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Author Topic: Why Netflix?  (Read 3049 times)
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KurtPikachu2001

Urban Legend
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« on: 09-16-2013 14:55 »

If Futurama ever did come back, why do you all want Netflix to air it?  Why not FXX, FOX, or just have it go back on Adult Swim?  Adult Swim is where it got the most notarity.

My Manwich

Liquid Emperor
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« Reply #1 on: 09-16-2013 14:59 »

You can choose which episodes to watch maybe?
Quantum Neutrino Field

Liquid Emperor
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« Reply #2 on: 09-16-2013 15:09 »

I guess it's the most probable option, maybe even profitable...
Beamer

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #3 on: 09-16-2013 15:11 »

Kurt, it's not a case of "Netflix is the one we want more," it's a case of "Netflix is the most likely option given budget issues and general circumstances." If you actually bothered to read anyone else's posts, you would realise this.
GedeWK

Bending Unit
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« Reply #4 on: 09-16-2013 15:23 »

Anyone wouldn't miss an episode if futurama is airing on netflix. The problem just netflix is not available in some country. oh right, CC isnt either.But theres some trick for worldwide netflix!
Beamer

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #5 on: 09-16-2013 17:51 »

Netflix original series generally get a DVD release about 6 months after their Netflix premiere, not to mention there'd be international syndication, as there currently is with the Comedy Central run (not to mention other Netflix shows like House of Cards and the new season of Arrested Development, both of which are airing here like regular shows). All it affects is how the show would be distributed immediately upon release; nothing would really change in the long run as far as that part's concerned. The logical factors land more on budgetary concerns and whether or not there's an audience for such a thing... So far every "online streaming" show has been heavily serialised so as to attract people to purchasing an entire season in one hit. Futurama's got a different M.O. there.
MeatablePie

Professor
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« Reply #6 on: 09-17-2013 00:19 »

Anyone remember when Futurama was on TBS for 4 years where they aired reruns?
MuchAdo

Professor
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« Reply #7 on: 09-17-2013 00:31 »

I'd honestly prefer if they just did a few more DVD/BD movies in about three years... not another 52 episodes.

Perhaps do three big stories, and try and get all the old writers back for what would be the end forever.
Lost My Phone

Professor
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« Reply #8 on: 09-17-2013 23:19 »

FXX is not available to everyone.

Fox hates Futurama.

Adult Swim probably would not be able to fund new episodes.

There you have it.

I don't have Netflix, but if new episodes of Futurama were to be produced for Netflix, I'd be willing to subscribe. It's not like Futurama would be the only thing I'd get.
PNS2CLT
Crustacean
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« Reply #9 on: 09-22-2013 20:14 »

Adult Swim is owned by Turner, which agreed to renew American Dad for an eleventh-season after Fox decided to cancel it at the conclusion of the upcoming tenth season; new AD episodes will air on Turner, with encore showings on AS.  Turner paid $2M per episode for the cable rights to Big Bang Theory, USA paid $1.2M for Modern Family, Netflix paid $3M per original episode of Arrested Development.  New episodes of Futurama would probably fall somewhere near these ranges, so affordability isn't as big an issue as most are lead to believe.  Sad to say, but other networks probably just don't perceive the series to be as viable as we would like them to.

(Note that the jury's still out on the viability of Nextflix's original series, including AD.)
Lost My Phone

Professor
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« Reply #10 on: 09-23-2013 03:29 »

The thing about that, though, is that while TBS and Adult Swim are both owned by Turner, Turner isn't the one making these kinds of decisions. Turner doesn't just give TBS and Adult Swim money; they have to get money on their own. TBS has a higher budget than AS does; therefore, TBS can afford to fund new episodes of American Dad, and they'd probably be able to do the same with Futurama, whereas AS wouldn't be able to.
Beamer

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #11 on: 09-23-2013 03:37 »
« Last Edit on: 09-23-2013 03:38 »

You're also comparing broadcast/syndication expenses with production expenses, and they're two very different ballgames here. Ultimately, the decisions don't come down to the same people.

Don't think for a second that it matters who holds the title of network president; It really doesn't. There's much more to it than that.
PNS2CLT
Crustacean
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« Reply #12 on: 09-23-2013 04:30 »
« Last Edit on: 09-23-2013 04:34 »

While TBS & AS are two separate networks with the same parent, undoubtedly there's enough mutual decision making to enter into duel high-cost production arrangements, such as American Dad (in which new episodes will air on AS shortly after TBS, as they do following Fox now).  The percentage of audience unique to AS is estimated as high as 80% (that is, 80% of the people watching AS watch nothing but AS -- e.g. they do not view first-run episodes of American Dad on Fox, but rather AS) so it's fair to say we're taking about two separate audiences.

And I'm comparing first-run production costs & syndication costs because the reason it's believed Netflix commissioned a 15-episode order to Arrested Development was because of the increasing high costs of syndication (up 700% in just a few years).  In other words, if it costs Netflix an additional $10M to purchase a new 13-episode order of Futurama over the cost to license an incumbent season, and Netflix sees original, exclusive content as a key to maintain & attract new members, it'd make plenty sense for them to order the new season.  Unfortunately, Netflix is enduring much criticism from Wall Street for its decision to produce original content.  (Note that this is similar reasoning to why Turner purchased new episodes of American Dad -- the gap between the purchase of new content & the cost to license older content has shrunk such that TBS sees profit in a new order).
Lost My Phone

Professor
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« Reply #13 on: 09-24-2013 04:42 »

While TBS & AS are two separate networks with the same parent, undoubtedly there's enough mutual decision making to enter into duel high-cost production arrangements, such as American Dad (in which new episodes will air on AS shortly after TBS, as they do following Fox now).  The percentage of audience unique to AS is estimated as high as 80% (that is, 80% of the people watching AS watch nothing but AS -- e.g. they do not view first-run episodes of American Dad on Fox, but rather AS) so it's fair to say we're taking about two separate audiences.

So you're saying that because TBS will be broadcasting first-run episodes of American Dad, it will have the right to distribute the episodes to AS for syndication? American Dad won't actually be owned by TBS in 2014; it'll still be owned by 20th Century Fox, the same way Futurama was still owned by 20th Century Fox during its Comedy Central run.

And I'm comparing first-run production costs & syndication costs because the reason it's believed Netflix commissioned a 15-episode order to Arrested Development was because of the increasing high costs of syndication (up 700% in just a few years).  In other words, if it costs Netflix an additional $10M to purchase a new 13-episode order of Futurama over the cost to license an incumbent season, and Netflix sees original, exclusive content as a key to maintain & attract new members, it'd make plenty sense for them to order the new season.  Unfortunately, Netflix is enduring much criticism from Wall Street for its decision to produce original content.  (Note that this is similar reasoning to why Turner purchased new episodes of American Dad -- the gap between the purchase of new content & the cost to license older content has shrunk such that TBS sees profit in a new order).

In your original post, you were making it sound like TBS purchasing the syndication rights to The Big Bang Theory, which is currently still on the air, is the same as TBS picking up American Dad after it was canceled by Fox. As someone mentioned above, first-run production costs and syndication costs are not coming from the same budget. The people at TBS who decided to pick up TBBT's syndication rights are not the same folks who decided that new American Dad episodes would be a good investment.
PNS2CLT
Crustacean
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« Reply #14 on: 09-24-2013 07:52 »

So you're saying that because TBS will be broadcasting first-run episodes of American Dad, it will have the right to distribute the episodes to AS for syndication? American Dad won't actually be owned by TBS in 2014; it'll still be owned by 20th Century Fox, the same way Futurama was still owned by 20th Century Fox during its Comedy Central run.

It's already been confirmed that the eleventh season of American Dad will initially air on TBS, with encores following on Adult Swim ultimately joining the daily rotation.   I'm confused as to why you're adamant that first-run production & syndication arrangements must be hammered out in separate, network-specific contracts, because as illustrated by AD, it's untrue.  Pricing is based on contracts, and a single, bundled price may be offered to a parent covering a blanket of networks (and that parent will exercise cost accounting standards to create internal costs).  Reportedly, Fox has began shopping The Simpsons around (which likely means the series is/will be ending) and due to the high costs associated with the acquiring the series, it will be offered with flexible terms so that any parent company acquiring the series may spread it among their umbrella of networks.

It's also commonplace for networks to add contract clauses enabling them to gain a piece of the syndication rights.  Circa 2007, CBS, for example, guaranteed orders for 110-episodes of 20 Century-owned How I Met Your Mother if it obtained a certain threshold in syndication fees for them.  And last year, TBS renewed ABC's Cougar Town but reportedly received rights to some syndication fees (terrestrial & future cable).  Comedy Central (Viacom) likely earns some fees from terrestrial syndication of Futurama as well as those from global broadcasts.


In your original post, you were making it sound like TBS purchasing the syndication rights to The Big Bang Theory, which is currently still on the air, is the same as TBS picking up American Dad after it was canceled by Fox. As someone mentioned above, first-run production costs and syndication costs are not coming from the same budget. The people at TBS who decided to pick up TBBT's syndication rights are not the same folks who decided that new American Dad episodes would be a good investment.

That's a misnomer.  There are no separate budgets for new production & syndication production; it's the same people who decide what content the network wants to air and at what cost.  The reason you're seeing a surge in original content, including renewals of cancelled network series, among subscription providers is due to high costs in licensing (syndicating) content - up over 700% in just a few years, as I noted above.  While first-run production is always going to be more expensive, the gap has closed & providers see value in offering exclusive content.

For example, earlier this year executives at Comedy Central needed to decide: Do we want to renew Futurama?  Or do we want to consider licensing an off-network broadcast, such as Bob's Burgers?  Maybe we'll produce another new series, such as a low-cost standup show.  Or maybe our viewers are satisfied watching re-runs of Tosh.O or South Park. 

It's definitely the same people making the decisions. 
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