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PEEL - The Futurama Message Board    General Disscussion    A question for all Futurama viewers OUTSIDE of North America. « previous next »
Author Topic: A question for all Futurama viewers OUTSIDE of North America.  (Read 2935 times)
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Cube1701
Crustacean
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« Reply #40 on: 08-03-2010 13:35 »

I seem to recall the commentary in Into the Wild Green Yonder mentioning that some parts were unintentionally funny to people here in the UK due to their choice of words. So it works both ways.
cyber_turnip

Urban Legend
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« Reply #41 on: 08-03-2010 14:51 »

I don't remember that, but it's sort of true. The 'Bend Gay' joke from 'Bendless Love' has an extra layer of humour to us Brits.
Aki

Professor
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« Reply #42 on: 08-05-2010 00:26 »

I don't think 'bittersweet' means what you think it means.
I don't think Svip knows what 'bittersweet' means.
Svip

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #43 on: 08-05-2010 18:02 »

I don't think 'bittersweet' means what you think it means.
I don't think Svip knows what 'bittersweet' means.

I know what it means, I just wouldn't use it that context.  It seems... wrong.  Bittersweet is not 'nice and horrid', but 'emotional and painful'.  Vastly different choices of words.
Cube1701
Crustacean
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« Reply #44 on: 08-06-2010 14:43 »

I don't remember that, but it's sort of true. The 'Bend Gay' joke from 'Bendless Love' has an extra layer of humour to us Brits.

They were probably talking about the word "bend". Some of the other scenes in Bendless Love, such as where they talk about the Professor being bent, has a totally different meaning to us.
Aki

Professor
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« Reply #45 on: 08-06-2010 14:46 »

That's exactly what cyber turnip just said, my dear poppler.
Freako

Urban Legend
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« Reply #46 on: 08-06-2010 16:27 »

He's a menace to every straight person in the company!
Jarvio

Bending Unit
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« Reply #47 on: 08-06-2010 17:57 »
« Last Edit on: 08-06-2010 18:05 »

Has there been any word yet as to when the new series of Futurama will air in the UK? I've been watching the new series online via streaming, but I'm just curious as to when it will officially air in the UK. I know that England get new episodes of South Park about 2 days after America do. Why can't old Futurama be the same?
FemJesse

Liquid Emperor
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« Reply #48 on: 08-06-2010 18:03 »

We don't use that kind of language here. Thar be ladies.
cyber_turnip

Urban Legend
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« Reply #49 on: 08-06-2010 20:38 »

Has there been any word yet as to when the new series of Futurama will air in the UK? I've been watching the new series online via streaming, but I'm just curious as to when it will officially air in the UK. I know that England get new episodes of South Park about 2 days after America do. Why can't old Futurama be the same?
Because Comedy Central owns all of the rights to South Park whereas it only owns the rights to air Futurama in America.

And no. To the best of my knowledge there hasn't been any official word on it yet. My guess is that Sky One will eventually pull their finger out and air them but we'll probably get a DVD release before then and I don't have Sky One anyway so I couldn't care less.
willsterdude3000

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #50 on: 08-10-2010 23:40 »

I find myself laughing at references even if don't understand them.
SweetZombieJesus

Bending Unit
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« Reply #51 on: 08-11-2010 14:18 »

I agree that a lot of the content makes fun of North America. Of course there are always the stereotypical jokes about other nationalities which I love, but for the most part North America pop culture takes the brunt of the blows. Good to know all you other PEEL'ers out there love it even if sometimes you may not understand it.

I just talked to my Canadian friends the other day who had no idea who Susan Boyle was so chalk one up for the Brit's!
willsterdude3000

Starship Captain
****
« Reply #52 on: 08-11-2010 22:10 »

That's weird, considering the fact that it was a viral video a year ago. Maybe they don't use YouTube.
gypsyblue

Crustacean
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« Reply #53 on: 08-13-2010 09:21 »
« Last Edit on: 08-13-2010 09:30 »

No, peanut butter is fine. But in Australia jelly refers to what Americans call jello, what they call jelly we call jam. So, when I hear jelly sandwich (usually peanut butter and jelly) I picture jello on the sandwich.

Granted they do eat weird things over there now. (marshmallow sandwich spread, anyone?)

We do that too here in Canada! smile I always kind of knew what "jelly" was because of the expression "peanut butter and jelly" (definitely an Americanism) but we call it jam here. Although I use the expression "peanut butter and jelly," I couldn't imagine calling it "jelly" outside that context. "I'm having a piece of toast with jelly" just doesn't sound right to my Canadian ear.

Quote
That's weird, considering the fact that it was a viral video a year ago. Maybe they don't use YouTube.

I bet you can find lots of Americans that don't know who Susan Boyle is, it just depends. I'm Canadian and I think all my friends here know of Susan Boyle... also Youtube. Canadians are crazy about youtube.
SweetZombieJesus

Bending Unit
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« Reply #54 on: 08-13-2010 14:35 »

I am Canadian but was traveling through Scotland during the time of Susan so I knew who she was. For the record, I had no idea idea what "going viral" meant until I read this post and looked it up. I NEVER use youtube and rarely use the computer for anything outside of my emails and PEEL of course.
pluche93

Bending Unit
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« Reply #55 on: 09-07-2010 18:40 »
« Last Edit on: 09-07-2010 18:42 »

SweetZombieJesus: your friend is dumb not all canadian, I and everyone I know, Know about Susan Boyle so just beat your friend for me. All glory to Canada!! XD

edit: Yeah I forgot, Us in quebec are less dumb than the rest of the canada... no offense fellows  laff

We all love Leela... especially me :P
my BOX-ART of season 6 DVD http://www.peelified.com/Futurama-Forum-6/Topic-19307-0-disc_of_the_season_DVD.html
coldangel

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #56 on: 09-08-2010 07:50 »

The one problem I run into when doing this is that I feel Futurama is very much a North American show.

To the extent that it was conceived, created, and written in North America by North Americans (and animated in Korea). So yeah, it references primarily North American culture, as a Japanese show would reference Japanese culture, an Australian show would reference Australian culture, etc...
Aki

Professor
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« Reply #57 on: 09-08-2010 09:14 »

The one problem I run into when doing this is that I feel Futurama is very much a North American show.

To the extent that it was conceived, created, and written in North America by North Americans (and animated in Korea). So yeah, it references primarily North American culture, as a Japanese show would reference Japanese culture, an Australian show would reference Australian culture, etc...

There are many that choose a more general audience, though. A program created in a certain country doesn't have to choose that as their audience. And for that matter, Futurama is much more America than for example The Simpsons. But that's not necessarily a bad thing.
Svip

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #58 on: 09-08-2010 09:29 »

Huh?  I always considered The Simpsons to be more American than Futurama.
coldangel

DOOP Secretary
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« Reply #59 on: 09-08-2010 13:00 »

...Yeah, far more American.

And why would an American animation "choose" (to the extent that it is possible for writers who are Americans and think like Americans) to appeal to another audience when the American audience is their biggest one?
Aki

Professor
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« Reply #60 on: 09-08-2010 15:07 »

Huh?  I always considered The Simpsons to be more American than Futurama.

Gosh, that was meant to be the other way around. Futurama is far less American than for example The Simpsons.

And why would an American animation "choose" (to the extent that it is possible for writers who are Americans and think like Americans) to appeal to another audience when the American audience is their biggest one?

An appeal to a more general audience makes for a bigger audience than appealing to only Americans. There are shows that consciously doesn't include references that large parts of their audience wouldn't understand.
any1else

Space Pope
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« Reply #61 on: 09-08-2010 15:23 »

I can enjoy British and American shows quite easily because of the cultural similarities. It's the same as being able to enjoy something when you are a kid, then watch it 10 years later, still enjoy it, but realise there were so many adult jokes in there you didn't even notice because you didn't understand. So if I went to live in the U.K or America for 10 years (or any other country) I'd begin to notice and appreciate even more of the jokes in a show made by people in that country/culture. But you can enjoy something without knowing everything. In fact it's good if you enjoy it, because if you do notice something you don't understand, you can look it up and educate yourself about it. If you're not lazy.
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