledged game.

I say this because I have attempted making a fully fledged futurama game (rpg), but I did it in a 2d medium, and just making all of the assets was pretty redonculous; which becomes magnitudes worse since you're going to make full 3d models of all of these things.  As a portfolio piece, in my opinion, one interactive environment would suffice to get your point across and whet your artistic appetite, including going with the realistic design.

I'm not sure if anyone has blueprints of the PE (Planet Express) building, but I know ANSTATMAW has blueprints of the PE ship.  Both places have rooms that come and go btw; ie neither of them are actually structurally concrete.  Sometimes the PE building has a front foyer and sometimes it physically cannot occupy such a space, so you can actually use a lot of artistic license in such departments.  Anyways, having half-ass made futurama games, and watched other people and teams develop futurama games, I wish you luck in your endeavors.  At some point, maybe I'll make some more half-ass futurama games, I still have a few ideas on the back burner; I've no terrible desire to work in the 3d arena though.
Artisan219

Crustacean
*
« Reply #13 on: 02-01-2015 07:16 »

Yeah, I'll be the first to admit that I'm not doing all this on my own. I'm good, but I just don't have the time to do everything by myself. I can model the core crew, model each room, one by one, model the ship, and do just what you said. If you've ever played the Ghostbusters game, it'd be basically the same thing as the firehouse. So it'd be impressive from a design standpoint, but wouldn't really have any gameplay.

That being said, I can map out the buildings of New New York, maps of alien worlds, make up story arcs, etc. Preproduction has a lot of work and I can do a decent amount of work just to incite interest.

I have no real idea how to get the rights usage though, so that's something. At worst, I end up with a portfolio piece and a lot of fan-generated images for the internet. I am willing to do a lot of legwork on the pre-production, but I'm going to need more people on this if I actually want to do the game, and I'm going to need money to get those people, and that means I'd have to sell the product, which means I do have to get the rights. I'm probably pushing the limit of fair use and protections for transformative works as it is, but for now it's just for fun.
winna

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« Reply #14 on: 02-02-2015 07:09 »

Sounds like a decent plan.  If you can model the things you say: PE Ship, PE building, and crew and put them in a semi-interactive environment, I think that would be good enough as a demonstrative piece.

If you absolutely wanted to make a game from there, you could have kind of fair use (until Fox shuts you down) and you'd probably generate interest for a team of other talented people who would be willing to work on it in their spare time.  This has occurred with a futurama game once that I know of; a group of people here on PEEL set out to create a futurama point and click game.  I may still have a demo of it lying around somewhere, but the project did die at some point.  I knew quite a few of the people on the team, and talked the lead guy a lot at the time.  They were pretty organized, even going so far as to create a master color palette for images produced.  I'm not sure why I died, or can't remember, but these sorts of projects from my perspective require an enormous amount of dedication, considering people are giving away their free time for free.

If you were going to make the game commercially... after having built the models and placed them in an interactive environment, you might potentially be able to ship that around to developers and communicate the possibility of it getting produced, you having demonstrated the concept.  Game development houses are businesses, so it wouldn't be unreasonable that they might have a way to get Fox's attention and get rights to produce such a game.  The risk you take on this route is that your vision can be altered/manipulated/taking away from you at any point, but I do see it as a realistic possibility if that's what you want.

The very absolute largest thing you have with what you're undertaking, in my perspective from hanging around random game making communities, is that you have to be able to show something if you're going to ask for anything.  People who can do things won't take you seriously if you have nothing in your hands, and people who can't do things will cling to your idea and suggest all sorts of insane (from a production standpoint) things to add to it.  You've demonstrated a knowledge of model making, so I presume you can do that.  I suggest doing it and showing it off.  This is an okay place to start with that (there are a few artists and futurama afficianados still around here), but you might also fish other places out... unreal communities might be a great resource to you.  I know skins/models have been made for unreal games before.  The Futurama Madhouse (if it's still active) may also be a place to seek out assistance.  Haven't been there in ages myself.

As for the specs on the buildings and stuff (and this becomes more of a problem if your project gets larger), I'd suggest making a much smaller post in this thread asking for just that.  Most people, I think, aren't going to read your posts.  Somebody may have an idea of that information and may be able to take the time and express well what you're asking for.  This thread also technically belongs in the fanart forum, but because the board is slow right now, you'll probably scope under the radar for awhile.  The specs on what you're asking for now, as I said, are actually not concrete.  You can either watch a few episodes and guess out/make up how the PE building is built... but even hammering that out most exactly would probably require (at the very least) a full original 72 episode watch.  For large portions of NNY, you're absolutely going to require that, and probably watching every episode would be generally necessary.  If you end up mapping out NNY, you're also going to have a fun time guessing/making up the in betweens: for example, what buildings lie between the PE building and Bender's apartment building?  I ended up dealing with this problem when I made a futurama rpg once.  I lazily cheated and made up a bunch of semi-crazy looking buildings that essentially repeated themselves over and over (I was like 15 at the time).  The PE ship is better... somebody did write out the specs there, here's a link:

http://reocities.com/Area51/omega/5795/planetblueprints.html

That information is also most likely dated now.  I think it says in the article that the PE ship layout changes, even in the early episodes, so inconsistency is your enemy here.

If you're at all interested in that rpg I said I made (never finished), I'll get you a link for that too:

http://ssfuturama.intya.cz/info/underconst/under_dboy.php

It isn't accurate at all, but it might be helpful in some way.  At one point I was working on adding the sewers too.  The pictures on that page should be enough to turn you off though. smile

Anyways, good luck with your project!  I'd help out more, but honestly I don't have any free time, and if I did, I'd probably be working on my own personal projects.
Freako

Urban Legend
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« Reply #15 on: 02-15-2015 03:53 »

You could always remake BARON BENDER'S BIPLANE ADVENTURE!

NERROOOOOOOOOW!!
winna

Avatar Czar
DOOP Ubersecretary
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« Reply #16 on: 02-15-2015 04:43 »

I had/have sequels planned; just don't have time or proper location to work on it.  Plus the technology evolved while I wasn't looking. frown

Also, I'm rusty. frown

I'll let you know if/when I start working on it again; the first sequel is called BOOTLEG BENDER'S BOOTYLICIOUS BOATRIDE ADVENTURE.  or something along those lines... shifty
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