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Author Topic: Thoughts on 7ACV07 - The Six Million Dollar Mon - SPOILERS!  (Read 15374 times)
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PEE Poll: Rating
1/10 - Crap!   -4 (5.1%)
2/10   -1 (1.3%)
3/10   -1 (1.3%)
4/10   -2 (2.6%)
5/10 - Average   -1 (1.3%)
6/10   -6 (7.7%)
7/10   -11 (14.1%)
8/10   -21 (26.9%)
9/10   -18 (23.1%)
10/10 - Perfect!   -13 (16.7%)
Total Voters: 78

sparkybarky

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #120 on: 07-27-2012 15:24 »
« Last Edit on: 07-27-2012 20:25 »

Is Amy's complaint in the shower a Silence of the Lambs reference?

You mean the line, "It rubs the lotion on its skin or else it gets the hose again?" i really hope there are no allusions to that film, however much I really like it. Would be out of place, imho.
coffeeBot

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #121 on: 07-27-2012 16:12 »

I liked this one. It was fairly obvious how it was going to end, but there were a few moments that were absolutely hilarious. Certainly better than last week's episode. I'd watch this again. 8/10
totalnerd undercanada

DOOP Ubersecretary
**
« Reply #122 on: 07-27-2012 17:57 »

About tnuk's graph: The end of S6 is on par with the end of S3. Show's still good.

The lows are lower and the highs are... about the same. Slow decline. Whale biologist. Don't make me produce more graphs, or I'll print them out then come round and shove them up your behindus.
flesheatingbull

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #123 on: 07-27-2012 19:17 »


Fry lost his head and had it sown on to Amy's shoulder. That was just as ridiculous as dropping Hermes' brain back into his head and him springing back to life. Admittedly there have been a few occassions in recent episodes so they could do with cutting back on it, but it's certainly not a boundary the original run never crossed.

I beg to differ. Zoidberg kept Fry's head alive with quick surgery, and grafted it to Amy. This is not quite beyond the realms of possibility, even today. Even for something set 1,000 years in the future though, the idea of simply dropping a disconnected brain into a reconstituted cadaver (that had already been described as "beginning to rot" and had been used as a ventriloquist's dummy), then that corpse returning to life is pretty stupid.

The show's own internal logic never used to be that sloppy.
[/quote]

THIS!!!

I am far from trying to pick out gripes for the sake of it, but if you can't see the difference between the mutilations in 'put your head on my shoulders' and even 'bender's big score' to 'tip of the zoidberg' and this weeks atrocity, then i don't know what to tell you. Maybe you have lowered your standards and are just complacent with new futurama episodes, i don't know.

They are slowly but surly making this universe lamer and cheezier. Maybe ill just have to settle with new shows that have yet to break their universe's canon, such as Downton Abbey and Game of Thrones.

Spoiler








Robb is murdered at the Red Wedding.
SpaceGoldfish fromWazn

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #124 on: 07-27-2012 19:36 »
« Last Edit on: 07-27-2012 19:44 »

Agreed.  There are times when the episodes read like fanfiction.  Passable fanfiction, but not acceptable for the show itself.   I thought the twist at the end was rather clever, but was poorly executed.  They should have shown Zoidberg keeping the corpse in some sort of futuristic pickle jar, to keep it "non rotting and fresh" or something else thats Futurama-y.

The futuristic embalming fluid could have been what destroyed Roberto, since it wouldn't be beyond the realm of impossiblity for that fluid to be lethal to robots in some way.  Sure, that plotline would still be a bit fanfictiony, but it would go with the show's universe better then HURR DURR JAMAICAN PEOPLE LIEK SPICY FOOD HURR DURR.

And no, that line wasn't a nod to Silence of the Lambs.  It's just a joke that Fry was so caught up in something that he wasn't interested in what every heterosexual male in his position would be salivating at: either getting to rub lotion on their naked girlfriend's back in the shower, or getting to watch two girls lotioning eachother up in the shower/naked lesbian shower s and m.  And just like everything else, there's a trope for it: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/NotDistractedByTheSexy


sparkybarky

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #125 on: 07-27-2012 20:16 »

Oh...wait, now I think I understand what hobbitboy was getting at, with his comment about a reference to "Silence of the Lambs." The whole Roberto-wanting-LaBarbara's-skin thing, and him wanting to eat Hermes' skin like pencil shavings--a nod to Buffalo Bill's "skinning his humps." Is that what you mean, hobbitboy? Of course, that wasn't exactly it.

Starling: "He's making himself a woman suit!"

I need to say it, though it has no relevance to this discussion: "Put the f***ing lotion in the basket!"

There, that's better. Maybe the tie between this ep and that movie would be stronger if Roberto had kept LaBarbara in a pit, and Zoidberg kept Hermes' rotting corpse parts in a bathtub. But I would really like to keep that depressing, disturbing emotional atmosphere away from Futurama!
DotheBartman

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #126 on: 07-27-2012 20:37 »
« Last Edit on: 07-27-2012 20:39 »

They are slowly but surly making this universe lamer and cheezier. Maybe ill just have to settle with new shows that have yet to break their universe's canon, such as Downton Abbey and Game of Thrones.



You're missing an extremely important point here. Those shows have yet to "break" their canon because they're the type of shows in which 100% continuity actually matters in the first place. They aren't the type of shows that would break their continuity. They're not even comedies, which as a genre tends to be a lot looser with continuity than dramas or things like that.

The creators of the show have said multiple times that they don't stick to 100 percent continuity, that they in fact had to abandon that really early on far before the show got cancelled the first time, because it would just hinder them way too much. The commentaries are full of jokes about inconsistencies and logical problems. This isn't a new thing. It's just that people who take the show's world a little too seriously are finally catching on.
SpaceGoldfish fromWazn

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #127 on: 07-27-2012 21:12 »

I don't think it was a reference, because Roberto wanted to eat LaBarbara's skin, rather then make himself a little woman suit out of it.  He also asked her to hand it over, showing how absolutely crazy he is.  It's her skin, not a purse.  (He strikes me as more insane then sadistic, asking a woman to flay herself alive is a bit... you know.) 

Precious!  Are you there? 
totalnerd undercanada

DOOP Ubersecretary
**
« Reply #128 on: 07-27-2012 21:33 »

The creators of the show have said multiple times that they don't stick to 100 percent continuity, that they in fact had to abandon that really early on far before the show got cancelled the first time, because it would just hinder them way too much. The commentaries are full of jokes about inconsistencies and logical problems. This isn't a new thing.

They never really "abandoned" continuity - they would make throwaway jokes that conflicted with 100% accurate continuity now and again, but never threw it all down the toilet. Not until partway through Season 6, anyhow. In fact, from Season 1 to Season 4, we saw things expanded upon that had been established in earlier episodes. There was a very definite continuity in place for the original run that was never really meddled with. There was a timeline that the staff were working to. Secrets to reveal, relationships to establish. Important facts to carry over from one episode to the next. That's something that they never abandoned. I think what you're referring to is one of the commentaries from the original run in which DXC and the writer of the episode discuss the problems that it causes when they poke at continuity too much... and they basically just agree that it's okay when it's done for the sake of a really good joke. They then go on to say that they try to stick to established continuity, but if it's going to cause a problem to do so, they'll let the plot of the episode steamroller smoothly over it as though there were no issue there. Which is presumably because it's easier.

Quote
It's just that people who take the show's world a little too seriously are finally catching on.

I don't take Futurama or any other cartoon too seriously, personally. I would just prefer that it go back to being clever, rather than balls-out stupid. I mean, I like my entertainment to be something other than pants-shittingly-retarded once in a while (which is why I can't stand Family Guy or American Dad anymore. They're just too dumb).

But this show used to take itself just seriously enough that this was never really an issue. It just got looser and looser as time wore on, and now it's really stopped caring what they said two episodes ago. It's almost as though a lot of the current batch of episodes are set in a slightly different, much more cartoon-y Futuramaverse than previous ones, and I don't like this.

Logical problems such as the ones you've already mentioned used to exist for the sake of amusement. Now they're there for the sake of half-arsed jokes and for the sake of lazy, inconsistent writing.

To address some of your specific examples:

It's pointless to try to rationalize this show's world. At best it's selective memory. There isn't a scientific or even internal reason that the ship's internal clock (or whatever it was called) gets turned into a pinup calendar when they travel back in time. Even within this show, there's no way you can rationalize that as making any sense. And that's what makes it funny and a great gag.
The internal reason exists. It's 1947. Therefore the date readout has become something more period-appropriate. It makes no sense as to why it would even need to do that (especially as the rest of the ship doesn't need to), but it's done the same thing as the corn (which has become "less popped than ever", despite it being unlikely to have existed in that state in 1947). Sure, it makes little sense. But it does follow internal logic, and it's funny. Those are the two things that make it forgivable, and allow me to enjoy them.

Quote
It's just thinking too hard about it. I can think of a whole bunch of continuity errors in the original run, some of them things the writers probably noticed and just didn't care that much about. The fact that characters had previously mentioned Star Trek, that Bender's percentages added up to more than 100 percent, that French was a "dead language" except when it wasn't, that Zoidberg apparently had alive parents even though they should have died breeding...I mean I could go on. The writers ignored them because they weren't important to the overarching world of the show.
Bender's composition is a running joke. It's not something that breaks continuity, because it slots smoothly into it. He's pretty much 40% everything. Or at least 40% whatever they need him to be at the time. Which is funny, clever, able to serve the plot, and therefore forgivable. Even enjoyable. Stuff like that was actually written in on purpose to amuse the kind of audience they expected to attract, and it works.

Star Trek's been dealt with more than once on these forums. I'm simply going to roll my eyes at you for that one. French being a dead language is funny, and that's the end of it (apart from me mentioning that Latin is currently a dead language, but plenty of people are able to communicate in it today. It's just a little obscure, and even intelligent people have been frustrated by obscurity).

Zoidberg's parents are not alive. The one time he's been shown as a child with a family member, she made reference to the fact that his parents are dead. Go and actually watch the show. Maybe then you'll learn what you're talking about.

Quote
In the very first episode, Bender re-attaches his arms in a way that's literally impossible (and no one give me the line about how his arms can control themselves from afar; from the framing of the scene and Fry's reaction, it's pretty obvious that the writers themselves had not established that and that for the sake of the joke they were assuming otherwise), and an offhand line by Fry basically writes it off as intentionally absurd and doesn't even try to explain it. That's what made it funny. And it was a pretty clear tip off from the writers about the level of internal logic and consistency that the show would have. Which is to say, not a tremendous amount, and a really good joke will (generally) trump everything else.

That's the thing. The line you've told everybody not to give you is pretty much the explanation - it's something that comes up in later episodes, Bender having distance control of his appendages and parts. In fact, it comes up in one form as early as the very next episode, so cram it. Meatbag.

Oh, and before you cram it, remember this: a really good joke is not what most of the things that get pointed out as stupid or inconsistent are. If they were really good jokes, that wouldn't be happening. roll eyes
AdrenalinDragon

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #129 on: 07-27-2012 21:39 »

Still not sure what to rate this episode yet. I felt the jokes were better than most this season, but the continuity and logic errors like Roberto's robot speaking without the chip installed, Fry surviving outer space without wearing any clothes, and Hermes' skin melting robots really annoyed me. Also, the mutilations are becoming too frequent and this season really needs a standout episode for me to keep watching on a regular basis.
SpaceGoldfish fromWazn

Urban Legend
***
« Reply #130 on: 07-27-2012 21:56 »

Agreed.  
Still not sure what to rate this episode yet. I felt the jokes were better than most this season, but the continuity and logic errors like Roberto's robot speaking without the chip installed, Fry surviving outer space without wearing any clothes, and Hermes' skin melting robots really annoyed me. Also, the mutilations are becoming too frequent and this season really needs a standout episode for me to keep watching on a regular basis.

A f*cking greed.
DannyJC13

DOOP Secretary
*
« Reply #131 on: 07-27-2012 23:48 »

Explanation for Mecha-Roberto talking before his brain is actually in there:

Wi-fi. Makes sense. It's the year 3012.
flesheatingbull

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #132 on: 07-28-2012 00:04 »

Straws were grasped.
sparkybarky

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #133 on: 07-28-2012 00:06 »

Pretty trivial, but I noticed it anyway: in this ep, Scruffy pronounces "toilet" like toy-let. In 300BBs, he says it like ter-let ("Prison's not too bad. You can make sangria in the terlet.")This is yet another egregious continuity flaw.   cry
DannyJC13

DOOP Secretary
*
« Reply #134 on: 07-28-2012 00:07 »

Not really...
sparkybarky

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #135 on: 07-28-2012 00:09 »

Sarcasm in my previous post.
Crash_7

Professor
*
« Reply #136 on: 07-28-2012 00:49 »

It was heading for a high 6/low 7 rating, but Zoidberg's sendup of Monster Mash got it a solid 8 from me.
DotheBartman

Liquid Emperor
**
« Reply #137 on: 07-28-2012 03:37 »
« Last Edit on: 07-28-2012 03:40 »

Quote
They never really "abandoned" continuity - they would make throwaway jokes that conflicted with 100% accurate continuity now and again, but never threw it all down the toilet. Not until partway through Season 6, anyhow. In fact, from Season 1 to Season 4, we saw things expanded upon that had been established in earlier episodes.

I'm aware of that. But they stuck to continuity on meaningful, important things, like how Fry got to the future, Leela's parents, things like that. A lot of the stuff being nitpicked to death now is nowhere near that scale, and isn't something the writers would have cared that much about then, either.

Quote
There was a very definite continuity in place for the original run that was never really meddled with. There was a timeline that the staff were working to. Secrets to reveal, relationships to establish. Important facts to carry over from one episode to the next. That's something that they never abandoned.

I hate to insult the writers and don't really mean to, but in a sense you're giving them too much credit. There were a few major things worked into early shows that were paid off, but even with those the writers were still figuring out exactly what and when the payoffs would be. They knew Nibbler had something to do with Fry being in the future, but not the details. They laid them in there in part to give themselves future story opportunities, not because there was ever an end goal in mind for the whole series. The only really planned out relationships would probably be between Fry and Leela, and between Fry and Bender as well (before people freak out: I'm using "relationship" in a broader way and not just romantic ones). Even something like, for instance, Amy and Kif was just a happy accident. The writers liked the idea and decided to see if it would take them anywhere.

Quote
I think what you're referring to is one of the commentaries from the original run in which DXC and the writer of the episode discuss the problems that it causes when they poke at continuity too much... and they basically just agree that it's okay when it's done for the sake of a really good joke. They then go on to say that they try to stick to established continuity, but if it's going to cause a problem to do so, they'll let the plot of the episode steamroller smoothly over it as though there were no issue there. Which is presumably because it's easier.

There was an interview somewhere last year where David X. specifically used the word "abandon" and described that they had to give up on strict continuity after a while because it just wasn't feasible to maintain. This is especially true in a show like this; a drama is easy in part because there are usually fewer working parts basically, but a comedy has so many offhand jokes that it can become hindering if you stick to it strictly, if not impossible to maintain (and most comedies I watch have made at least minor continuity errors, if not lots of larger ones). If an offhand joke in season 3 makes a plotline in season 8 technically impossible, so be it.


Quote
I don't take Futurama or any other cartoon too seriously, personally. I would just prefer that it go back to being clever, rather than balls-out stupid. I mean, I like my entertainment to be something other than pants-shittingly-retarded once in a while (which is why I can't stand Family Guy or American Dad anymore. They're just too dumb).

Those were pretty dumb to begin with....

And Futurama is still an extremely clever show. I can think of very few that surpass it. And one of the few (The Daily Show, my favorite show) has been on since before Futurama even hit the airwaves. The competition here is pretty slim, even with there actually being lots of great shows on the air nowdays.

Quote
But this show used to take itself just seriously enough that this was never really an issue. It just got looser and looser as time wore on, and now it's really stopped caring what they said two episodes ago. It's almost as though a lot of the current batch of episodes are set in a slightly different, much more cartoon-y Futuramaverse than previous ones, and I don't like this.

I would call that a pretty accurate description if we were talking about episodes in season two. Like all TV shows, the show has evolved, by the second, third, fourth seasons, yeah, it was no longer where it was at when it started. It got "looser" if you will. At one point, it was supposed to be the case that time travel would be impossible in the show. But the show evolved from season one. Such is the world of TV.

Quote
Logical problems such as the ones you've already mentioned used to exist for the sake of amusement. Now they're there for the sake of half-arsed jokes and for the sake of lazy, inconsistent writing.

Whether you like them is a matter of individual taste. However, to say that they are still "for the sake of amusement" would simply be a factual statement even now. That's what the writers are doing, or trying to do. They're not intentionally making a show you don't like to piss you off, which is one of the more ridiculous assertions (not made by you specifically) that I've seen in this thread so far.


Quote
The internal reason exists. It's 1947. Therefore the date readout has become something more period-appropriate. It makes no sense as to why it would even need to do that (especially as the rest of the ship doesn't need to), but it's done the same thing as the corn (which has become "less popped than ever", despite it being unlikely to have existed in that state in 1947). Sure, it makes little sense. But it does follow internal logic, and it's funny. Those are the two things that make it forgivable, and allow me to enjoy them.

That's not an internal reason. It's just a joke. Same as every other continuity or logical "error" they've made that you've complained about. Again, whether you like it or find it funny is a matter of individual taste. But the fact remains that they are still jokes, and in still in the spirit of something like that. There isn't a feasible explanation for the calendar changing that way just because they travel in time. And that is precisely the reason that it's funny.

Quote
Bender's composition is a running joke. It's not something that breaks continuity, because it slots smoothly into it. He's pretty much 40% everything. Or at least 40% whatever they need him to be at the time. Which is funny, clever, able to serve the plot, and therefore forgivable. Even enjoyable. Stuff like that was actually written in on purpose to amuse the kind of audience they expected to attract, and it works.

But that's exactly what I'm describing in the first place! Simply saying "oh, that was a joke" is not an explanation for the logic behind it. It is still technically an "error" regardless of whether it's a purposeful one (if I remember correctly, they originally made an honest-to-god mistake, but decided to roll with it in later episodes because it was funny). The same is true of many of the things people are complaining about now. They are illogical on purpose. That's the joke behind them. Every Futurama episode has jokes that are illogical on purpose, going back to the very beginning of the show. And sometimes a minor joke from a previous episode isn't worth sticking to if another minor joke is just as funny, such as with the French thing (again, with the way it was specifically referenced, it was pretty clear the language was literally lost; they went back on that later because the jokes using French in season 4 were too good to stick to. And I remember tons of whining about it back then, too.)

Quote
Zoidberg's parents are not alive. The one time he's been shown as a child with a family member, she made reference to the fact that his parents are dead.

As I recall (and I've seen that episode many times), they don't reference that. It is implied that it's his mother who doesn't want him to be a doctor, comedian, etc. Of course you could come up with some feasible explanation about it being his aunt, etc, but the simple fact is that they never say that or explain it that way.


Quote
That's the thing. The line you've told everybody not to give you is pretty much the explanation - it's something that comes up in later episodes, Bender having distance control of his appendages and parts.

Right, but did anyone know that back in 1999 when the pilot premiered? No. I would bet dollars to donuts too that the writers didn't know that when they first wrote that joke, either. It came up in subsequent episodes because the idea of his arm stealing things form people was funny, not because they needed to explain a joke from the pilot that was equally and purposefully absurd.

Watch the way it's framed and animated even. The joke is clearly "he had no way of doing this." It plays differently now, but that's what it was when it was written.
flesheatingbull

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #138 on: 07-28-2012 04:44 »

Quote
They never really "abandoned" continuity - they would make throwaway jokes that conflicted with 100% accurate continuity now and again, but never threw it all down the toilet. Not until partway through Season 6, anyhow. In fact, from Season 1 to Season 4, we saw things expanded upon that had been established in earlier episodes.

I'm aware of that. But they stuck to continuity on meaningful, important things, like how Fry got to the future, Leela's parents, things like that. A lot of the stuff being nitpicked to death now is nowhere near that scale, and isn't something the writers would have cared that much about then, either.

Quote
There was a very definite continuity in place for the original run that was never really meddled with. There was a timeline that the staff were working to. Secrets to reveal, relationships to establish. Important facts to carry over from one episode to the next. That's something that they never abandoned.

I hate to insult the writers and don't really mean to, but in a sense you're giving them too much credit. There were a few major things worked into early shows that were paid off, but even with those the writers were still figuring out exactly what and when the payoffs would be. They knew Nibbler had something to do with Fry being in the future, but not the details. They laid them in there in part to give themselves future story opportunities, not because there was ever an end goal in mind for the whole series. The only really planned out relationships would probably be between Fry and Leela, and between Fry and Bender as well (before people freak out: I'm using "relationship" in a broader way and not just romantic ones). Even something like, for instance, Amy and Kif was just a happy accident. The writers liked the idea and decided to see if it would take them anywhere.

Quote
I think what you're referring to is one of the commentaries from the original run in which DXC and the writer of the episode discuss the problems that it causes when they poke at continuity too much... and they basically just agree that it's okay when it's done for the sake of a really good joke. They then go on to say that they try to stick to established continuity, but if it's going to cause a problem to do so, they'll let the plot of the episode steamroller smoothly over it as though there were no issue there. Which is presumably because it's easier.

There was an interview somewhere last year where David X. specifically used the word "abandon" and described that they had to give up on strict continuity after a while because it just wasn't feasible to maintain. This is especially true in a show like this; a drama is easy in part because there are usually fewer working parts basically, but a comedy has so many offhand jokes that it can become hindering if you stick to it strictly, if not impossible to maintain (and most comedies I watch have made at least minor continuity errors, if not lots of larger ones). If an offhand joke in season 3 makes a plotline in season 8 technically impossible, so be it.


Quote
I don't take Futurama or any other cartoon too seriously, personally. I would just prefer that it go back to being clever, rather than balls-out stupid. I mean, I like my entertainment to be something other than pants-shittingly-retarded once in a while (which is why I can't stand Family Guy or American Dad anymore. They're just too dumb).

Those were pretty dumb to begin with....

And Futurama is still an extremely clever show. I can think of very few that surpass it. And one of the few (The Daily Show, my favorite show) has been on since before Futurama even hit the airwaves. The competition here is pretty slim, even with there actually being lots of great shows on the air nowdays.

Quote
But this show used to take itself just seriously enough that this was never really an issue. It just got looser and looser as time wore on, and now it's really stopped caring what they said two episodes ago. It's almost as though a lot of the current batch of episodes are set in a slightly different, much more cartoon-y Futuramaverse than previous ones, and I don't like this.

I would call that a pretty accurate description if we were talking about episodes in season two. Like all TV shows, the show has evolved, by the second, third, fourth seasons, yeah, it was no longer where it was at when it started. It got "looser" if you will. At one point, it was supposed to be the case that time travel would be impossible in the show. But the show evolved from season one. Such is the world of TV.

Quote
Logical problems such as the ones you've already mentioned used to exist for the sake of amusement. Now they're there for the sake of half-arsed jokes and for the sake of lazy, inconsistent writing.

Whether you like them is a matter of individual taste. However, to say that they are still "for the sake of amusement" would simply be a factual statement even now. That's what the writers are doing, or trying to do. They're not intentionally making a show you don't like to piss you off, which is one of the more ridiculous assertions (not made by you specifically) that I've seen in this thread so far.


Quote
The internal reason exists. It's 1947. Therefore the date readout has become something more period-appropriate. It makes no sense as to why it would even need to do that (especially as the rest of the ship doesn't need to), but it's done the same thing as the corn (which has become "less popped than ever", despite it being unlikely to have existed in that state in 1947). Sure, it makes little sense. But it does follow internal logic, and it's funny. Those are the two things that make it forgivable, and allow me to enjoy them.

That's not an internal reason. It's just a joke. Same as every other continuity or logical "error" they've made that you've complained about. Again, whether you like it or find it funny is a matter of individual taste. But the fact remains that they are still jokes, and in still in the spirit of something like that. There isn't a feasible explanation for the calendar changing that way just because they travel in time. And that is precisely the reason that it's funny.

Quote
Bender's composition is a running joke. It's not something that breaks continuity, because it slots smoothly into it. He's pretty much 40% everything. Or at least 40% whatever they need him to be at the time. Which is funny, clever, able to serve the plot, and therefore forgivable. Even enjoyable. Stuff like that was actually written in on purpose to amuse the kind of audience they expected to attract, and it works.

But that's exactly what I'm describing in the first place! Simply saying "oh, that was a joke" is not an explanation for the logic behind it. It is still technically an "error" regardless of whether it's a purposeful one (if I remember correctly, they originally made an honest-to-god mistake, but decided to roll with it in later episodes because it was funny). The same is true of many of the things people are complaining about now. They are illogical on purpose. That's the joke behind them. Every Futurama episode has jokes that are illogical on purpose, going back to the very beginning of the show. And sometimes a minor joke from a previous episode isn't worth sticking to if another minor joke is just as funny, such as with the French thing (again, with the way it was specifically referenced, it was pretty clear the language was literally lost; they went back on that later because the jokes using French in season 4 were too good to stick to. And I remember tons of whining about it back then, too.)

Quote
Zoidberg's parents are not alive. The one time he's been shown as a child with a family member, she made reference to the fact that his parents are dead.

As I recall (and I've seen that episode many times), they don't reference that. It is implied that it's his mother who doesn't want him to be a doctor, comedian, etc. Of course you could come up with some feasible explanation about it being his aunt, etc, but the simple fact is that they never say that or explain it that way.


Quote
That's the thing. The line you've told everybody not to give you is pretty much the explanation - it's something that comes up in later episodes, Bender having distance control of his appendages and parts.

Right, but did anyone know that back in 1999 when the pilot premiered? No. I would bet dollars to donuts too that the writers didn't know that when they first wrote that joke, either. It came up in subsequent episodes because the idea of his arm stealing things form people was funny, not because they needed to explain a joke from the pilot that was equally and purposefully absurd.

Watch the way it's framed and animated even. The joke is clearly "he had no way of doing this." It plays differently now, but that's what it was when it was written.

I stopped reading when you mentioned that your favorite show is the Liberal Propaganda of The Daily Show.
SolidSnake

Professor
*
« Reply #139 on: 07-28-2012 05:12 »
« Last Edit on: 07-28-2012 05:21 »

Explanation for Mecha-Roberto talking before his brain is actually in there:

Wi-fi. Makes sense. It's the year 3012.
Exactly what I was thinking! Maybe after the brain was taken out, the robot body enabled a wi-fi part that would enable nearby devices, and even circuit boards.
It was heading for a high 6/low 7 rating, but Zoidberg's sendup of Monster Mash got it a solid 8 from me.
I loved that scene!  big grin but I just had to give this episode a 10/10. I loved almost everything about it. Maybe I would change it to a 9/10 , but whatever.
Louiswuenator

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« Reply #140 on: 07-28-2012 07:12 »

Ugh.  Please people, if this is going to descend into another 'old Futurama is better than new Futurama' debate, can we please leave it to the general discussion thread?  I find the redundancy irritating in this case.
winna

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« Reply #141 on: 07-28-2012 07:57 »

Right, but did anyone know that back in 1999 when the pilot premiered? No. I would bet dollars to donuts too that the writers didn't know that when they first wrote that joke, either. It came up in subsequent episodes because the idea of his arm stealing things form people was funny, not because they needed to explain a joke from the pilot that was equally and purposefully absurd.

Watch the way it's framed and animated even. The joke is clearly "he had no way of doing this." It plays differently now, but that's what it was when it was written.

Actually that joke was even better when it first aired.  The show cut to commercial right after Bender's arms fell off, then after the commercial, you can see him using one arm already attached to put the other arm back on.  It was brilliant and subtle and fantastic.
DotheBartman

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« Reply #142 on: 07-28-2012 08:21 »

Yeah I've noticed that from the break on the DVD (Adult Swim used to mess that up, which pissed me off). Such a great joke.

And sorry Flesheatingbull, but the creators and writers on Futurama are also quite well known for their "liberal propaganda" (if comedy shows not actually intended to sway minds can be considered propaganda these days).
winna

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« Reply #143 on: 07-28-2012 08:35 »

When are we going to get the Indiana Jones remakes?
SolidSnake

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« Reply #144 on: 07-28-2012 08:58 »

Gosh, this whole conversation thing between DotheBartman and flesheatingbull is getting so off-topic!  roll eyes.
futurefreak

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« Reply #145 on: 07-28-2012 09:02 »

* futurefreak 's head hurts

The killing of Roberto has definitely turned me toward the uber-negative for the rest of the series. I have sadly grown accustomed to the lackluster plots, but really? Gonna kill off recurring background characters now? Why don't we bring Morgan Proctor back and kill her off too? roll eyes
flesheatingbull

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« Reply #146 on: 07-28-2012 09:04 »

Yeah I've noticed that from the break on the DVD (Adult Swim used to mess that up, which pissed me off). Such a great joke.

And sorry Flesheatingbull, but the creators and writers on Futurama are also quite well known for their "liberal propaganda" (if comedy shows not actually intended to sway minds can be considered propaganda these days).

When you have an extremely strong opinion and you push it's agenda, what do you think people are going to get out of it?

END THE FED!

Also, as i've already stated, this episode was terrible and i feel terrible because of it.

More Mobius Dick and A Clockwork Origin less of this crappola. And for the record, this and tip of aoidberg are the only two that stick out in season 7 as being completely lousy.
winna

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« Reply #147 on: 07-28-2012 09:09 »

* futurefreak 's head hurts

The killing of Roberto has definitely turned me toward the uber-negative for the rest of the series. I have sadly grown accustomed to the lackluster plots, but really? Gonna kill off recurring background characters now? Why don't we bring Morgan Proctor back and kill her off too? roll eyes

Sounds like somebody needs to go back and watch When Aliens Attack again. tongue
SolidSnake

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« Reply #148 on: 07-28-2012 09:16 »
« Last Edit on: 07-28-2012 09:17 »

I feel that this beginning season should have been known to be a stinker to longtime loyal fans, since they WERE written before Season 6B aired, and the crew thought everybody liked 6A. Oh well, maybe next year will be better to you guys. I did like some eps of this season so far though.

@futurefreak I do agree with you on that. I mean, kill off Calculon and Roberto?? Who's next? Scruffy?? frown
Imy

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« Reply #149 on: 07-28-2012 09:19 »

Am I the only one who didn't like the monster mash parody? frown
winna

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« Reply #150 on: 07-28-2012 09:35 »

I thought it was okay.  I liked the creepy atmosphere before the professor opened up the planet express more though.
MuchAdo

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« Reply #151 on: 07-28-2012 10:26 »


Explanation for Mecha-Roberto talking before his brain is actually in there:

Ken Keeler's sense of humor.
totalnerd undercanada

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« Reply #152 on: 07-28-2012 10:59 »

Quote
Zoidberg's parents are not alive. The one time he's been shown as a child with a family member, she made reference to the fact that his parents are dead.

As I recall (and I've seen that episode many times), they don't reference that. It is implied that it's his mother who doesn't want him to be a doctor, comedian, etc. Of course you could come up with some feasible explanation about it being his aunt, etc, but the simple fact is that they never say that or explain it that way.
So that line about his parents rolling over in their graves was cut from your DVD?
winna

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« Reply #153 on: 07-28-2012 11:02 »
« Last Edit on: 07-28-2012 11:05 »


Explanation for Mecha-Roberto talking before his brain is actually in there:

Ken Keeler's sense of humor.

That was really the only ridiculous bit that stuck out to me, but now that you mention it, I can understand why it was funny.  If I rewatch it, I'll probably enjoy it even more.

Quote
Zoidberg's parents are not alive. The one time he's been shown as a child with a family member, she made reference to the fact that his parents are dead.

As I recall (and I've seen that episode many times), they don't reference that. It is implied that it's his mother who doesn't want him to be a doctor, comedian, etc. Of course you could come up with some feasible explanation about it being his aunt, etc, but the simple fact is that they never say that or explain it that way.
So that line about his parents rolling over in their graves was cut from your DVD?

DotheBartman saw the episode on network television on February 25th, 2001.  It's a bit far fetched to expect someone to remember a single line from a television show's original air date 11 years ago.

Also, dialogue has been known to have been edited in Futurama, up to and including the removal of Sweet Zombie Jesus when aired on Adult Swim.  I'm absolutely certain there were other examples, but I can't remember them specifically.
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« Reply #154 on: 07-28-2012 14:22 »

And for the record, this and tip of aoidberg are the only two that stick out in season 7 as being completely lousy.

First of all, it's 'The Tip of the Zoidberg', not 'tip of aoidberg', and second, TTOTZ is from 6B, not 7A.
FishyJoe

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« Reply #155 on: 07-28-2012 14:29 »
« Last Edit on: 07-28-2012 20:58 »

 roll eyes There sure are a lot of nitpicking little brats on PEEL nowadays.

Quote from: tnuk
Zoidberg kept Fry's head alive with quick surgery, and grafted it to Amy. This is not quite beyond the realms of possibility, even today.

...now I've read everything!
DannyJC13

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« Reply #156 on: 07-28-2012 14:39 »

roll eyes There sure are a lot of nitpicking little brats on PEEL nowadays.

It's called being a nerd. And if you want nitpicking, go to tnuk.
UnrealLegend

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« Reply #157 on: 07-28-2012 15:52 »

In spite of all the mixed opinions, I firmly believe that this episode will be in my top 10 at least.

Hermes' body coming back to life didn't bother me, because I assumed that Zoidberg had prepared it for reactivation (think how quickly it came into effect during BBS). It's not uncommon for him to be a competent doctor when the plot calls for it.

As for Roberto dying, I don't care even though he's one of my favourite characters. If the writers want to kill off a character then that's fine. It's their show, not ours. Besides, they could always bring him back Agnew style.
DannyJC13

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« Reply #158 on: 07-28-2012 16:07 »

It's their show, not ours.

Strongly agree.
sparkybarky

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« Reply #159 on: 07-28-2012 16:32 »

roll eyes There sure are a lot of nitpicking little brats on PEEL nowadays.

I prefer the politically correct term "Melllvars."

I agree with you, though.
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