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PEEL - The Futurama Message Board    General Disscussion    Everything Is Worse Now! (Part II) « previous next »
Author Topic: Everything Is Worse Now! (Part II)  (Read 5005 times)
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PEE Poll: Is Futurama in decline?
I don't like Futurama much anyway.
The original run was much better.
The original run was a little better.
The new run is just as good as the original.
Decline began partway through the original run.
Undecided.

UnrealLegend

Space Pope
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« Reply #40 on: 08-29-2012 02:24 »

I've just been thinking about the difference between the new and old run, and it has come to my realisation that compared to the new episodes, the old ones are much more driven by dialogue rather than visual gags. Think of classics like "Future Stock". Most of the humour comes from the dialogue, and it's one of the most quotable episodes of the series.

Compare that to a new episode like "Near-Death Wish". That episode is mostly driven by character interaction as well as visual gags, but ultimately feels a little bit empty. I think too many episodes try to have this big epic plot and it leaves less room for the slower-paced ones.

Thankfully not every new episode is like this. "Zapp Dingbat" was mostly driven by dialogue, which is why it's one of my favourites of this season.
cyber_turnip

Urban Legend
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« Reply #41 on: 08-29-2012 11:33 »

Honestly, I think the show's being hit hard by its reduced writing staff. Do they even still have staff-writers that just throw gags at them?

I've started another run through from start to finish and season 1's episodes are so densely packed full of jokes, it's like a completely different show. Season 7 is still funny, but it's gone from non-stop gags to maybe a gag every 30 seconds, and it's not like all of those gags hit. In fact, Futurama (and other shows like this) have never had a consistent gag output, it's just that they throw so many gags at you that even if 5 miss, 1 hits every minute and you feel satisfied.

So yeah... it just feels like there are less people pumping the episodes full of humour now.

On top of the stupid plotting making its way into a handful of episodes.
Louiswuenator

Starship Captain
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« Reply #42 on: 08-29-2012 18:28 »

Thankfully not every new episode is like this. "Zapp Dingbat" was mostly driven by dialogue, which is why it's one of my favourites of this season.
ZB is mine too, for the exact same reason.

So yeah... it just feels like there are less people pumping the episodes full of humour now. On top of the stupid plotting making its way into a handful of episodes.
Doc Hammer and Jackson Publick don't seem to have that problem.

You know, I always thought Futurama could benefit from having fewer writers and a more focused vision, but perhaps I was wrong.  It doesn't seem to be working.
Boxy Robot

Starship Captain
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« Reply #43 on: 08-29-2012 18:51 »

It's pretty obvious that the original run was better. The real question here should be how MUCH better is it, in which my response would be 'not that much'. When comparing average episodes of the show (say "A Lesser of Two Evils" with "The Theif of Baghead") they are pretty much equal. The new run also measures up in the outstanding episode department with some of the best this and last season easily measuring up to the greats of the original run.

The only thing that really brings my view of the new seasons down are the amount of bad episodes being released. In the original run there may have been maybe one or two (possibly even three) episodes that were considered 'bad' or really below average. But comparing this with the new run where around six episodes are in that department and a lot more that are really average - that's what lets the new run down...
DannyJC13

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #44 on: 08-29-2012 20:33 »

It's pretty obvious that the original run was better.

In your opinion.
Gorky

Space Pope
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« Reply #45 on: 08-29-2012 23:19 »

"Teenage Mutant Leela's Hurdles" is on Comedy Central right now. It's one of my all-time favorite episodes, but I haven't seen it in over a year; since my Futurama viewing has lately been confined only to new-run episodes, I'm noticing a lot about this beloved episode that is lacking from seasons six and seven.* And it's not just the joke-per-minute ratio--which, as cyber_turnip notes, is much lower in the new run; it's not just the pacing, or the proportion of visual gags to verbal ones.

There's something else that's missing: a kind of unabashed weirdness, an unapologetic quirkiness, a proud geekiness--in short, a shunning of the mainstream, Family Guy-esque humor that I too often see in the newer episodes. The original run marches to the beat of its own drummer, whereas the new run takes far too many cues from contemporary animated sitcoms. It's more imitative than individualistic (at least in terms of gags and storytelling. The plots still occasionally dazzle me with their originality, but the execution often leaves much to be desired). There are isolated moments of delightful oddness and daring experimentation in the new run--"The Prisoner of Benda" comes to mind, as does "Reincarnation"--but the original run was far more inventive, far truer to itself than the new run usually is. 

And that kind of sucks. But it doesn't mean that I'm not still satisfied with the new run, overall. It simply means that I'll never love most of these new episodes the same way I love most of the old ones. Allow me to (attempt) to explain, in the most long-winded and sappy way possible...

The original run, and season four in particular, is so close to my heart. I mean, watching TMLH right now, I can't help but smile. The original run, by virtue of my having seen every episode contained therein about a gazillion times, is so familiar and comforting to me; it's like visiting with an old friend.

And I know that sounds corny and effusive, but it's true: I love the original run in a way that I'll never love the new run, no matter what heights of brilliance it may reach. I have a ten-year history with the old run (and four years where I had only those 72 episodes to cling to); not so with the new run, which I enjoy immensely but feel less of an immediate and personal connection to.

Call that sad, if you want--tell me that my nostalgia about the old episodes  is blinding me to the many positive attributes of the new ones--but I can't help feeling that way. And besides, I generally rate the new episodes higher than the majority of my fellow PEELers--it's not like I'm just being negative for negativity's sake here.
Tedward

Professor
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« Reply #46 on: 08-30-2012 06:03 »

I'm noticing a lot about this beloved episode that is lacking from seasons six and seven.*

You led us on a long-winded and sappy (though much appreciated) journey through your personal thoughts on the original run, yes, but where is the long-winded and sappy footnote that this asterisk was going to introduce? Don't leave us hanging!
Gorky

Space Pope
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« Reply #47 on: 08-30-2012 06:12 »

Oh, damn it; I had originally meant to mark that digression with an asterisk and put it in spoiler tags so that PEELers with sense enough to skip my ramblings could do so more easily...but then I tweaked it so that the digression fit more comfortably into the proper body of the post, rendering the spoiler tags (and asterisk) pointless.

I could make some kind of clever analogy between my own post-composing carelessness and the Futurama writers' seemingly cavalier attitude about certain aspects of the new run, but I'm far too lazy to do so.*

*
Otis P Jivefunk

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #48 on: 08-30-2012 13:29 »

Honestly, I think the show's being hit hard by its reduced writing staff. Do they even still have staff-writers that just throw gags at them?

I've started another run through from start to finish and season 1's episodes are so densely packed full of jokes, it's like a completely different show.

I think you've hit the nail on the head, the reduced writing staff is quite an apparent disadvantage. In general there are less jokes and the dialogue isn't as witty and fast paced. Most of the older episodes were rammed full of them!...

Having less writing staff is bound to make it harder, and therefore part of the feel of Futurama isn't fully there in many of these new eps. Instead it's hiding in the shadows and only comes out when it feels like it. There are exceptions, such as Möbius Dick and Reincarnation which are both fast paced and packed full of jokes which remind me of the old way of doing things, in particular from a humour point of view. There's just less of this now...
coldangel

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #49 on: 08-30-2012 15:16 »

If they need new writers to pitch ideas at them, they ought to turn to us. We're always saying amusing things. And for free! Except Winna, who's just confusing and scary and expensive.
Mongo

Bending Unit
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« Reply #50 on: 08-30-2012 15:43 »

I think you've hit the nail on the head, the reduced writing staff is quite an apparent disadvantage. In general there are less jokes and the dialogue isn't as witty and fast paced.

The reduced writing staff is a real problem, all right, but if Comedy Central had a choice between ordering new episodes with a reduced budget (and hence reduced writing staff) and not picking up the show at all, I think they made the right decision.  Even though I wish that the old writing staff size had been retained.
Otis P Jivefunk

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #51 on: 08-30-2012 16:19 »

True, given the choice having new Futurama with these constraints and limitations is better than having no Futurama at all, but it's still suffering due to them. I guess it is a compromise we have to put up with, but the consequences contribute to the nature of this thread...
Zoo Station

Crustacean
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« Reply #52 on: 08-30-2012 19:02 »
« Last Edit on: 08-30-2012 19:11 »

This is an interesting question and one I've found myself pondering since the show came back on the air a couple years ago. Overall, I still love the show and eagerly tune in each week (it's one of the only TV shows I still keep up with, the other being Doctor Who).

However, I do have to admit that I've found the new episodes to be a bit more hit or miss than with the original run. I think the main issue for me is that the pacing and humor seem too forced. I feel like the writers too often cram as much as they can into an episode and keep it running at a lightening-fast pace instead of letting the characters just be themselves and setting each joke up carefully. The witty dialogue and slow-moving stories of the original run seem to be in lower demand and that's what I loved about the show in first place.

My favorite current episodes (The Late Philip J. Fry, Benderama, The Prisoner of Benda) work because they have breathing room and take care to give the characters and jokes the setup and time necessary to really be effective. I don't mind pop culture references as long as they make sense; when they're thrown needlessly into an episode it feels more like padding and after having three or four in an episode I start to grow a bit weary of them. I would just like to see the writers take their time and focus more on witty dialogue and interesting stories and let those drive the pacing instead of the time constraints driving the tone of the episode.

This is one reason why I gave up on The Big Bang Theory after season three. They added in too many unnecessary characters and toned down the geeky nature of the show in favor of more sex jokes and stupid plot lines made no sense. Futurama is in no way close to that kind of disaster and I still love the show dearly. Every episode has made me laugh and entertained me to some extent, even the weaker ones. I think it's still full of great characters and wonderful adventures, not to mention it still has heart and can make me smile and laugh more than any other program out there. I would just like to see them RELAX and let the jokes and stories breathe a bit more. They've been doing a better job of that with every season and I'm already looking forward to what the next season will bring. It's far and away the best show on television and I'm just thankful we still have a chance to watch it, both when they hit it out of the park and when it misses the bullseye by a few inches. smile
DannyJC13

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #53 on: 09-26-2012 20:23 »

I dunno why everyone hates the violence when it's just as bad if not worse in The Simpsons.

Not sure which episode it was, but a robot saws a chunk of Homer's head off, and he sticks it back on perfectly with a piece of chewed gum...

And just as I am typing this out now, I'm watching an episode where many elderly citizens around Springfield have taken a drug to make them less grumpy and now their eyes are fucking dangling out of their skulls and they're behaving perfectly.
Boxy Robot

Starship Captain
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« Reply #54 on: 09-26-2012 20:26 »

I dunno why everyone hates the violence when it's just as bad if not worse in The Simpsons.

Not sure which episode it was, but a robot saws a chunk of Homer's head off, and he sticks it back on perfectly with a piece of chewed gum...

And just as I am typing this out now, I'm watching an episode where many elderly citizens around Springfield have taken a drug to make them less grumpy and now their eyes are fucking dangling out of their skulls and they're behaving perfectly.

You really did happen to tune in on the most extreme examples of violence in the show :P
spira

Liquid Emperor
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« Reply #55 on: 09-27-2012 08:24 »

I don't care how much violence The Simpsons has. That doesn't make it less stupid in Futurama.
UnrealLegend

Space Pope
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« Reply #56 on: 10-14-2012 14:04 »

I've said this before, and I'll say it again.

The violence is great when it makes a contribution of some kind to the plot. Hermes chopping himself up was fine. Fry and Leela's arms falling off wasn't. It was stupid. (Although the violin gag afterwards made up for it a bit.)
Gorky

Space Pope
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« Reply #57 on: 10-14-2012 19:56 »

Agreed about the violence, UrL--except, damn it, I still can't help loving "A Farewell to Arms," dismemberments and all. I think my justification there, silly though it may be, is that Fry and Leela losing their arms is the obvious (albeit, grotesque and extreme) conclusion to a story point that's been building throughout the episode: namely, that bad things of escalating consequence happen to Leela whenever Fry offers her his hand.

I'm not saying that the arm thing was the only way that particular story could have concluded--and, in fact, I would've preferred it if the writers had gone a classier route. I'm simply arguing that it makes a degree of sense, in the context of an episode where each result of Leela taking Fry's hand is more unfortunate for her than the last, that the final hand-taking attempt ends in an arm-losing extravaganza. I mean, what else could reasonably top him taking her hand and consequently dooming her to a narrowly-avoided death on Mars? 
Inquisitor Hein
Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #58 on: 10-14-2012 20:26 »
« Last Edit on: 10-14-2012 20:27 »

Futurama's allowed "exaggeration level" -not only in regard to violence- was certainly increased over the time.
E.g. in "Butterjunk effect", Fry and Leela lifted/pulled rocks bigger than them, and the rock falling on Fry had no grave consequences. In earlier episodes, this would have lead to a serious injury.
While e.g. in "Where no Fan has gone before", fans were already rolling their eyes when Leela lifted the rockOnly the classic Star Trek reference made it acceptable as a joke. Also, Leela tripping over the couch in BBA was considered by some on a "Geeez...it's not possible to turn that weight, and it served no major purpose. Now, was that REALLY necessary?" basis.

Violence/Exaggeration: As major plot devices, plot drivers and showdowns: Certainly (E.g. 300 Big Boys with Flash-Fry was hilarious). But please not as simple throwaway gags.
Mr Snrub

Urban Legend
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« Reply #59 on: 10-14-2012 20:59 »

And Zoidberg chopping off Fry's arm and him not feeling even an ounce of pain from it in WMIBACIL is the outlier in this theory?
Inquisitor Hein
Liquid Emperor
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« Reply #60 on: 10-14-2012 23:42 »

Not really.
As I already stated:
Violence/Exaggeration as plot drivers, just not as throwaway jokes.
The big rock falling on Fry in Butterjunk effect was just some throwaway gag, never to be mentioned again, not to bear any significant meaning.
Zoidberg chopping Fry's arm off was
- A shock element, handicapping/injuring Fry in a way that he already seem to have lost the duel.
- A surprise element, by Fry taking his arm and using it was a weapon.
- Carefully playing out that scene, featuring a complete choreography about "armed combat"
- A final joke refering to Fry getting painkillers, hinting at the absurdity of Fry initially not feeling pain (and suddenly he feels it).

Therefore, it is rather an important plot device, a mutilation serving a storytelling purpose. While e.g. Fry getting hit by the rock in "Butterjunk effect" was just some throwaway gag, forgotten in the next scene, and therefore not really necessary.
Mr Snrub

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #61 on: 10-15-2012 00:29 »

While not exactly throwaway, the plot could have progressed perfectly well without it. The things you mentioned , while all true, aren't all that important to the story. A far as I can tell, the only difference is that one was executed a lot better than the other. It's the same joke, essentially.
Another old run episode that does it is IDAR, when the T-Rex eats Fry's hands, 'heals' in the next scene and then they are never mentioned again.
Jezzem

Urban Legend
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« Reply #62 on: 10-15-2012 03:53 »

Yeah, but those two examples are from the original run, so they're comedy gold. Like in season 3 when eBay is referenced and it's totally hilarious, but then Facebook is referenced in season 6 and it's a sign that the show is going downhill! It's like they don't even live in the future anymore!
UnrealLegend

Space Pope
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« Reply #63 on: 10-15-2012 04:27 »

In all fairness, the original eBay reference was futuristic. Not like season 6's "lol im usingh facebook rite now XD"
Gorky

Space Pope
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« Reply #64 on: 10-15-2012 20:55 »

In all fairness, the original eBay reference was futuristic.

Speaking as someone who enjoys both the "Little 'e,' big 'B'?" and "I'm Facebooking right now" gags, I don't see how the former is any less anachronistic than the latter. I'll grant that the eBay gag is a bit more organic-seeming, in that it's as much a contemporary reference as it is a play on Leela's naivete. Like, its humor is at least partially character-driven, which is certainly a plus.

And I'll grant that the Facebook reference in "Cold Warriors" is a bit more of a blatant name drop. It doesn't do anything new with the concept of what Facebook is in the thirtieth century--but, hey, neither does the gag in "A Leela of Her Own." But since the eBay joke is now ten years old and it still doesn't feel dated, I'd imagine that the Facebook reference will remain relevant--or at least recognizable--a decade from now. So I'm willing to give it a pass.
UnrealLegend

Space Pope
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« Reply #65 on: 10-16-2012 00:50 »

Oh, I've seen "A Leela if Her Own" maybe twice in my life, so I totally forgot about that. I thought we were talking about the eBay joke in "A Bicyclops Built for Two". My bad.
Sof

Bending Unit
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« Reply #66 on: 10-16-2012 07:51 »
« Last Edit on: 10-16-2012 07:53 »

Both are good, personally I don't get it why the people get annoyed when they see pop culture in the show,the original run had them too.

About the episodes,not everything in the original run is perfect as seems,I can remember some bad and average episodes,but...with the time I started to like episodes that I used to dislike,same with the newer episodes. (For example when I saw "The Silence of The Clamps" for first time, I HATED it but then I re-watched it like 3 or 4 times and thought "wow this isn't too bad after all").

My problems with the new run are the "we were cancelled" jokes 1 or 2 times are ok ,but when they do it often...starts to get boring.

Also now, they focus in the Fry/Leela relationship almost all the time,personally I think that Futurama is more than romance...so yeah I really miss the episodes where Fry,Bender and Leela are doing stuff together as friends or episodes about Fry without the need to make him whine for Leela's love or he's crying because Bender's gone...yeah I know that Fry can be hard to write,but come on! he has a hobbies and life ,there you have good material for some episodes.

And I want to make it clear, Fry/Leela is a good pairing but not is all the show ,so I'm sorry if this offended some people.

But anyways, I still enjoy Futurama and stills being good!
Otis P Jivefunk

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #67 on: 10-16-2012 19:19 »

personally I don't get it why the people get annoyed when they see pop culture in the show,the original run had them too.

They weren't good then though either...
Gorky

Space Pope
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« Reply #68 on: 10-16-2012 23:34 »

Wait, isn't one of your favorite episodes "Fry and the Slurm Factory"? tongue

I'm not just trolling, either: It's worth noting that the original run has a number of parody episodes that are essentially extended pop culture references. Season one alone has "A Flight to Remember," "Mars University," and "Fry and the Slurm Factory." I like all three of those episodes fine, and generally speaking one-off pop culture references (like the eBay or Facebook examples mentioned earlier) tend to bug me more than fully-realized parodies (which require more effort on the writers' parts)--but, like Sof notes, it's not like the original run existed in some kind of pop cultural vacuum. 

I know that the pop culture references most people are bothered by are contemporary, soon-to-be-dated ones, but still. The above tirade is just something that occurred to me upon reading Otis's post is all; make of it what you will.
Otis P Jivefunk

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #69 on: 10-17-2012 00:47 »
« Last Edit on: 10-17-2012 00:48 »

Yeah I was under the assumption that when Sof said pop culture, they forgot to include the word "jokes" afterwards, due to the fact they later said the original run had "them"; being the jokes. I guess they could have been referring to parodies, but based on the previous conversation I wouldn't have thought so...

To me pop culture jokes and pop culture parodies are different ball games. Pop culture jokes often failed miserably in the original run just as they do now, but pop culture parodies in the original run were quite simply marvellous, especially those examples you pointed out there Gorky...

In the new run though, not quite so. Yo Leela Leela a bit of a failed pop culture parody, the parody of kids TV shows. It isn't quite as obvious or direct in its particular given reference, but as a whole it fails to be funny of clever in what it's parodying, and to use any kids TV show as the basis for an episode, directly or in-directly is a pop-culture fail for Futurama...
AllEggsIn1Basket

Professor
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« Reply #70 on: 10-17-2012 15:11 »

I know I've said it elsewhere, but I thought Yo Leela Leela was quite good. While it may be a stretch to think this, I thought they did a great job of commenting on how ridiculous programming for children has become. About a week or so back I watched a recommended  clip of Mr. Rogers defending his public programming funding in front of Congress (the Senate, I believe). I remember watching Mr. Rogers growing up and that was truly a quality program for kids. Had the Futurama staff tried to parody that or Sesame Street I think it would have been a failed pop culture parody as it would have rung hollow and felt cruel. However, they chose to poke fun at a bunch of dancing pastries and troll-haired tubes, a real nadir in children's programming.
Scent of Glass
Crustacean
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« Reply #71 on: 10-19-2012 05:58 »

I don't care how much violence The Simpsons has. That doesn't make it less stupid in Futurama.

But in Futurama, it actually makes since, because they're in a futuristic world. Whether the mutilations are stupid or not, that's still a fact. However, the Simpsons is supposed to take place in a suburban city during our time, yet it has more violence than Futurama. It's probably because of lack of ideas.

And honestly, the original run was better in my eyes, even if it did have lacklusters. The main problem with the new run is that they just try too hard to be funny. It's pretty much taking inspiration from Family Guy or The Simpsons; which is of course, a bad thing.
UnrealLegend

Space Pope
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« Reply #72 on: 10-19-2012 06:28 »

Avoiding inspiration from the Simpsons would be incredibly difficult when working so closely with Matt Groening.

And I see what you mean about the show trying hard to be funny. I think it still succeeds in being genuinely funny a lot of the time, but a few times there's an unfunny gag that drags on for too long. The bath scene in "Near-Death Wish" comes to mind. Leela and Amy being disgusted by the Professor being naked isn't clever humour. It's much funnier when he's loitering about in the nude and nobody bats an eyelid (See: "Xmas Story", Bender's Big Score).

Hehe. That also reminds me of the Scene in Bender's Game where a naked, wet Leela is violently shaking Fry, and he manages to somehow keep his eyes on her face. tongue

Anyway, I still enjoyed 7A, so I won't complain too much. I think I might wait until 7B hits DVD/Blu Ray before I watch it, just so I can see them all at once.
Tastes Like Fry

Urban Legend
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« Reply #73 on: 10-19-2012 07:01 »

How the entire crew manage to shower together and not bat an eyelid or perv on each other. I think Fry only did once and that was Freedom day.
Mr Snrub

Urban Legend
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« Reply #74 on: 10-19-2012 18:44 »

It's one of my favourite ongoing jokes, along with the crew not giving a shit (mostly) when someone else in the crew is injured.
Inquisitor Hein
Liquid Emperor
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« Reply #75 on: 10-19-2012 18:53 »

Hehe. That also reminds me of the Scene in Bender's Game where a naked, wet Leela is violently shaking Fry, and he manages to somehow keep his eyes on her face. tongue

These scenes show that the show takes place in the fantastic genre, and not reality big grin

Well..in season 7, Leela could probably begin to strip in front of Fry, just to be shot down with a "Not now, Leela...I am waiting for Jehova's Witnesses to knock on the door" big grin
Mr Snrub

Urban Legend
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« Reply #76 on: 10-19-2012 19:20 »

"Not now Leela, I'm trying to see how long I can go without my toes touching each other."
UnrealLegend

Space Pope
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« Reply #77 on: 10-19-2012 20:38 »

"Not now Leela, I'm trying to see how long I can milk this joke until it isn't funny anymore."
 tongue  roll eyes
sparkybarky

Liquid Emperor
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« Reply #78 on: 10-20-2012 00:02 »

I prefer that joke to any of the other running gags, including "I'm 40% <fill in the blank>!"

"Not now, Leela, I'm reading my National Enquirer!
totalnerd undercanada

DOOP Ubersecretary
**
« Reply #79 on: 10-31-2012 14:15 »

It occurs to me that there are two types of people in this thread. One that sees Futurama as being no different now than it was before cancellation, and one that sees a difference.

It further occurs to me that the dividing line between these two sets may well be the attention to and appreciation of nuance. One group is able to appreciate just where the differences lie (and if they are, they see a decline), but the other group not only can't see it... they never will see it.

I do wonder how many of either group are dog or cat people, because the n00bs who just don't seem to get why arm-chopping in WMIBACIL is funny and appropriate in that setting and the arm-loss in AFTA is pretty dumb remind me a little of excited puppies. They don't care about the quality or nuance of the entertainment on offer. They're being entertained! That's all that matters to them!

On the other hand, some people seem to watch Futurama like cats. They'll enjoy it, but they'll also critique it mercilessly... because entertainment should be of the highest possible standard, as should their food, the service they receive from their human minions, and their eventual post-mortem deification (I'm certain that all cats expect this and would be surprised not to receive it).

It seems to me that there is a slight lack of care, attention to detail, and the sheer craftsmanship that went into making the original run in new Futurama. This has led to a corresponding drop in the overall level of humour, intelligence, heart, or thought (and other qualities) that are displayed in the finished product. The difference is small, but marked to those who know what they're looking for. The puppy-type fans don't see the difference and don't care enough that it'd bother them if they eventually "got" it. The cat-types... well, they feel that declining standards are inexcusable, and would prefer to have a smaller selection of higher-quality things to be entertained by than endless varieties of shit.

In all fairness though, it really is just a cartoon. There are more entertaining things in this world than television. Watching the mating rituals of rocks, for example, is more entertaining than most of what's on television today. Which I think is why Futurama's new paradigm has so many supporters... it's still better than the alternative. Which is why and how I've made peace with the decline in quality that has begun to be obvious now, and why and how I've decided that I'm not going to pick nits about it anymore. For me, the original run is largely superior. But I'm no longer going to try to change anybody else's opinion about that.

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